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Annual 




Direct from the Growcr ; 

JOSEPH HAPBIS CO. 

MOCCTOM fABU - JIOMCOE (o. N Y' 











































































smmmmmtammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmB 

E Special Attention & S> S S’ & 3 

is called to the following articles, of which we make SPECIALTIES, —3 

and are able to offer at MOST FAVORABLE TERMS: 


SEED POTATOES. 

New Early and Late varieties that yield 300 bushel* and more 
per acre. 

Prices low. See page* 21-22. 

IMPROVED FARM SEEDS. 

Mammoth Yellow Flint Corn f the Most Prolific, Earliest 
and Best corn for the north. See page 23. 

Baxter's New Prolific Barley. An Improved 6-rowed bar¬ 
ley. See page 23. 

CABBAGE SEED. 

Of our own growing from carefully selected heads. See 
pages 7-8. 


ONION SEED. 

Our Yellow Globe Danvers Is Perfection. See page 13. 

ONION SETS. 

We grow large quantities and can furnish very fine sets at 
Lowest prices. See page 13. 

FERTILIZING MATERIALS. 

Nitrate of Soda, Superphosphate, Muriate of Potash, at 
Lowest Prices. 

$10 per ton saved by mixing fertilizers at home. See page 40. 

TURKEYS. 

Wild Turkeys crossed with Bronze. Very Hardy and Vigor¬ 
ous. See third page of cover. 


CONTENTS OF THIS CATALOGUE. 


Page. 

Books. 2 

Vegetable Seeds. Complete list arranged In alphabetical 

order.....„..... 3-19 

Price List of Seed* In bulk. 20 

Seed Potatoes.......... 21-22 

Farm Heeds... 23 

Grass Heeds. 24 


Page. 

Flower Seeds. Complete list arranged in alphabetical 

order.25-34 

Flowering Bulbs and Plants. 35 

Roses. 36 

8mall Fruit Plants.37-39 

Fertilizers. 40 

Turkeys and Ducks. 41 


§E NEW “PLANET JR.” Hill Dropping Garden Seed Drill. 3 


Will Drop Seeds 
in Hills or Continuous 
Rows. & & 


*T*HIB is tho best and most complete 
A Drill we havo ever used. It not only 
drops seed In hill* at any desired dis¬ 
tance apart, but it sows all kinds of seeds 
In row* with remarkable evenness, hav¬ 
ing a force feed that sows tho lost few soods 
as evenly as when tho hopper is full. .Another 
great Improvement Is a rod attached to tho handlo, 
which, when pulled up, shuts off tho flow of seed, which 
can be started again Instantly by pressing down the rod. This 
Drill ha* many othor Improvement* which wo havo not space to 
describe. Manufacturer's prloo, $12.00; our price, with all improvo- 
mont*, *0.00. This Drill with fertilizer attachment! SI 3 .B 0 . 

COMBINED DRILL, WHEEL HOE, CULTIVATOR, 

AND PLOW. 

An oxoellont Drill, and after you havo finished sowing, tho machine is 
easily converted Into a hand cultivator. It Is supplied with a pair of rakes, a 
pair of long boos, three reversible cultivator teeth, and a garden plow. As a 

rake It Is invalunblo in preparing 
the garden for planting and also 

for dollcate after-cultivation of tho crop, and for covering tho seeds, etc. As a hoe it works 
safely and closely both sidos of the row at once when plants are small; between rows when 
plants aro largo, working all rows up to 16 inches wide at one passage. As a plow it opens 
furrows, covors thorn, hills, plows to and from, etc. As a cultivator It is admirably adapted 
to deep mellowing of the soil. All the blades are tempered and polished steel. Retail price, 
112.00. Our price, boxed, Including all attachments, $9.06. 




SINGLE WHEEL HOE. 


SINGLE WHEEL HOE. 

This Is an excellent tool for weeding onions, carrots and all crops of this kind, 
cheap that no one can afford to bo without It. Price, $3.0D. 


It is so 


SULPHO-TOBACCO SOAP—Kills Insects on Plants. —2 

For killing Aphides or llooon Roses and other plant* wo have found nothing so effective and convenient as Sulpho-Tobacco Soap. 

The Bulphur also prevent* mildew and keops the plants healthy. It 1* very easily applied by dissolving in water and sprinkling on the m 
plants. It 1* sure death to insect* of all kind* and novor injures the plants. The Soap comes In cakes which, when dissolved, make ^ 
three gallon* of wa*h each. This soap 1* also very effective for killing flea* on dogs. The animal should be washed, using this soap m 
Instead of ordinary soap. Full directions for use are printed on the cover of eaoh cake. Price, postpaid, 25c. per cake, 3 cakes 00c. m 

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Union nml Adv«rtU*r Pr*M, RoehetUr, X. T. 






















HARRIS' RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897 

AND CATALOGUE OF 


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MORETON FARM SEEDS and PLANTS 

I 

I 

l 

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JOSEPH HHRRIS CO. 

Postoffice Address, MORETON FARM, MONROE CO., N. Y. 
Telegrams Should be Sent to COLD WATER, N. Y. 



J 
: 

i 

j ABOUT OUR BUSINESS. 

j This is the 18th edition of our Rural Annual and Catalogue of Moreton 
jrm Seeds. 

\ Before we issued our first catalogue in 1879 wo had been raising such 
»ds as Cabbage, Mangels, Carrots, Potatoes and other field seeds for some 
Sirs, and had established some fine strains and new varieties of these 
[ds. We have ever since continued to raise seeds on a larger scale, 
i We have, as far as we know, the largest Seed Farm owned by any seeds- 
[n in this country doing a retail business. 

J Our farm embraces 250 acres of choice land near Rochester, N. Y. In 
0 we built a seed house on the farm and have since then conducted our 
Illness there. Our business increased so much that In 1889 a Postofllco 
established on the farm under the name of 11 Moreton Farm.” 

» We are on the main line of the New York Central Railroad, and letters 
ilresscd to “ Moreton Farm ” reach us two or three hours sooner than they 
juld if we were In a city where the mall would have to be sorted and 
Ivered. A letter mailed In New York City at 8 p. m. reaches us at 8.30 
1 next morning, and a letter mailed at Chicago beforo midnight, reaches 
|it5.45p. m. the next day. 

j ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED. 

r All orders, as far as possible, are filled and despatched on the day they 
! received. It sometimes happens that orders to bo shipped by freight or 
Jress are delayed a day or two, but are always gotten off promptly when 
*ither permits. 

; SHIPPING FACILITIES. 

i 

•All freight shipments are made from Rochester, whore wo have the 
lowing railroads: 

! New York Central, Rome, Watertown & Ogdonsburg, 

[ Erie, Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg, 

| Lehigh Valley Western New York «fc Penna., 

» West Shore. 

,d the following express companies : 

! American, National, United States, Wells, Fargo <fc Co. 
is gives us the best possible shipping facilities and lowest rates to all 
Ints. 

! OUR SPECIALTIES. 

i 

* We make a special point of raising Seed Potatoes of the newest and best 
rietles; Cabbage, of which we select the finest heads from which to raise 
Jl; Celery, Tomatoes and other vegetables of which we have produced 
he very fine strains. We also raise Pure Bred Pekin Ducks and Bronze 
rkeys. 

: BUY DIRECT FROM THE GROWER. 

i 

jThe advantages to be obtained from buying seeds, plants, potatoes, etc., 
£ct from the grower, instead of from city seedsmen, are many and 
'loos. Take potatoes, for instance ; most seedsmen have their stock of 
il potatoes delivered to them in the fall, and store them in warehouses 
jere they are exposed to considerable light and air and, consequently, 
fink and sprout long before they can be shipped to the purchaser and 
Inted. This shrinking and sprouting is, as we all know, very injurious 
}he seed. 

' On the other hand, where potatoes are kept on the farm and stored in 
»t cellars and pits, they remain in ported condition until time to plant in 
t spring. 


PRICES. 

Another advantage in buying direct from the grower is that you obtain 
lower prices. While wo always mako our prices ns low as possible, we 
cannot and will not attempt to compote with a class of dealers who sell old, 
mixed, and carelessly-grown scedsat low prices. If wo wished to deal in such 
stock wo could compete in prices ; but wo do not. It actually costs us two 
or threo times as much to raiso somo of our solootcd strains of cabbage, 
tomatoes, etc., as it would to buy ordinary seed; but our seed is worth ton 
times as much to any grower. Take onion seed, for instance. It is obvious 
that we cannot sell seed raised from selected bulbs, throwing out all that 
arc not of perfect sliapo or color, at as low a prlco as soed raised from any 
onion that will throw up a sood-stalk, regard loss of its quality. All seed 
that will grow is not good, by any moans; but, of course, tho seod must 
grow to be any good. 

THE POTATO CROP OF 1896. 

Although tho acreage planted to potatoes was ncaily as largo as in 1895 
tho yield was much bolow tho phonomonal production of that year. Tho 
season was in most sections apparently vory favorablo to tho crop, but 
owing to blight, which was vory prevalent, tho ylold was greatly reduced. 

The Importance of selecting varieties that resist the blight, and also of 
using seed from unaffected vines, could plainly bo seen in our trial Hold. 
Somo of tho older varieties, such as White Star, Hebron, Burbank, etc., 
wore badly affected, while such new varieties as Carman No. 1 and No. 3, 
Money Maker, Dutton’s Seedling, Early Harvest, eto., were practically freo 
from both blight and scab. We think there is a oloso connection between 
these two diseases. Wo noticed that where thcro was tho most blight thoro 
was tho most scab also. 

While tho yield in this county was not much ovor half that of last year, 
our crops of tho newer vurlotlcs turned out fully as largo and in somo 
cases larger crops than in 1895. 

We give below some of tho yields under ordinary field culture on our 
farm the past season : 

Eaki.y Vahietiks—E arly Harvest (white). 230 bu. per acre / 

Early May (pink). 265 bu. per acre 

Hebron (blighted)...,,. 115 bu. per acre 

Late V a hi eties—D utton’s Seedling (average). 305 bu. per acre 

Washington (new). 325 bu, per acre 

Carman No. 1. 290 bu. per acre 

Great Divide. 285 bu. per acre 

Common Varieties. 125 to 160 bu. per acre 

It must be remembered that these yields were on a large acreage and 
noton small plats, where most of tho largo yields wo seo reported in tho 
papers and catalogues are made. 

in mn west. 

Mr. Henry Field, of Page County, Iowa, reports the following yields: 


Carman No. 3 (14 rows).. 425 bu. per acre 

Carman No. I (16 rows) .8n8 bu. per acre 

Rural New Yorker No. 2.310 bu. per acre 

Great Divide.249 bu. per acre 

galzer’s Hundredfold. 160 bu. per acre 


Mr. Field Fays: “As to quality, Carman No. 1 stands first, with No. 3 a 
I close second.” 




















2 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897 


NEW VARIETIES. 

Although many of the so-called novelties that are introduced every 
year are Inferior to older varieties, and some, even, perfectly worthless, 
nevertheless there area few that are really valuable. In order to determine 
which are of value and which are not, we try all the varieties in our Trial 
Grounds, and, if we find one superior in any way to the varieties we 
already have, we offer it to our customers; but we do not offer any varieties 
Just because they are new, and on which we might make a larger profit. 

ALL SEEDS TESTED. 

Many seeds that are sold-especially those placed on sale in country 
stores—are so old or poor that they will not grow. There is no excuse for 
a seedsman who sends out such seeds. It is, however, often done through 
carelessness rattier than with intention to defraud. But such carelessness 
brings serious losses upon the planter of the seeds. In order to be 
absolutely sure that the seeds we offer will grow, every lot of seed— 
* whether it be our own growing or imported—is TESTED, to show just 
what per cent, will grow. Any seeds that do not make a satisfactory 
showing are thrown away. We know, therefore, that all the seeds that 
we send out will grow. 

WE GUARANTEE 

That our seeds will grow, and are pure and true to name, in so far as 
should any prove otherwise, we will return the money paid for same or 
replace with good seed. Our seeds are all thoroughly tested before being 
sent out, so that we know that they will grow. 

WHAT WE OFFER. 

Seeds sent prepaid by mail or express, without cost to the purchaser. 
We pay postage and express churges on all seeds ordered at prices quoted 
in the body of this Catalogue. For prices of seeds in larger quantities to be 
sent by freight or express not prepaid, see wholesale price list, page 20. 

DISCOUNTS ON EA.RGER ORDER 8 .--Ou any order for seeds 
amounting to $ 3.00 or more, we will allow a DISCOUNT of 10 
PER CENT. 7'nis does not, however, include orders for Potatoes 
by the barrel, Field and Grass Seeds, Implements, and Fertilizers. 
ah our prices are us low us uuy, this discount is a direct saving in 
cush. 

To anyone who will get a friend or neighbor to Join with him in 
sending for seed we will allow to per cent, discount on the whole order. 


A GOOD VEG K 

There is nothing on a farm or on country and suburban places that 
will give more satisfaction than a good vegetable garden planted with the 
best varieties In the proper quantities. 

Farmers with ovory opportunity for having a largo, useful garden, ns a 
rule have the smallest and poorest gardens to bo found anywhere. Wo 
know of farmers with hundreds of acres of land and largo famillos, who 
plant a pint of peon, about as many beans, a fow hills of sweet corn and a 
dozen tomato plants, and that is all I 

Let everyone plan to have a good, large gardon t his year and onjoy the 
fruits thereof, Instead of living on pork and potatoes. 

For an ordinary family a garden should contain about the following 
and will require the quantities of seed named : 

Pens— First sowing 100 foot of row—1 quart First and Best or Alaska. 
Hooond sowing lloo feet of row—1 quart Nott’s Excolslor or Little Clem ; 

I quart Heroine or ilorsford's Market (Jurdon; 2 quarts Juno or Cham¬ 
pion of England. 

Lettuce 110 feet of row—1 packet each Iceberg and Deacon. 

Radish 20 feet of row 1 packet ouch BearloL Globo Short Top, White Box 
and Ohurtlor, 

Beets— 50 feet of row—1 ounoo Eclipse, 

Early Potatoes About 1,000 feet of row—1 bushel Early Harvest or Early 
May. 

Parsnlns 100 to 150 feet of row—1 ounce Guernsey Half Long. 


It will pay you to get your neighbors to send for seeds with you. If the 
seeds are heavy they can be sent by freight at a very small cost, and we 
will do up each order separately, with the name of the person for whom it 
is intended marked on the package, and send the whole, securely packed, 
to the person sending the order; or, if the seeds are to be sent by mail, we 
will send each order direct to the person ordering the seeds without any 
further trouble to the person getting up the club. 

Special Offer for Seeds in Packets.— Anyone sending us an order 
for seeds in packets amounting to $1.00, may select 25 cts. worth of seeds 
in packets extra; or, if the order amounts to $2.00, 50 cts. worth extra, or 
25 cts. worth of seeds extra for each $1.00 sent. Please notice that this 
offer is made on condition that the order is for seeds ordered in PACKETS. 
If you order packets to the amount of $1.00 you .may select packets to the 
amount of 25 cLs. in addition. Seeds ordered by the ounce, pint, quart or 
pound must not be included, either to make up the dollar’s worth of seeds 
or the extra 25 cents’ worth. 

HOW TO ORDER. 

jst. Please Use the Order Sheet that will be found attached to 
this Catalogue. 

2 d. Fill in your Name, PostofE.ce, County and State, and if you 
wish any of the order sent by express or freight, give your nearest express 
ofiice or mil road depot. 

3 d. How to Send Money.— The money must in all cases accompany 
the order. We will assume all the risks of the money reaching us if it is 
sent in the form of a postoffice money order, express money order, draft on 
New York, or in a registered letter, to the amount of $10.00, or to the 
amount of $1.00 in an ordinary letter. Fractions of a dollar ma 3 ' be sent 
in postage stamps. 

P. O. Money Orders should be made payable at Moreton Farm, N. Y. 
(Not New York City.) 

4 th. Seeds Sent by Express C. O. D.—lf one-third the amount of 
the order is sent we will forward the seeds by express and collect the 
balance on delivery. We cannot send anything by freight C. O. I), except 
by making sight drafts, which involves a good deal of trouble both to 
ourselves and the purchaser. 

5 th. When Seeds are Ordered by Freight, and there are a few 
seeds that you want early for a hot-bed, you had better order the seeds for 
the hol-bed by mall. The postage is very little. 


ABLE GARDEN. 

8alslfy— 100 to 150 feet of row—2 ounces Mammoth Sandwich Island. 

Onions -100 feet of row-1 ounce Yellow Globe Danvers, or better still, 2 
quarts onion sets. 

Beans-150 foot of row—1 pint Valentine Wax (earliest!; 1 pint Crystal 
Wax (later); :.'<) hills pint) Scotia date pole); 150 feet of row--l quart 
Burpee’s Bush JJma, or 50 hills (1 quart» King of Garden Lima. 

8weet Corn— 50 hills Shaker’s Early; 50 hills Country Gentleman or Ever¬ 
green ; 50 hills Hickox Improved; x / £ pint each kind. 

Cucumbers— 30 hills—1 packet each Siberian, Paris Pickling and Japan¬ 
ese Climbing. 

Musk Melons— 30 to 50 hills—1 packet Grand Rapids, 1 ounce Miller’s 
Cream, 1 packet Melrose. 

Squash— 10 hills-1 packet Giant Crookneck; 10 hills—1 packet Prolific 
Marrow; 20 hills—l ounce Hubbard or Marblehead. 

Tomato-10 to 15 plants—1 packet Early Minnesota; 15 to 20 plants—Poto¬ 
mac or Imperial. 

Cabbage— 25 plnnts—1 packet Early Jersey Wakefield or Etampes; 50 
plant*—Harris’ Short Stem. 

Cauliflower— 50 plants -1 packet Erfurt Earliest Dwarf or Snowball. 

Note.—T he early cabbage seed should be sown In April, and the later 

In May. and the plants set out as soon as large enough. Sow the caull- 

llowcr seed the latter part of May or first of June. 


BOOKS. 


Wo can furnish the following books postpaid at Publisher’s Prices: 
Tnlke on Mnnuree. By Joseph Harris, M. H. Now Edition. 

A practical and complete work on Manures and Fertilizers, 0011 - 
talnlng 40 chapters, ililll pages.Price... $1 76 


Gardening for Young and Old. By Joseph Harris. 

A work on the cultivation of vegetables and llowors. Illustrated. 1 25 

11 Harris on the Plg. M By Joseph Harris. Now Edition. 1 50 

Nitrate of 8odn ns n Manure. By Joseph Harris. IK) pages. 10 

Asparagus Culture. (Flexible Cloth). 60 

Celery for Profit. By T. Urionor. An excellent work on tho subject. 60 

Now Onion Culture. By T. Grloner.. 50 

New Potato Culture. By E. 8. Carman, Editor “Rural Now Yorker” 50 

Gardening for Profit. By Peter Henderson. 1 50 

Onions. How to Raise Them Profitably... 20 

Spraying Grope. How and When to do It. By Prof. Clarence M. 

Weed. 50 

Duck Oulture. By James Kunkin . 50 

Prolfte In Poultry. I 00 

Chemistry on the Fnrm. A book all farmers should rend. It pre¬ 
sents t he relations of ohomlstry to agriculture In a plain and use- 
Ail way... 1 00 


Howto Make the Carden Pay. By T. Greiner. A complete 
hook on Gardening, from making a hot-bed to harvesting the 

crops—written by a practical man. 

Terry’s A B C of Potato Culture. This book thoroughly treats 
the subject of successful and profitable potato growing, and Is well 

worth studying... 

Kalamazoo Celery. Its cultivation and secret of success. 

Cauliflowers and how to grow them.... 

How Crops Crow. By Prof Samuel W Johnson Every one who 
really wishes to know the fundamental principles of plant growth, 
now they obtain food from the soil and air, etc., should read and 
study this book. No one can properly understand fertilizing and 
cultivation of plants unless he knows the facts contained iu this 

book. 

Young Plants. Interesting and valuable to all amateurs who grow 

plants in the house or garden. 

Truck Farming In tho South. An excellent work on Market Gar- 

denlngln the South for the Northern MarkeLs. 

Gregory on Squashes.. 

Book-Keeping for Farmers. Gives a practical and easy method of 
keeping accounts on the farm. 


2 00 


•to 

50 

20 


200 

40 

1 50 
30 

25 


































3 


JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM. N. Y. 


/I\orel:o9 par /r l/e^etabl^ Seeds for 1897. 


On the following pages will be found a complete list of Moreton Farm Vegetable Seeds, arranged in 
alphabetical order, with descriptions and prices. 

NEW VARIETIES. We do not give a separate list of “Novelties,” but have included all the newest and 
best varieties which we have found worthy of introduction, under their proper heads. 

SEEDS DELIVERED TO PURCHASER WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE . When seeds are ordered at the 
prices quoted in the following list, we deliver the seeds by mail or express prepaid, without extra cost to the 
purchaser. IN COMPARING OUR PRICES with those of other seedsmen who make an additional charge 
for postage, this fact should not be overlooked. 

MARKET GARDENERS and others who use seeds in large quantities, will do us a favor by sending us 
their list of wants for a special estimate. We can often make a considerable reduction on some varieties of 
which we chance to have a surplus. 

For prices of seeds in larger quantities see Wholesale Price List on page 20. 

SPECIAL OFFER FOR SEEDS IN PACKETS.—Anyone sending us $ 1.00 for seeds in packets only , may select in addition seeds 
in PACKETS to the amount of 25 cents more, thus getting $ 1.25 worth of seed for $ 1 . 00 . If $ 2.00 is sent for seeds in packets, $ 2.50 
worth may be ordered. If $ 3.00 is sent, $ 3 . 75 , and so on, 25 cents worth additional for each $ 1,00 sent. Please notice that this oiler is 
for seeds ordered in packets only, and does not apply to those ordered by* the ounce, quarter pound or pound. 


ASPARAGUS. 



CULTURE—The best way is to buy the roots from thoso who grow thorn on a largo soalo ; 
but if It is desired to raise them from seed, sow the seed early in the spring In rows do inches 
apart, dropping two or three seeds to the inch. Keep free from woods. The following spring 
transplant the roots to the permanent bod. Tho soil should bo prepared as tor potatoes, and 
given a good dressing of manure or fertilizer. Mark out In rows ;t to 1 foot apart, and place tin* 
roots 2 feet apart in tho rows. Tho roots should bo spread out horizontally and placed deep 
enough in the soli so that when the earth is replaced tho crown of tho roots will bolt inches 
under the surface. If two-year-old roots aro used, tho bod will produce good asparagus tho 
next year after planting. 

ASPARAGUS SEED. 

Columbian Mammoth White—A now variety, tho shoots of which aro naturally white, which 
makes it very desirable for market, where it brings tho highest prices. Lb. $1.00, y x II). 80c., 
oz. 16c., pkt. 10c. 

Conover’s Colossal—Lb. 35c., %lb. l&o., pkt. 5c. 

Palmetto—Large and vigorous. Lb. 50c., % lb. 18c., pkt. fie. 

ASPARAGUS ROOTS. 

Wo have long made a specialty of asparagus roots, growing them on a very largo scale. We 
can furnish flrstrclass roots at tho following low prices: 

Palmetto—There aro a dozen so-called varieties of asparagus, but wo havo nevor boon ablo to 
see any real difference between them. Tho Michigan Experiment Station has tried all the 
varieties offered for a number of years, and reports that there is no apparent difference 
between them, with the exception of Palmetto, which appears to be larger and more 
vigorous than tho others. 


PRICE — 1-year-old roots, postpaid, per doz. 20c., per 100 $1.00. 

2-year-old roots, postpaid, per doz. 30c., per 100 $1.60. 

1- year-old roots, by express or freight, per 100 7fic., per 1,000 $4.00. 

2- year-old roots, by express or freight, per 100 85c., per 1,000 $5.50. 
Conover’s Colossal—Price the same as above. 

BEANS. 

CULTURE—The Early Dwarf varieties can be planted as soon as tho ground is 
warm and danger of frost is over. In this latitude we do not plant until the middle 
of May, and where the beans are grown on a large scale as a field crop it is not best to 
plant before the first of June. Plant in rows 2 to 2% feet apart, dropping the beans 
1 inch apart in the rows. 

NEW VALENTINE WAX. 

THE EARLIEST WAX BEAN. 

We have grown this new Wax Bean for two years, and are convinced that it Is not 
only the earUett variety but that it is superior to the older varieties in many other 
particulars. The pods are long, nearly round, thick, and of a deep, clear yellow. It 
is as nearly “ rust proof” as any Wax Bean we have ever grown, being very little 
affected when others were nearly ruined. Being a direct descendant of the well- 
known Valentine bean it has the remarkable proliflcness of that variety, which 
makes it the most profitable variety for market or canning. I 11 quality it is Jlrut clang, 
being much superior to the Golden Wax. The dry beans are light red, like the 
Valentine. We advise everyone to plant this bean, either for home use or market. 



Qt. 45c , pt. 25c. t % pt. 15c., pkt. 10c. 


NEW VALENTINE WAX BEAN 










4 


HARRIS' RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


BEAN 8 —Continued. 

WARD WELL'S KIDNEY WAX BEAN. 

This Jh one of the very bent Wax,Beans. The pods are 
Jong, straight and handsome, and bright yellow from the very 
beginning. The vines are very vigorous and productive, and 
free from rust. Earlier than Golden Wax or Blaek Wax and 
rnor.t other varieties. We highly recommend this bean for 
either family use or market. Qt. 40c., pt. 23c., y z pt. 12c., pkt.5c. 

NEW STRINGLESS GREEN - PODDED 
BEAN. 

Tills Is certainly a very valuable new Green-podded Snap 
Bean. In our trial grounds it proved to be the earliest green 
bean, with long, round, solid pods that were perfectly strlnyless 

and of line quality. We 
think this will supersede 
all other green-podded 
bush beans now in culti¬ 
vation, as it is superior in 
all points. Qt. 50c, pt. 
i£f>c„ % pt. 15c., pkt. 10c. 




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WARDWELL'S KIDNEY WAX BEAN. 


CLEVELAND'S IMPROVED VALENTINE BEAN, 

Ibis Is a great Improvement on the old Valentine, being not only of belter quality and more productive but a 
week or ten days earlier. The pods are perfectly round, thick-fleshed, solid, and nearly stringless, and are of the 
finest quality. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c„ ^ pt. 12c., pkt. 6c. 

STANDARD VARIETIES OF DWARF BEANS. 

CRY8TAL WAX- The best quality of any Wax Bean. Pods round, solid, and nearly transparent. Cooks tender 
and of delicious flavor. Qt. 50c., pt. 25c., pt. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Golden Wax-One of the best market varieties. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c„ y 1 pt. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

Black-Eyed Wax— One of the very earliest and best. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., y, pt. 12c.. pkt. 5c. 

Black Wax— The old “ Butter Bean ; n quality the very best. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., pt. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

Refugee, or 1,000 to I -Used largely for canning and pickling. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c , ^ pt 12c pkt 5c 
Early Mohawk-Green pods. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., % pt. 12c., pkt. 6c. 

WHITE FIELD BEAN. 

Boston 8mall Pea Bean-Very productive. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., % pt. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

Boston Marrow—Beans largo; cook dry and mealy. Qt. 40c, pt. 22c., y pt. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

Marrow Pea, or White Navy -The earliest White Bean. Qt. 40c , pt, 22c., pt. 12c., pkt, 5c. 

POLE BEANS. 

Golden Flagolot Wax— Very prolific; pods long, golden yellow, and of finest quality. Will bear until frost. Qt 
00c., pt. Mo., % pt. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

8pecklod Cranberry, or London Horticultural— Used largely for succotash. Qt. 55c., pt. 30c., y A pt. 18c., pkt. 5c. 

8cnrlot Runner-Makes beautiful screens 10 to 12 feet high, with abundance of scarlet blossoms. Pods excellent 
for the tablo. Qt. (Kk;., pt. Me., y A pt. 20c., pkt, 5c. 

THE SCOTIA BEAN. 

The Finest-Flavored, Tenderest and Most Delicious Snap Bean. Do Not 

Fail to Try It. 

Wo want everyone who iipprcoluto n really good “ snap » bean to try the Scotia. We know of no bean that 
equals It In tenderness and jinc flavor . The pods arc long, perfectly round, solid, and perfectly sir'mulcts, and light 
green In color. The vines are wonderfully productive and Inclined to run, so that they can be grown on poles or 
allowed to run on the ground, as most convenient. When only a few hills are grown it is best to give them a short 
polo to run on. 

Wo obtained tho.se beans from Nova Scotia. They are very distinct in appearance, and we have never seen 
anything like thorn. We have hundreds of testimonials as to tlielr quality and productiveness from all parts of 
tho country. All who have tried them are enthusiastic In their praise. QL 05c., pt. 35c., y pt. 20c., pkt 10c 


LIMA BEANS. 


THE SCOTIA BEAN, 


OULTTJllR.-Tho dwarf varieties should be planted in rows 2 % to 3 feet apart, dropping the beans 2 Inches 
apart. A light soil Is best. Do not plant before the soil Is warm and danger of frost is past. Plant the pole 
varieties In hills 3 feet apart. A polo should be set beforo the beans are planted, Place 8 to 10 beans in a circle 
around each polo anil cover 1 Inch deop. When they are well started, thin to 3 plants to a hill. 























JOSEPH HARRIS CO, MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


5 


LIMA BEANS—Continued. 



BURPEE’S BUSH LIMA BEAN. 

Troublesome poles for Limn Beaus are no longer neces¬ 
sary. Burpee’s Bush Lima grows only 18 inches high and is 
no more trouble to raise than dwarf wax beans. ’ The pods 
and beans are nearly if not quite as large as the pole varie¬ 
ties and of equally good quality, and about a week earlier. 
Bears until frost. Everyone should plant at least a pint, and 
a quart would be much better. Qt. 50c., pt. 28c., ^ pt. loc., 
pkt. 10c. 

HENDERSON'S BUSH LIMA. 

Smaller, but two weeks earlier than Burpee’s and won¬ 
derfully productive. When sown at the same time they give 
a supply of beans from the earliest possible date until frost. 
These small beans are of the finest quality. Qt. 45c , pt. 
25c., y. pt. 15c., pkt. 10c 

POLE VARIETIES. 

King of the Carden.— The largestand best filled pods. Very 
productive. Qt. 45c., pt. 25c., % pt. 12c., pkt. 10c. 
Large White Lima.— Choice seed. Qt. 45c., pt. 25c., % pt. 
15c , pkt. 10c. 


BURPEE'S BUSH LIMA BEAN. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

The sprouts grow on the stem of Lho plant, as shown in the engraving, and are liko miniature 
heads of cabbage, about as largo as the ond of your thumb, but sometimes larger. Those little heads 
are picked off In the fall and winter and cooked like cabbage. They aro Improved by having a 
dressing of “drawn butter” pourod over them when served. Brussels Sprouts aro becoming very 
popular and are profitable to grow for markot. Thorp Is always a good demand for them. 

CU LTUltE —The cultivation of Brussels Sprouts Is similar to that of cabbage. The seed should 
be sown in this latitude about the middle of April and the plants set out about the first of Juno, in 
rows three feet apart and the plants two feet apart In the rows. In the fall the plants should be bent, 
down and covered well with straw or leaves and earth, or they may betaken up and stored In a shed 
or out-building with their roots in earth. An ounce of seed will produce 2,000 plants. 

Improved Dwarf.— Per lb. $1.50, y { lb. 50c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

HALF DWARF PARIS MARKET. 

Decidedly the best variety. A vigorous grower, with unusually largo and very solid sprouts. 
Per lb. $2.00, lb. 65c., oz. 20c., pkt. 10c;. 


BRUSSELS SPROUTS, HALF DWARF PARIS MARKET. 


BEETS. 

CULTURE.—Sow as soon as the ground can be worked, in rows 16 to 20 Inches apart In light soil 
that has been well manured or fertilized. A mixture of equal parts of superphosphate and nitrate of 
soda will produce wonders on beets ; apply broadcast before sowing the seed. When the beets come 
up, thin to 3 or 4 Inches apart. An ounce of seed will sow about 60 feet of row—6 to 7 lbs. of seed per acre. 

ECLIPSE BEET—An Extra Fine Strain. 

There are new beets introduced every year but we have found none superior to our strutn of 
Eclipse. It is the earliest and handsomest beet in existence. The beets are globe-shaped, smooth, and 
with very small top, and are of the best quality. Lb. 65c., y+ lb. 20c., oz. 8c., pkt. 6c. 

13 Bushels from I Ounce of Seed. Mr. E. B. Barnett, .South Columbia, N. H.,says: “ I bought 
one ounce of Eclipse Beet seed of you last year for trial, and mined 13 bushels of as nice beets as I ever 
saw. There wasn’t an ill-shaped beet in the whole lot, and in quality they are the finest.” 

Egyptian Blood Turnip.— A standard variety, very early and of the finestquality. Beets fiat and very 
dark red Lb. 65c., % lb. 20c., oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 

Extra Early Bassano.— Very early, of excellent quality. Lb. 55c., y+ lb. 20c., oz. 8o., pkt. 5<\ 

Bastian's Blood Turnip.— A very large early beet of excellent quality. Its size recommends If for 
market. Lb. 55c , y lb. 20c., oz 8c. pkt. 5c. 

Early Blood Turnip.— We have an excellent strain of this old favorite. Lb. 55c., y lb. 20c., oz. He., 
pkt. 5c. 

Long, Smooth, Blood Red.— Boots long, smooth and very dark red. Lb. 55c., % lb. 20c., Oz. 8c«, 
pkL 5c. 



ECLIPSE BEET. 













6 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


Mangel Wurzel or Sugar Beets. 

FOR STOCK. 

Milk producers are beginning to Kee the value of 3Iangels as food for milch cows. They are 
especially valuable to feed in the winter and early spring, when the cows need an appetizer of this 
kind. Every sheep-breeder should also raise Mangels, as there is nothing so good for ewes with 
young larnbs. 

CULTURE —Sow in May in rows 2 to 234 feet apart. The land should be plowed deep and well 
worked The seed can be sown with a grain drill, but a garden seed drill is better. The seed 
should be dropped about an inch apart in the row. When the beets come up. thin out to JO or 12 
Inches apart. The land for Mangels should be made rich either with manure or fertilizer, or 
' " ‘ * * ' * tsoinE—'-- ' ... ... 


both. Amixtureofe< 


, , f . . nitrate of soda and superphosphate sown broadcast and worked 

Info the soil before the seed Is sown, at the rate of 300 to 500 pounds per acre, will often double the 

crop. Use 5 to 7 pounds of seed per acre. 

Giant Yellow Intermediate Mangel.— This Mangel combines more good points than any other 
vari tty we have ever grown. The shape is shown in the cut (from a photograph). The flesh is 
yellow, fine grained and nutritious. In a test of six of the leading varieties, the Giant Inter¬ 
mediate led them all, giving a yield of 1,800 bushels per acre. The roots are smooth, grow 
more than half above ground and are easily harvested. Lb. postpaid 10c., 34 lb. 15c.. pkt .*>c • 
0 lbs. or more by express, 25c. per lb. 

Harris'Yellow Globe Mangel.— The finest strain of Yellow Globe Mangel in existence. Roots 
perfectly round, smooth, and with very srhall top. Will keep better than any other variety. 
Lb. postpaid, 40c., 34 lb. 15c., pkt. 5c.; 5 lbs. or upwards by express, not prepaid, 25c. per lb. 

Golden Tankard— Large size and fine quality. Lb. 45c., 341b. 18c., pkt. 5c.; 5 lbs. or upwards by 
express, not prepaid, 20 c. per lb. 

Mammoth Long Red or Norblton Giant.— The best long red Mangel. Yields enormously 
lib. 40c., 34 lb. 15c., pkt. 5c.; 5 lbs. or upwards by express, not prepaid, 25c. per lb. 

Imperial 8ugar Beet -The best sugar beet to grow for stock. Roots large, smooth and very rich 
Being much richer in sugar, their feeding value is nearly double that of the large-growing Man¬ 
gels. Grows partly out of the ground. Lb. 40c., 34 lb. 12c., pkt. 5c.; 5 lbs. or upwards by ex¬ 
press. not prepaid, 2 ,5c. per lb. 1 J 

Lane's Improved Sugar Beet.— A fine strain of sugar beets for stock. Lb. 45c. 34 lb. 15c pkt 

“ 0 c. per lb. 

sugar, often containing 14 per cent. Seed from 


5c.; 


; 5 lbs, or upwards by express, not prepaid, 30c. per lb. 
Vllmorln's Improved Sugar Beet.— The richest in sugar, oft 
the originator. Jib, 50c., *4 lbi 18c„ pkt. 5c. 


CORN SALAD. 

CULTURE.-Kow In rows 15 inches apart as soon as the frost Is out of the surface soil In six 
or eight weeks the plants are ready for the table, For early spring use, sow In September as you 

BO Hplrificii, 

Lurge Round-Leaved.—The best variety. Lb. C0c„ V v lb. 20c., oz. 10 c , pkt 6 c 

CELERY. 

CULTURE.—For carh/ use, sow the seed In a box or liot-bed in March, an 
plant* when 2 Inches high In another bed 2 to 3 inches apart. Set, out in the open i 
t can he gotten In good condition. For fall and winter use. sow t.hn Honri in 


and transplant the 
ground as soon as 

fun ...i 




7 the seed In rows 14 inches apart. A dress- 
pounds per square rod. Water the bed If the 
The land should be given a good dressing of 
to should be scattered along the rows before 
to 10 inches high, draw earth around it to 
of the row as close as possible to the celery 
pits or cellar before hard frost. 



GIANT. PASCAL CELERY. 


GIANT PASCAL CELERY. 

Ibis celery Is remarkable for the thickness of the stalks, their crispness and line flavor and 
ong-cooping qualities. It.isa “giant" in the size of the stalks rather than in height It Is a 
remarkably strong grower and will keep all winter when properly stored. We consider this 
one of the best varieties for winter use. Lb. $1.75, 34 lb. 50c., oz. 18c., pkt. 10c. 

OUR GILT-EDGE STRAIN OF 

GOLDEN SELF-BLANCHING CELERY. 

Wo have taken great pains to got a perfectly pure strain of this magnificent celery, and nowi 
are ablo to offer seed of our own growing from carefully selected stalks, every green one being 
irown out. llils seed Is so pure that It is hard to find a green stalk in a whole field of celery 
grown from it. 


solid VbLlkH wh Pt, V,‘rnl.H bcsL “ H °lL b / an Jr h " celery. It grows to a medium height with large 

ir ol clon-vollow ontor of nil?Uina of H 1 r hnest flavor. Its distinguishing feature is the beautiful 
Turn So^don-vnHnw nnrt lca Y, cs - kven without any banking up the leaves and stalks 

n ’ ,1,1< I 1, J r eiyrtlic I up, the outside stalks turn white, while the inside stalks 
" vMrioK. U fnr S’nmi v J n? \ tho wliolostalk a most attractive appearance. It is certainly the 
$100 V O7 30c r °pkt l(T n<l 0,1 r ,v wntor llS0 or for market. Will keep all winter. Lb. $3.50, *4 lb 


Y ~V l llC( Principally for early use. When very slightly earthed up, 
T in nil! Vni la In? !? 0 lea \ cs tur y perfectly clear white, giving It a very handsome appearance 
lb! 05oox*20c pVt 8 *H)c° d ’ nordoes 11 ke °P as well, as Golden Self-Blanching. Lb. $2.25, 

Por n??i!5,? , H ® nrtwe, I—Large and solid. A very popular market variety, by many considered 
the best large green sort. Lb. $ 1 . 75 , 34 lb. 50c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. considered 

V w 8tan(Iard celery for winter use. Stalks large, compact, white on outside with 
beaut iful golden-yellqw heart. A splendid keeper. Lb. $1.50, 34 lb! 40c., oz. Kc. pkt 5c 

vory so,m 

Boston Market Of branching lmblt, solid and* fine flavor. Lb. $1.50 34 lb. 40c., oz. 15c. pkt. 5 c 
CELERY PLANTS-See our prices, page 20 . 

CELERIAC, or TURNIP-ROOTED CELERY. 

l! 1 ® us ^rederv, except that it is not necessary to earth it up or plant so far 
apait Set the plants in rows 2 feet apart and 8 inches in the row 1 1 

Colerlac, Erfurt Largo Early-The best variety. Lb. $2.00, 34 lb. GOc., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

















JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


7 


CABBAGE. 



HARRIS' SHORT STEM. 


SOLID EMPEROR. 


MORETON FARM CABBAGE SEED IS THE FINEST GROWN. 


We have long made a specialty of growing improved strains ol cabbage seed. Having been largo growers oi 
cabbage both for seed and market, we realize the great importance ol using well-bred seed. There is no crop, with 
possibly the exception of the onion, that is so much influenced by the quality ol the seed used as the cabbage. It is so 
easy to raise seed from poor, loose heads of cabbage, or even from the stumps alter the heads have been cut and sold, that 
a great deal of poor seed is annually sold, the purchaser being tempted by the low prices at which such seed is offered. 

All our seed is grown from large, well-matured, perfect heads, and will consequently produce such when 
given the proper care. We have fields of our Short Stem Cabbage in which the heads run so even in shape, size and 
solidity that it is hard to find one in a hundred that lias any imperfection. 

CULTURE —For very early cabbage sow seed In hot-beds in this latitude about March 1st. As soon as the land can bo worked, set out the plants on 
rich soil in rows 2*4 feet apart and the plants 18 to 21 inches apart, In the rows. The land should bo heavily manured or given a llbeml dressing or a 
mixture of nitrate of soda and superphosphate. Some cabbage growers on Long Island uso 1,000 pounds of each per acre. _For early fall use, sow 
Henderson’s Summer or Succession In the open ground as early as possible and t ransplant as soon as plants aro largo enough 
use, sow the largo varieties from the first to the middle of May and transplant the plants from Juno nth to July loth. In rc 
way. Any good corn or potato land will raise cabbage. Llbeml fertilizing or manuring will pay well. . 


For Inte fall and winter 

... w .. -own 2J4 to 8 foot, apart each 

An ounce of seed will produce about 2,001) plants. 


HARRIS' SHORT STEM CABBAGE. 

The Best Large Late Cabbage Crown— (Sec Cut). 

We have grown and improved this Cabbage by careful selection for 
over 20 years, and think there is no Cabbage equal to it for fall and 
winter use, either for home use or market. The heads grow uniformly, 
very large, deep and solid, and are of the very finest quality, They will 
keep better than any large Cabbage we know of, being very much superior 
to common varieties in this respect. , 

We have tills Cabbage bred so well that 99 plants out of every 100 will 
produce good solid heads if given good ground and proper care. Yields 
of 15 to 20 tons per acre are not at all uncommon with this variety and even 
larger yields are possible under favorable conditions. Seed from extra 
selected heads, lb. 32.25, 34 lb. 65c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

DANISH WINTER CABBAGE. 

SOLID EMPEROR— (Sec Cut). 

After trying many varieties of Danish and German Cabbage we are 
satisfied that the Danish “ Solid Emperor” is the best variety or strain of 
Cabbage which is imported into tills country from Holland and Denmark 
and which brings double the priceof common Cabbage in our markets, and 
therefore introduced this variety last year. We regret to say that many 
fields of this and other Danish varieties were nearly a failure this season on 
account of aphides and subsequent blight, which attacked the outer leaves 
cansing them to turn brown and drop. The blight was much worse on 
early set plants than on those set out later. Plants set out after July 1st 
produced excellent crops. This is theflrst time we have had any trouble 
with blight and we presume it will notoccur again soon. 

The Solid Emperor is the hardest and heaviest Cabbage we have ever 
grown. It is also very uniform and a sure header. Under favorable con¬ 
ditions not one plant in 500 will fail to produce a perfectly solid head. 
Although the heads are not as large as some other varieties they are so 
solid and heavy that they weigh nearly as much as the larger heads, and 
will yield nearly as many tons per acre. Lb. $3.25, 34 lb. 85c., OZ.25C., pkt. 10c. 


HOLLANDER—Danish (See Cut ). 

This is one of the hard heading Danish or Holland Cabbages, which 
sell for high prices in our market. This variety, the Solid Emperor, Intro¬ 
duced by us lost year,and the Danish Bail-head, aro all very similar to 
each other and only differ in a few minor points. The “Hollander” is 
flatter and wo think a little larger than the other Danish varieties and 
has the same solidity of head and long keeping qualities of the nail-head 
and Emperor. Considering the high prices obtained for these Cabbage 
they are undoubtedly the most profitable to raise when they can be given 
first class land and kept until late in the winter or early spring, Reed 
imported direct from the most reliable growers in Denmark. Lb. $8.26, 
34 lb. 85c , oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

BURPEE'S ALL-HEAD EARLY. 

This Is a large early Cabbage, much resembling Henderson's Summer, 
but somewhat larger and earlier than that excellent variety. The beads 
are very uniform In size and shape, and all mature at the same time. 
Lb. $2.26, J4 lb. 05c., oz.20c„ pkt. 6c. 

Our 8peclal Improved 8traln of 

EARLY JERSEY WAKEFIELD CABBAGE. 

Wc have a very/ fine strain of this variety, which beads the earliest and 
most uniformly of any cabbage. The beads are of good size, very solid, 
and witli few outside leaves. We recommend tills strain to market 
gardeners as the very best. Lb. $8.00, 34 lb. 85c., oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

8TANDARD VARIETIE8 OF CABBAGE. 

Succession Cabbage— This Js a remarkably finely-bred cabbage. The 
heads are of good size and shape and have very few and small outside 
leaves. Nearly every plant will produce a good head. Fora medium 
early cablmge it Js unequaled. It can be set out as late as the first of 
August, and matures before November 1st. It is one of the finest 
cabbages we know of, and we highly recommend It, both for medium 
early and late crops. Lb. $2.00, 34 60c., oz. 20c., pkt. 6c. 











8 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


CABBAGE—Continued. 

All Seasons— Becoming very popular both for medium early and late 
crop. Heads large, solid and remarkably even In size and shape. 
Lb. $2.00, 24 lb. 60c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

ETAMPE8 A very early pointed-head cabbage of the finest quality for 
home use, being very tender and fine flavored. Lb. $2.00, 24 lb. 60c., 
oz. 2-»c., pkt. 5c. 

HENDERSON'S EARLY SUMMER— The earliest Drumhead cabbage. 
We have a very fine strain that heads early and very evenly. Lb. $2.00, 
24 lb. 60c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

Newark Early Flat Dutch— An early strain of Flat Dutch cabbage. A 
little later than Henderson’s Summer, but larger. Lb. $2.25, 24 lb. 65c., 
oz 20c., pkt. 5c. ' 

Early York— Pointed heads, of very Hue quality. Excellent for home use 
Lb. $2.25, 24 lb. 05c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

Wlnnlngstadt— Good size, hard, pointed heads. Every plant will head. 
Lb.$2.00,24 lb. 00c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

FOTTLER’8 DRUMHEAD, or Improved Brunswick— One of the best 
for fall and winter use. Heads large and solid. Earlier than Flat 
Dutch. Lb. $2.00 ,14 lb. 00c., oz. 20c , pkt. 5c. 

Premium Flat Dutch-An excellent large, late cabbage. Lb. $2.00, 24 lb. 
00c,, oz, 20c., pkt. 5c. 

EXCEL8IOR LARGE FLAT DUTCH— A very flue strain of Flat 
Dutch cabbage. Heads large and solid. Lb. $2.00, 24 lb. 60c., oz. 20c., 
pk t. 5c. 

Perfection Drumhead 8avoy— The Savoys are much superior to other 
Cabbage for the table, being nearly equal to cauliflower in delicacy of 
flavor. This Is the best variety. Lb. $2.25,24 lb. 05c., oz. 20c , pkt. 5c. 
MAMMOTH ROCK RED— A new large Drumhead red cabbage. Heads 
nearly as large as Flat Dutch, and very solid. Often brings much 
higher prices In market than other cabbage. Lb. $2.50, 24 lb. 70c., 
oz, 25c., pkt. 5c. 

Early Red Erfurt— An early Red cabbage. Heads round and very hard. 
Fine for pickling. Lb. $2.25, 24 lb. 65c., oz. 20c. ( pkt. 5c. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

CULTURE-For early crop treat the same as for early cabbage. Care 
should he taken not to let the plants get checked in their growth as this 
will cause some heads to form prematurely. For late crop the time of 
sowing the seed depends upon the variety. The early varieties, If sown In 
May and set out July 1st, will form heads In September or first of October. 

'J he later varieties Hhotihl be sown and put out earlier. The land for 
cauliflowers should he moist and made rich with manure or fertilizer. 

THE IMPORTANT POINT There is nothing so ossontlal to success 
as yood need. The best cauliflower seed Is very expensive, hut It is worth 
to the grower ton times what cheap and carelessly-grown seed Is wort h. 
Wo got the host results from using Snowball or Erfurt Earliest Dwarf for 


main late crop, as well as for early use. These two strains of seed, as we 
have them, are grown with the greatest care, and 95 per cent, of the plants 
will produce fine, compact heads of good size. 

Mr. J. M. Long, East Winthrop, Me., says; 11 The Erfurt Earliest 
CauhfU>v:er I (jot of you was as fine ox I ever raised, and every plant headed .” 

Mrs. Chrissie Hannah says: “ Your cauliflower seed was perfectly (jrand. 
Notwithstandiny the drouyht the cauliflowers were the finest in the county .” 


ERFURT EARLIEST 


DWARF CAULIFLOWER. 


This cauliflower is sold 
under a great many different 
names, as nearly every seeds¬ 
man has a name for it with 
his own attached. But we do 
not see that the names im¬ 
prove the cauliflower. At 
any rate there is certainly 
nothing finer than the strain 
we offer. The heads are very 
compact, well covered with 
leaves, and of large size, and 
nearly every plant will form 
such a head when given good 
culture. For forcing eai ly In 
the spring it has no equal; 
and by sowing the seed at 
different times cauliflower 
can be obtained as early or 
as late as wanted. 24 lb. $11, 
oz. $3.25, 24 oz. $1.75,24 oz. SI, 
pkt. 15c., 2 pkts. 25c. 



ERFURT EARLIEST DWARF CAULIFLOWER. 


SNOWBALL CAULIFLOWER. 

This variety Is very similar to Erfurt Earliest Dwarf, but with, perhaps, 
somewhat smaller leaves. We have the yenuine seed of the purest strain of 
this variety. Nearly every plant will form a fine, compact head. 24 lb. 
$10 00, oz. $3.00, 24oz. $1.75, 24 oz - 66c., pkt. 15c., 2 pkts. 25c. 

ERFURT EARLY DWARF— Not quite as early or fine as Erfurt Earliest 
Dwarf, but is an excellent variety both for early and late crop. It is 
very reliable In regard to heading, and the heads are solid and compact, 
24 lb. $7.00, oz. $2.00, pkt. 10c. 

Early Parls-An old favorite. 24 lb. $2.00, oz. 60c., pkt. 10c. 

Walcheren —Large, late and very hardy. Will stand considerable frost. 
24 lb. 82.00, oz. 60c., pkt. 10c. 

Large Algiers-One of the best large lato varieties. Heads of the largest 
size, white and compact. A very reliable header. 24 lb. $3.00, oz. 90c., 
pkt. 10c. 

Large Lonormand Short Stem —Largo and a vigorous grower. 24 lb. $2.00, 
oz. 0’c., pkt. 10c. 



HARRIS' HALF.LONQ CARROT. 


CARROTS. 


CULTURE.—Th° land should be rich, a sandy loam or muck is best. Plow deen and work 
Moroughlv. Sow In rows from 14 to 2i Inches apart, the latter distance will allow the use of a 
orso cultrvfttor. Thin the plants to 3 or 4 inches apart in the row a dressing of ^101) pounds 
,. |° ^. k °m 11 P® r after tho plants are weeded and thinned out is of the greatest Benefit 

Whloh wlU - eood yield. One'cSsSS 


HARRIS' HALF-LONG CARROT. 

Wo luivo made a specially of this Carrot for many years and tblnk there Is nothing better 

I lie roots grow from (i (o 8 Inches long, only slightly smaller at the bottom than at the top, and 
so smooth and oven that a heap of them looks ns though each carrot was turned out of a mold. 
In sort land they can ho pulled out without digging. They keep well and are sweet and nutri- 
ous. Everyone who 1ms horses or cows should raise a patch of these carrots. They are the best 

or lab n *“ U,e w,ntor , when there is >>° green food. They are also excellent 

lor lablo use. Lb. 80c., 24 lb. 2oc., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

OOO BUSHELS PER ACRE. 

Mr. Ecklmrd Leon of Eric county, N. Y., wrote us Octobers, 1895: “ Your Half-Long Carrot 
seed h Me best kind I have had in a longtime. I had on a short quarter acre ”5 Impels or 
about 0 tons of carrots, fine color, smooth and nearly ull alike.” ’ 


MASTODON CARROT. 

A LARGE WHITE CARROT FOR STOCK. 

A very large white carrot which should supersede the old white Belgla 
UN It yields more, Is more easily harvested and Is of belter quality Th 
roofs grow very laryc, being thick at tho top and not too long, so that the 
can be easily pulled. Wo think this variety will yield more good nutrition 
carrots per.acre than any other variety. Lb. 75e.. «, lb. 2fie„ oz. 10c„ pkt. 5< 
OXHEART or GUERANDE -A short, thick ennot, often nearly as larg 
mound as It Is long, Excellent for table use or “bunching” forth 


market. Can he easily pulled up by hand, and will yield nearly as 
much as the longer varieties. Lb. 90c. t 24 lb. 25c., oz 10c., pkt. 5c. 

Early French Short Horn-The best for forcing. Lb. $1.00, 24 lb. 30c., 
oz. 10c., pkt. 6c. 

Long Orange -We have a tine strain of this variety; roots long but not 
oo tapering, smooth and straight. An Immense yielder. Lb. 75c., 
* 4 lb. 25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 


Large White Belgian-Very large; grows partly out of the ground; 
green tops. Will yield more than the yellow varieties. Lb 65c M lb 
J0c. f oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. * * 










JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM. N. Y. 


9 


CUCUMBERS. 


tv. , s be ?.^ p,an f in hills 4 feet apart each way, using S or 10 seeds to a hill. When well started thin to 3 or 4 plants. 

!\ C nH r? 1 onL f 1 \ L P ,ant s wlto pyrethrum powder or lime infused with turpentine. For Pickles, sow in July in hills, or bettor still. 

1 rfL* Pi*” 1 ery .% ? r 8 } n , ch , es - The seed can be drilled in with a “ Planet Jr.” drill. A piece of mucky land or drained swamp 
is excellent for this crop. The \ ines should be picked over every other day. Pickles are often very profitable. 


NEW SIBERIAN CUCUMBER. 

THE EARLIEST. 

Of all the varieties in our test garden the 
past season, the Siberian produced the tirst 
cucumbers of edible size. The cucumbers are 
nither short, thick, straight and smooth, and 
of first-class quality. This is the best early 
cucumber we have ever seen. Lb. Toe.. 34 lb. 

25c., oz. 15c., pkt. 10c 

JAPANESE CLIMBING CUCUMBER. 

After two years’ trial of this cucumber we 
are convinced that it is one of the best varie¬ 
ties either for table use or pickling. Although 
the vines will climb if given an opportunity, 
they do perfectly well on the ground like 
other cucumbers. Their vigor of growth and 
healthy foliage are quite remarkable. The 
cucumbers are long, straight, dark green, and 
veru wild and crisp. Season medium to late. 

Very prolific. Lb. $1.50, 34 lb. 50c.. oz. 20c., 
pkt. 10c. 

COOL AND CRISP CUCUMBER 

This new variety remained green longer 
than any other variety: in fact, they do not get 
ripe at all before frost. The cucumbers are 
long, straight dark green and very solid and 
crisp. Excellent for pickles as well as for table 
use. Lb. $1.00, lb. 30c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

NEW EVERBEARING CUCUMBER. 

The peculiar merit of this variety lies in the fact that it will start to 
bear small cucumbers early and keep on producing them whether the 
others arc picked or not. This makes it a valuable variety for pickles. 
Lb. 00c., 3* lb. 30c., oz. 10c , pkt. Cc. 

NICHOLS' MEDIUM GREEN. 

Medium in length, straight and handsome. One of the best cucum¬ 
bers for pickles, home use or market. Lb. 55c„ \\ lb. 20c , oz. 10c., pkt 5c. 


PARIS PICKLING 

CUCUMBER. 

This is called a “pickling” cucumber, and 
is undoubtedly valuable for this purpose,being 
long, slender and crisp and dark green, but In 
our opinion thero is no cucumber equal to it 
for slicing for table use. When thecucumbers 
are 8 to 10 inches long t hey are notover 1 or 1)4 
inches in diameter, and so solid, crisp and fine 
flavored that they can be picked oft* the vines 
and eat en wit hout dressing of any kind. This, 
wethiuk, could hardly he said of any other 
variety. For pickles it is unsurpassed. When 
3 or 4 Inches long it is hardly thicker then a 
lead pencil, and perfectly solid and crisp. 
Lb. $1.75, V, lb. 50c , oz. 20c., pkt. 10c. 

GIANT WHITE CUCUMBER. 

This is a wonderful cucumber. It grows 
from 15 to 20 Inches long, perfectly straight, 
and of a beautiful creamy white color from 
the time if Is an inch long until full grown. 
When half grown they aro magnificent for 
slicing, being crisp, tender and of the finest 
flavor. For exhibition purposes thero is noth¬ 
ing that will attract more attention than a 
few full-grown specimens of this giant of cu- 
cumbors. 34 lb. "5c., oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

STANDARD VARIETIES. 

Wc offer choico strains of seed of the following well-known varieties at 
the uniform price of G5c. per lb., *4 lb. 20c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

Improved Long Green— Excellent for plcklos or slicing. 

Tallby’s Hybrid— A cross between Whito Hplno and a long English forcing 
cucumber. 

Early Green Cluster— Fine for pickles. 

Early Russian Very early, short, solid and crisp. 

Early Frame -Best for forcing. 

Green Prolific Very productive. Excellent for pickles. 

Early White Spine— very popular for market, pickles and home use. 



SWEET CORN. 


CULTURE.—Sweet Corn requires richer land than fleld corn to 
develop it in perfection. A liberal application of manure or fertilizer will 
pay well. Plant In rows 3 feet apart and hills 2 feet apart In the rows. Do 
not plant until the ground is quite warm. 

NEW WHITE CORY CORN. 

The Cory is the earliest sweet corn. There are others that some claim 
to be earlier, but with us they have not proved so. The New White Cory, 
obtained by selection from the Cory, is equally ai early, and has the addi¬ 
tional advantage of while kernels and cob. Qt. 40c., pt 22c , *4 P l * 15c.. 
pkt. 5c. 

SHAKER'S EARLY SWEET CORN. 

THE BEST EARLY SWEET CORN FOR HOME USE OR MARKET. 

We have raised this corn for years and have never found any varieties 
equal to it. It is a second early variety, coming on right after Cory or 
Marblehead, and is as early as Minnesota, but with ears twice the size, and 
corn of better quality, being deliciously sweet, succulent and tender. 
There is no better variety for home use or for market. Wc sell large 
quantities to canning establishments, who find it a very superior variety 
for their purpose. Qt 35c , pt. 10c., % pt 12c., pkt. 5c. 

" COUNTRY GENTLEMAN” SWEET CORN. 

A new variety of remarkably fine quality. The kernels are arranged 
irregularly on the cob and are very deep , the cob being very small. Its 
great merit lies In the delicious sweetness, tenderness and fine flavor of the 
corn, which Is unsurpassed by any other variety. The corn matures rather 
late and remains green a long time and is very prrAific, 3 or 4 ears often 
being produced on one stalk. Qt. 40c . pt. 22c., 34 pt. 15c., pkt. 5c. 


PRICE OF THE FOLLOWING 8TANDARD VARIETIES. 

Prepaid by mail , quart 35 c., pint S0c„ half pint 12c ., packet 5c, 

CORY— The earliest variety. 

Perry’s Hybrid -A little later than Cory, but larger and of belter quality. 
Sweet and tender. Red cob. 

Crosby’s Early - Good size and fine quality. 

HICKOX IMPROVED— A little earlier than Stowcll’H Evergreen, very 
large 12-rowed cars; kernels large and deep and of the very bent quality. 
We consider this the best late variety for home use or for market. 

COLD COIN-The latest variety. Will remain sweet and tender longer 
than Evergreen. We have used It a week after a hard frost und after 
the stalks hud been cut, and found ittendcrand delicious. The kernels 
even when young aro golden yellow, very deep and 14 to 18 rows to the 
cob. This variety prolongs the sweet corn season at least a week after 
others are gone. 

Stowell’s Evergreen— The standard late corn. We have some fine pure 
seed. 

Black Mexican— A delicious corn, but objected to on account of the dark 
color of the kernels, but for fine quality It is unsurpassed. 

PARCHING, or POP CORN. 

Cultivate the same as for other corn. In growing It on a large scale we 

plant in hills 3 feet apart and 4 plants in a hill. It is a profitable crop. 

White Rice Pop Corn— This Is the very best variety. The ears are 0 to 7 
inches long and 4 inches In circumference. Yields well, is sure to pop 
and produces a large and beautifully white mass of the richest and 
highest flavored pop corn. Qt. 40c , pi. 22c., 34 pt* 12c., pkt, 5c. 








10 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897 


CHARD, or SEA KALE BEET. 

Swiss Chard Is a beet grown for its leaves. The mid-rib when boiled 
makes delicious greens, or the leaves may be boiled and served as spinach. 
No garden should be without it. Sow early in the spring on rich land, or 
give a little nitrate of soda. Thin the plants'out to G Inches apart. 

8wlss Chard, or 8ea Kale Beet— Lb. 50c , % lb. 18c., 025 . 8c., pkt. 5c. 


HORSE RADISH. 

Horse Radish is easily grown from sets—small lengths of roots. These 
sets, if planted in the spring in good rich soil, will form large roots by fall. 
The sets should be planted with the small end down and the upper portion 
two Inches below the surface. 

SETS— Postpaid by mail, 25c. per doz„ $1.25 per 100; by express, 80c. per 100. 


COLLARDS. 

Col lards, or Coleworts, are extensively grown in the Southern States, 
where they furnish green food for the table or for stock all through the 
winter as well as other seasons. The seed Is sown at different times, from 
the last of May until the first of August. Bet out and cultivate like ordi¬ 
nary cabbage. 

Collards, or Coleworts—The best of seed. fib. $1.10, lb. 35c., oz. 12c., 
pkt. 5c, 

CRESS, or PEPPERGRASS. 

Bow early in the spring in rows a foot apart. Sow at intervals of two 
weeks for succession. 

EXTRA FINE CURLED— The best variety. Lb. 40c., % lb. 15c., oz. or 3 
pkts. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

True Water Cress— Sow it in the greenhouse or scatter the seed on the 
side of a ditch or shallow stream where there is running water. Lb. 


Endive is used for 
salad, especially in 
autumn and winter. 
It is easily grown. 

CULTURE.—For 
early use sow as soon 
as the frost is out of 
the ground in rows 15 
inches apart. Thin 
out the plants to 10 
Inches opart in the 
rows. For fall and 
winter use sow at dif¬ 
ferent times from the 
first of June till the 
middle of July. 

Green Curled Hardy and handsomely curlod loaves. Valuable for salad 
and garnishing, Lb. $1.75, % lb. 50c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

Moss Curled A beautiful variety with very finely curlod leaves. 
Planches perfectly white In the center. Lb. $2.00, % lb. 00o., oz. 20c,, 
pkt. 5o. 

EGG PLANT. 

This Js a delicious vegetable and 
should he In every garden. It Is also 
a profitable market crop. 

OULTUllK,- Now thosood in April 
for earlier In t he Mouth > In a box In llu* 
house or hot-bod. When the plants 
gel tliolr second leaves transplant 
them Into pots or hot-bed fra in oh. Ah 
soon as danger of front Ih over, set out 
the plants In the open ground II feel 
apart eaeh way, In rich land, 

HEW YORK IHIPROVED EGG PLRNT. 

Now ThornleoH Strnln. 

This Is a Hiiporb strain of Mils well- 
known and popular variety. If Is not 
only thornloHH, which Is quite an ad¬ 
vantage, but II. possesses all tho other 
requirements, such as curliness, pro- 
llfleness, and large size and handsome 
shape of fruit, which go In make up a 
perfect egg plant, Lb. $4 (X), lb. $1.10, 
oz 40o„ pkt. 10c. 

BLACK PEKIN One of the best varieties for homo uso. Tho plant Is a 
vigorous grower and productive. Fruit very large, perfectly round ; 
color very dark purple, almost black. A little earlier than New York 
I mproved Purple, and fully equal to It In quality and flavor. Lb. Si (X) 

Li lb. $1.10, oz. 40o,, pkt, 10c. 

Extra Early Dwarf Purplo A valuable variety. Not largo, but very early 
and prolific Lb $1.75, lb. $1.00, oz. UTk\, pkt. 10c. 

Early Long Purplo-Kurly and very productive. Lb. $2.15, H lb 70c 
03. 20c„ pkt. 5o. 



$4.50, lb. $1.26, oz. 45c., % oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

ENDIVE. 



-- 

ENDIVE, GREEN CURLED. 


KOHL RABI. 

Kohl Rabi Is a remarkable vegetable. To many it will be quite a 
curiosity. It looks as though it was half cabbage and half turnip. The 
leaves can be fed to cows like cabbage, while the bulbs resemble the Swede 
Turnip, and are relished by horses and other animals. It is also grown 
as a garden vegetable for the table and the market. 

CULTURE.—So win rows 2 feet apart, and thin out to 10 inches apart in 
the rows. For a large crop for stock, sow a little earlier than Swede Turnip 
say in May or first of June. For table use, where quality rather than size 
is desirable, sow a little later. 

Large Green— This variety is usually grown for stock. It Is also good for 
the table. Lb $1.75, K lb. 50c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Early White Vienna— The best variety for the table, also excellent for 
stock. Quality excellent. Cook as you do turnips. It is drier than the 
turnip, and of delicious flavor. Lb. $2.00, % lb. 75c., oz. 25c., pkt. 5c. 

KALE, OR BORECOLE. 

Next to Brussels Sprouts the Kale, tbougli extremely hardy, is the 
most delicate of the cabbage family. It is grown precisely as cabbage. It 
is the tender shoots that are so delicate and delicious. They are better after 
a few frosts in the fall. With a little protection, or ■when the snow is deep, 
they will stand the winter and afford a constant supply of “greens” all 
through the winter and early spring. 

Dwarf Curled Green— The best dwarf variety. Lb. $1.25, Mlb 40c. oz 
15c., pkt 5c. 

Tall Green Scotch Curled— Lb. $1.25, % lb. 40c.. oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 


LEEK. 

CULTURE.—Sow early in the spring in trenches 6 inches deep and 20 
inches apart. Drop two or three seeds to the inch of row. When up thin 
to 0 or 8 inches apart. Fill up the trench as the plants grow. Or the seed 
can be sown in beds and transplanted to the trenches when a few inches 
bill The soil should be made very rich and the plants given as much 
moisture as possible. The Leek will be ready to use In October. 
Musselburgh— The largest of all varieties. Lb. $2.00, %lb. 60c, oz. 20c., 


oz. 15c, pkt. 6c. ’ ' ° A * *’ 

Large American Flag-Grows to a good size, and Is straight and uniform 
and of the best quality. Lb. 82.IX). % lb. 00c., oz. 20c.. pkt. 10c. 


LETTUCE. 



CULTURE.-For caHy use sow In hot-bed in rows 3 or 4 inches apart, 
and thin tho plants to 2 or 3 Inches apart In the rows, or sow thicker and 
transplant to these distances. For summer use, sow in open ground as 
early ns possible In rows 12 to 14 Inches apart, and thin the plants to from 
3 to 10 inches apart In the rows. The large-head varieties require the most 
room. 


NEW ICEBERG LETTUCE. 


This now let¬ 
tuce forms largo 
heads very early 
In tho season and 
continues crisp 
and tender for a 
long time. Tho 
leaves are light 
green, nearly 
white In tho cen¬ 
ter of tho head, 
thick, crisp, and 
w 11 h o u t bitten 
ness. 

Wo b ighly 
recommend this 
lottuco for early 
summer use. 

14 lb 50c., oz. 
20c , pkt 10c. 


NEW ICEBERG LETTUCE. 


DENVER MARKET LETTUCE. 

This Is one of the best varieties, either for forcing or out-door culture. 
1 he leaves are curled and wrinkled like a Savoy cabbage, which gives it a 
very attractive appeamneo. The quality is very fine, being crisp, tender, 
and without bitterness. The color is light-green, nearly white inside the 
head. I.b. $1 r>, lb. 45c , oz. 15c„ pkt. 5c. 









JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETdN FARM, N. Y. 


11 


GRAND RAPIDS LETTUCE. 

This new variety is one of the best for either forcing or out-door culture. 
It is distinct from other varieties in being of upright growth and with very 
large mid-ribs to the leaves, which are white and nearly as crisp as celery. 
The leaves are large, of an attractive light green and beautifully curled. It 
will stand a long time without going to seed, and keeps fresh and green 
for a long time after cutting. Lb. $1.25, }4 lb. 45c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

DEACON LETTUCE. 

We are the original introducers of this magnificent lettuce, which has 
gained for itself great popularity. It is the finest large-head lettuce in 
existence. The leaves are smooth, thick and tender, and inside the head 
are nearly perfectly white, and of the finest quality. It is important that 
it should have plenty of room to grow. Thin out the plants to 10 or 12 
inches apart in the rows, and you will have magnificent heads. Lb. $1.75, 
}4 lb. 50c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

BLACK-SEEDED SIMPSON— Similar to Early Curled Simpson, but 
nearly twice the size A very handsome lettuce, popular in market. Lb. 
$1.25, lb. 40c , oz. 15c., pkt. oc. 

Cos Lettuce, Paris White— The best Cos Lettuce. The outside leaves 
should be tied together to blanch the inner ones. Lb. $1 50, L, lb 45c., 
oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 



BOSTON MARKET, 
or White Seeded 
Tennis Ball— The 

best head lettuce 
for forcing. Round, 
compact heads of 
attractive light 
green, and of finest 
quality. Lb. $1.50, 

. }£ lb. 45c., oz. 15c., 
pkt, 5c. 


Early Green Tennis 
Ball — Black seed¬ 
ed. Similar to above 
but darker green. 
Lb. $1.26, %lb. 40c., 
oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 


Early Curled Simp¬ 
son-Largo, very DENVER MARKET LETTUCE, 

handsomely curled leaves. Lb. $1.25, }4 lb. 10c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 


MUSK MELONS. 


It is much easier to grow Melons than is usually supposed, and they 
arc so delicioti's a fruit that it seems strange to us that every one who has 
any garden at all does not raise them. All that is required is a good rich or 
well-manured soil that is not too heavy, and a warm, sunny situation. 

CULTURE.—Plant in hills not less than 4 feet apart each way, or 6 feet 
one way and 3 or 4 feet in the rows. This gives a betterchanee to use the 
horse hoe between the rows. In addition to manuring the whole land, a 
half bushel or more of well-rotted manure should be thoroughly worked 
into the hill before planting. If the manure is not well mixed with the 
soil the hill will drv out. Sow a dozen seeds in each hill and thin out to 
three or four strong plants in a hill. I f striped bugsappear, treat as recom¬ 
mended for cucumbers. To tell a ripe musk melon , take hold of the stem 
and shake slightly. If ripe the stem will separate from the melon. When 
a melon gets yellow it Is overripe. 

A NEW EARLY MUSK MELON. 

“GRAND RAPIDS.” 


MELROSE MUSK MELON. 

Wo have found the Melrose to bo an exceptionally fine flavored melon. 
The flavor is so strong, sweet and delicious that other melons scorn insipid 
in comparison. The melons are oblong, of medium size, dark green and 
thickly netted. The flesh is green, thick, and of the richest flavor. \4 lb. 
50c., oz. 20c., pkt. 10c. 

NEW COSMOPOLITAN MUSK MELON. 

This excellent melon is the result of years of careful and intelligent 
selection of sood stock, and Is so finely-bred that ovory melon Is a model In 
appearance and a paragon of sweetness and flavor. The melons are round 
and very thickly netted. The flesh Is green, thick and sugary and of the 
finest flavor. Wo recommend this melon for market or homo use as one of 
the very best green flesh varieties. It is also'ono of the earliest. Lb. $1.50, 



GRAND RAPIDS MUSK MELON. 


14 lb. 40c., oz. 20c., pkt. 10c. 

MILLER'S CREAM, or " OSAGE" MUSK MELON* 

A MOST DELICIOUS MELON. 

Wo know of no musk melon that Is so uniformly good as this. With 
most varieties some melons are very good while others aro poor, hut. the 
Miller’s Cream Melons aro always very sweet and high flavored. This mag¬ 
nificent melon has few equals for quality and productiveness. The melons 
aro oval, dark green and slightly ribbed. The flesh Is a beautiful orange or 
salmon color, and so thick, sweet and high flavored, It will bo a revelat ion 
to those who know only the ordinary musk melons. Lb. 80c., 14 lb. 25c„ 
oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 


CHAMPION MARKET MUSK MELON. 

A very handsome, largo netted melon, oval and slightly ribbed. Very 
uniform in size and shape and of the very best keeping qualities, which 
makes It an excellent market and shipping melon. Our strain of tills 
variety is very lino. Lb. $1.25, \4 lb. 35c., oz. 15c,, pkt. 10c. 

Price of the following; 8tandnrd Varieties i 
Lb. 75c., \4 lb. 21c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

NEW EARLY HACKEN8ACK— An early strain of the well-known 
Hackensack. One of the best green-fleshed melons for home use or 
market. 

Hackensack -The most popular market melon, round, ribbed and 
thickly netted, handsome and of fine flavor. Our strain of this variety 
Is very fine. 

Emerald Cem —A most delicious melon. Flesh salmon color, thick, deli¬ 
ciously sweet and high flavored. Fruit, round, dark green, slightly 
ribbed and of medium size. Very productive. 

MONTREAL MARKET— When well grown this is one of the largest, 
handsomest and best flavored Wlons. It is rather late and requires 
high culture, but will repay for the extra trouble by producing magnifi¬ 
cent fruit of the largest size. Thickly netted and deep ribbed. Flesh 
green, very thick and high flavored. 

NETTED CEM-One of the earliest melons. Fruit medium size, ovaland 
thickly netted, green flesh, very sweet and high flavored. Vines very 
prolific. A very satisfactory variety for inexperienced growers 
White Japanese-/! remarkably high flavored melon. Bo strong is the 
flavor, in Tact, that It Is objected to by some on this account, but by 
others considered delicious Fruit round, cream colored with orange 
colored flesh. Our stock of this variety Js exceptionally fine. 

Casaba- The largest musk melon. Of fairly good quality. 

Fine Green Nutmeg— An old favorite. 

Prolific Nutmeg -Round, thickly netted and handsome. 


The new Grand Rapids Musk Melon proved to bo the earliest melon 
among all the varieties In our test last season. It Is not only extremely 
early but the melons are of very large size. The flavor is not quite as strong 
and sweet ns Miller’s Cream or Emerald Gom,but it is very good. Its 
earliness, large size and handsome appearance will, wo are sure, make it a 
very profitable market variety, and it will also bo very acceptable to tlioso 
who have trouble In getting the later varieties to ripen before frost. The 
melons are oblong, netted and of a light green, turning to nearly yellow 
when ripe. The flesh is pink or light salmon color, thick, sweet and good 
flavored, Every ono should plant at least a few hills of Grand Rapids. 
Lb. $1.50 ,14 lb. 45c., oz. 20c , pkt. 10c. 















HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


12 


WATER MELONS. 

CULTURE.—The sarneas for rnu.sk melons, except that the hills should 
be farther apart., say 8 feet one v/ay and 4 feet the other. The best land is 
sandy Joarn, made very rich witn manure or fertilizer. 



FORDHOOK EARLY. 


FORDHOOK EARLY* 

A NEW EARLY WATER MELON. 

Many people in the North have wished to raise water melons, but have 
been prevented from doing so on account of the difficulty In getting them 
to ripen before frost destroyed the vines. To these the Fordhook Early 1 
will ho a boon. It is at least two weeks earlier than any other good, large 
variety, while the quality Is of the very host. The fruit Is oval In shape, 
and grows to a large size. The flesh Is a bright red, sweet and fine 
flavored. Lb. $1 25, y lb. 35c., oz. 15c., pkt. 10c. 

HUNGARIAN HONEY WATER MELON. 

One of tho steeliest and finest flavored of all water melons, and also early 
and productive. The melons are perfectly round, dark green, and of 
medium size. Flesh bright red, solid and very aweel. We lilghly recom¬ 
mend this melon for home use. Lb. $ 1 .00, y lb. 30c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

Price of the following standard varieties of water melons, postpaid : 
Eh. 70e., % lb. 22c., oz. 10o„ pkt. 5o. 

VOLGA A very sweet, solid-fleshed melon. Hi pens early, and is produc¬ 
tive, Fruit as round as a ball and very light green, almost white; 
flesh bright, red, firm, solid, sweet and fine flavored, 


MAMMOTH IRONCLAD— Very large, handsome, oblong melons; daj k 
green beautifully striped with lighter green. Flesh firm, solid and 
sweet, and surrounded with a very hard and tough though thin rind, 
which makes it valuable for shipping. 

Kolb's Gem— This is the large, handsome melon commonly seen in our 
markets. Fruit nearly round, handsomely marked with light and 
dark green stripes, and is of excellent quality. 

Cuban Queen— One of the largest and finest melons. Much resembles 
Kolb’s Gem. 

Early Mountain Sweet— Large, early and productive. 

Ice Cream— While-Deeded, early, and delicious flavor. Fruit round and 
very light green. 

CITRON MELON FOR PRESERVES. 

Everybody should plant a few citrons for preserves. Cultivation 
similar to water melons. 

Green Citron, for Preserves— Round, striped and handsomely marbled. 
Very hardy and productive. Red seed. Lb. 8 oc., y lb.25c., oz. lCc., 
pkt. 5c. 

Mushroom Spawn. 

English Spawn— In bricks of one pound each In much better shape for 
mailing than the French spawn. Lb., by mail, 28c.; by express, 20c. 
per lb. 

Mustard for Salad. 

Sow in rows a foot apart, and hoe frequently, and cut when three or 
four inches high. Sow as early as the ground can 
be got In good condition, and every two or three 
weeks afterwards, for succession. Get three 
packets. 

White London— Leaves light green, mild and 
tender. Lb. 40c., % lb, 15c., oz. 8 c., 3 pkts. 10c., 
pkt. 5c. 

Okra or Gumbo. 

Used for thickening and flavoring soup. The pods contain a large 
amount of gum which imparts a thickness and softness, as well as a fine 
flavor to the soup. It Is very easily raised, and should be in every garden 
The pods should be picked when young and strung on a string to dry, 
when they will keep all winter and can be used at any time. Directions 
for use can be found in any good cook-book. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed in the open ground as soon as it is warm 
and danger of frost Is over, in rows 15 to 20 inches apart, and thin out the 
plants to about a foot apart In the rows. An ounce of seed will sow 30 feet 
of row. 

Dwarf White —Lb. 75c., y lb. 25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

WHITE VELVET— A distinct and valuable variety. The pods are large, 
round and smoolh, and not ridged like the old varieties. Lb. 80c, 
y lb. 25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 



Moreton Farm Superior Onion Seed. 


There i« nothing so essential to success in growing Onions as WELL BRED SEED. That is, seed grown from 
good, sound, well-shaped Onions that mature early and without thick necks. Such is the Seed we offer. It is all 
grown from Onions selected with the greatest care, and will produce Onions that for handsome shape, solidity and 
early maturity can not be excelled. It is hardly necessary to say that there is a great deal of poor seed sold. Many 
people every year who arc induced to buy such seed by highly-colored pictures and descriptions or low prices, find their 
crop half scullions, and suffer a loss of hundreds of dollars by trying to save a few cents on the seed. 

At the following prices we will send the seed prepaid by mail. For prices of seed to be sent by express see page 20. 
If five pounds or more of seed are required, please write for special prices on quantities and varieties wanted. 


\!„.1 ntl . , ral , No 11 KO0 . (1 or °p <>r potatoes will grow Onions, provided i 

Mfuinie and foitlllzorH together give tho host results. Glvo the hind 11 good dressing of well-rotted 1 
deep. 1 hen imply brondouHt a dressing of 500 pounds of superphosphate and 100 pounds of muriate 


it is not te>o heavy and is well manured or fertilized, 
manure and plow it under, running about six inches 

If nuooNBuryrok'oWl'uny rubbish tfu^^ 

sow about. four pounds pornoro. Wood us soon us tho onions appear, and after weeding npply n dressing S o® 300founds of nitre teo ° soda 

plvlmr tho nltm to linfnrn xmv nor 1 hn unm nc 1.. iimi nnoaiL _uiinue 01 «oaa 


broadcast. Tin'sIshotter Umnapplying the nit rate before sowliig U 16 seed, us in that rasoWeNV7cdi w'lYf be R^de ^erowverv mnidTv' ! «nrt renn?' 


per acre 

.. _Jt taken 

very important point. 


WHAT THEY SAY OF OUR ONION SEED. 

. E * °* Poar8n1, of Uutt, ° 0pcok » Iowa ’ writes, Nov. 16,1806: “ The seeds you sent me gave the very best of satisfaction • 

especially the Off Ion seed (harly Sauthpnrt % lied Globe and Yellow Globe Danvers ), which were simply perfect 

“ P/ri * NWEST EVER RA ISF,D."- Mr. Goo. Atwood, of Morrlnmok Co., N. II., writes: “ From the two ounces Onion seed I got from you I had 
Tflnr hush eh of the largest and nicest Onions that were ever raised inthis section. All your seeds came up splendidly , and went ahead and did well." 





JOSEPH HARRIS CO., 'MORETON FARM. N. Y. 

YELLOW GLOBE DANVERS ONION. 


13 


EXTRA SELECTED STRAIN. 

Thisistne most popular Onion for market or home use. Very handsome in shape and color; matures early, keeps well and is firm and of mild, 
pleasant fla\or Our strain of Ijhis variety is remarkably fine, of the true, globe-shape, and so well bred that it is hard to find a scullion or poor onion in 
ten thousand. It has yielded as high as 900 bushels per acre, and 500 to 600 bushels is not an unusual crop. Don’t buy cheap seed of this variety. To 
zet the good prices for onions they must be of perfect shape and of uniform color. This can only be obtained from the most carefully grown seed, which 

fiinnnt hp cnlrl of vorv lr»vt» ..— i _ ...... ...... * 0 ’ 


cannot be sold at very low prices, 
$1.50, lb. 40c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 


A\ hat is saved in the cost of the seed is lost ten times over in the crop. New seed, crop of 1890, prepaid by mail, lb. 



YELLOW GLOBE DANVERS ONION. 


YELLOW GLOBE DANVERS ONION. 

BEST CALIFORNIA CROWN SEED. 

Po those who do not wish to pay a little extra for our finest strain 
of Yellow Globe Danvers Onion, we offer this seed, which is equal to any 
seed ofTered except the above named. It is the same that is sold by all the 
most prominent, seedsmen of the country. Lb., postpaid, 90c.. Li lb. 28c., 
oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

EARLY SOUTHPORT RED GLOBE ONION. 

The Southport Red Globe has long been considered the best Red Globe 
Onion. Its large size, perfect globe shape, and best keeping qualities, 
make it a very desirable variety. Its only fault was its lateness. 

The new Early Southport Red Globe possesses all the valuable qualities 
of the older variety, and has the additional merit of being much earlier. 

It will mature as early as Yellow Globe Danvers or Red Wethersfield, and 
is a far handsomer Onion than the latter. Lb.$1.40, }4 lb. 10c., oz.lSc., pkt 5c. 

“ PRIZE TAKER ” ONION. 

The largest and handsomest Yellow onion grown. This is the large yellow Spanish onion so common in our 
markets, and so highly prized for its mild and agreeable flavor. To raise these immense, handsome onions to 
perfection, the seed should be started in a hot-bed or box in the house, and the onions transplanted to the open 
ground ns soon ns It can be nmdo in good condition. Wo offer a fine strain of American grown seal, which is 
much superior to imported seed for this country. Lb. $2.00, )i lb. 00c., oz. 20c., pkt 10c. 



Early Southport Red Globo Onion. 


NEW EARLY BARLETTA ONION. 


THE BEST ONION FOR PICKLING. 



This remarkable lit¬ 
tle onion Is a wonder for 
rapidity of growth and 
early maturity and ev¬ 
enness in size and shape. 

They are the handsom¬ 
est and most perfect 
white pickling onion we 
have ever seen. When 
sown thick they will 
grow to about the 
size of a cherry, perfect¬ 
ly round, pearly white, 
and of very mild flavor. 

They are a profitable 
crop to grow for market, EARLY BARLETTA ONION, 

as they often bring $2.00 and $3.00 per bushel. The seed can be sown as late 
ns July 1st and mature a crop before fall. Lb. $2.00, % lb. 00c,. oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 


Round Yellow Danvers— The same as Yellow Globe Danvers, except that 
the onions are a little flatter. It is one of the best varieties to sow for 
sets as well as for large onions. Lb. $1 00, % lb. 30c., oz. 12c., pkt. 6c. 

Red Wethersfield- The standard Red onion. Large and heavy yieldcr. 
Lb. $ 1 .20, % lb. 35c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Early Large Red— A very early fiat onion. The best where seasons are 
short. Lb. $1 50, % lb. 40c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Southport White Globe— A magnificent large white onion, perfect globe- 
shaped and very solid. It requires a long season and rich land, but 
when given these will yield a large crop of the handsomest onions 
grown, which bring the highest prices in market. We have seed of a 
very fine strain of this variety. Lb. $2.50, \\ lb. 75c., oz. 25c., pkt. 6c. 

White Portugal, or Silver Skin— An early flat wbitconion with mild and 
pleasant flavor. White onion sets are nearly all of this variety. 
Lb. $2.50, M lb. 75c., oz 25c., pkt. 5c. 


HARRIS’ RED GLOBE— A very large handsome Red onion, of perfect 
globe shape and very solid. Requires early sowing and rich land; given 
these it will produce the largest and finest. Red onions grown. Will 
keep until late in the spring. Lb. $2.00, \\ 00c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

GIANT ROCCA— An Italian onion of very largo size and delicate flavor, 
of light-brown color and globe shapo. .Succeeds best south of Phila¬ 
delphia, where It will produce Immense crops. Lb. $1.76, lb. 60c., 
oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

ONION SETS. 

Onion Sots arc used to produce Onions earlier than they can be procured 
from seed. By using sots, large, ripe onions can bo hud In July, and green 
“bunching” onions early In the spring. 

CULTURE.-—Set out the sets In rows 16 to 20 inches apart and 2 Inches 
apart In the rows. The land should be rich and kept perfectly free from 
weeds. A quart of our sets contains about 300 sets and will plant 60 feet of 
row. It requires from 10 to 15 bushels to plant an acre, depending upon the 
distance the rows are apart, and the sets in the rows and tin* size of the 
sets. 

We raise large quantities of Sets on our own farm and cun furnish 
very small sound clean sets at the lowest rales. Please write for special price* 
by the bushel or Itarrcl. 

Yellow Sets— Prepaid by mail, qt. 35c., pt. 20c. By express, not prepaid, 
quart 20c., peck 80c. 

White Sets (Silvcrsklnj—Prepaid by mail, qt. 4Ue., pi,22c. By express, 
not prepaid, qt. 25c , peek $1.00. 

Potato Onion Sets -Will produce large, handsome, yellow, ripe onions 
In July or first of August. They never go to seed. The sets are larger 
than those grown from seed. Prepaid by mail.qt. 46c., pt.25c. 
Egyptian, or Perennial Tree Onion -This is a distinct kind of onion 
that when once started will come up every year as soon as the frost Is 
out of the surface soil, and will produce green bunching onions earlier 
than any other variety, and requires very little care. If the sets are set 
out in the spring they will divide and produce five or six new green 
onions the next spring from each set Bets by mall, qt. 30c., pt 18c. 
By express, qt.20c , peck 85c. 


SPECIAL LOW PRICES TO LARGE BUYERS. 

To all who use large amounts of Onion Seed, Onion Sets, Cabbage and other vegetable seeds and Seed Potatoes 
we shall be glad to quote special prices by letter on the quantities and varieties desired. 

Special attention is called to our Seed Potatoes, of which we have some very fine stock of the best varieties. 
Write us for prices before placing your orders elsewhere. See what we have, pages 21 and 22. 













14 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


P EAS. ^ ^ 


Our Seed Peas are all grown in the northern part of this State and in Canada, and are of the EAREIEST 

and HARDIEST as well as the PUREST Strains. 

PLEASE NOTICE that our price# include Postage. For prices of Peas to he sent by Express or Freight not prepaid, see Page 20. 


Cin/n/RE.—The extra ear\y xrn/>olh varieties, like First and Best of Alaska, can be sown as soon as the frost is out of the ground. The wrinkled 
varieties, which are marked thus <*), should not be sown until the ground is warm, for, if it is very cold and wet. the seed will rot. Sow in rows 3 feet 
apart. A quart will sow 100 feet of row. 

NEW DWARF PEA—Nett's Excelsior. 

Tills new early Dwarf pea has proved itself to be larger and more productive than American 
Wonder, wliJle equally as early as this variety, which has long been regarded as the earliest 
Dwarf Wrinkled pea. It iscertainly the/lnest early Dwarf pea that we have ever seen, and we 
are confident that it will take the place of American Wonder, which, although a very early 
and line-flavored pea, Js not productive enough to suit the ordinary gardener. Nott’s Excelsior 
overcomes tills objection, and in tills variety we now have an early and productive pea, with 
vines that grow only a foot high and need no stakes or brush. Everyone should give this 
new pea a trial, (it., postpaid, 50c., pt. 28c., y 2 pt. 15c. 

HEROINE PEA. 

Tills Js one of the best medium early peas we have yet grown. The vines are strong and 
vigorous, growing about three feet high. The pods, which are produced in great abundance, 
arc very large, being often five Inches long, and well filled with large wrinkled peas which, 
when cooked, are of the very best quality, sweet and delicious. We advise everyone who 
wants a really good pea to sow at least a quart of the Heroine. Postpaid, qt. 40c., pt. 22c., % 
pt. 12c. 






"JUNO " PEA. 




HORSFORD’S MARKET GARDEN PEA. 

An cnormowily productive variety. Vines grow about two feet high and are 
covered with large, well-filled pods. The peas are large and of fine quality# and 
mature very evenly. It is medium early, and one of the best varieties for market 
or home use. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., y pt. 12c. 

"JUNO” PEA. 

This Is a magnificent large “ main-crop ” pea, growing only about two feet high, 
so that it docs not require supports. The pods are very large and filled right out to • 
the tip with largo dark-green peas, which are very sweet and tender even when nearly 
matured. The vines are very prolific and continues in bearing a long time. Season 
medium to late. We think this the best pea of its season. Qt. 50c., pt. 28c., % pt. 15c. 

STANDARD VARIETIES—EARLY. 

Alaska Pea—This is the earliest pea. In our tests it matured one or two days before 
any other strain of early peas. The pods are long, and filled out to the end. and 
mature so evenly that the whole crop can be picked at two pickings. The peas, 
when ripe, are light blue, which distinguishes them from other early peas, which 
are all merely strains of the old Kent pea. Qt. 40c M pt. 22c., y pt. 12c. 

First nnd Best—A very fine and improved strain of Early Kent or Daniel O’Rourke 
PJ a J». I °cls well filled, and mature very evenly, and, with possibly the exception 
ol Alaska, Is the earliest pea in cultivation. Qt. 35c , pt. 20c , y, pt. 12c. 

+ McLEAN’S LITTLE GEM—The standard Dwarf peas Grows 18 inches high, and 
produces an abundance of large pods well filled with peas of delicious quality. 
Unsurpassed for homo use or market. Qt. 40c.. pt. 22c., y pt. 12c. 

♦ Extra Early Premium Com—One of the best and earliest Dwarf peas. Does not 

kindling, iuid produces largo well-filled pods and peas of the finest quality. 
til. lUo., pt. 22 c., y 2 pt. 12 c. 

♦ Amorloan Wonder—-The earliest. Dwarf Wrinkled pea. Grows less than a foot high. 

I ods very large and peas of finest quality. Qt. 45c.. pt 25c., y pt. 15c. 

Blue Peter-Very dwarf, early and productive. Qt. 10c., pt. 22c“ y pt. 12c. 

MEDIUM AND LATE VARIETIES. 

♦ Bliss’s Abundance—Twenty inches high, bunching from the roots. Very productive. 

Largo pods and fine quality. Medium early. Qt. 10c., pt. 22c.. y pt. 12c. 

♦ Yorkshire Hero-—Two and one-half feet high, bearing an abundance of very large 

well -111 led pods Quality excellent. One of the best main-crop peas for market 
or homo use. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., y pt. 12c. 

♦ STRATAGEM -The largest and finest late pea. The pods are immense and filled 

with peas ot the largest size and finest quality. The vines are very robust, two 
feet high and bear profusely. Do not sow until the ground is quite warm, and give 
the best of care. Qt. 45c., pt. 25c., y pt. 16c. 

deliciously sweet pea. Bears very large pods in great abundance. 

\ lues three foot talland very vigorous. If you wantthe mostdelicious. sweet, fine- 
tlavored peas that wore ever grown, plant the Telephone. Qt. 40c., pt. 22c., y 2 pt 12c. 

♦ Champion of England-Still the standard for quality and productiveness. Very 

tew now varieties arc equal to the Champion. Qt. 35 c., pt. 20c., % pt 12c. 

DWARF WHITE MARROWFAT—An Improved strain of Marrowfat peas. Vines 
not so tall as the old Marrowfat, but more productive of large, well-filled pods. 
Qt, 85©., pt. 20c., y pt 12c. 

Largo White Marrowfat—Popular In market. Not as good quality as the wrinkled 
peas. Qt. 80c., pt 18c., y pt. 10c. 

Black-Eyed Marrowfat—Mime as above, except that the peas have black eyes. 
Qt. 80o , pt. 18c , y pt. 10e. 

•Tall Sugar- Kdihle pods. Can bo eaten without shelling, ns the pods are sweet and 
tender. QL 60c., pt. 25c., y pt, 15c. 


















































JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM, N. Y 


15 


^ 4 PUMPKINS. 




CULTURE -The usual method of growing the 
large yellow held pumpkins is to plant them 
among corn To do this the seed can be mixed 
with the corn before planting, or, which is 
much better, the pumpkin seed can be pressed 
into the soft soil at every third hill in every third 
row after the corn is planted. Put three seeds in 
a hill. Much finer pumpkins can be grown by 
planting and cultivating the same as squash. 

CALHOUN PUMPKIN. 

MAKES THE BEST PUMPKIN PIES, 

This is the finest pumpkin for pies that we 
have ever grown. It does not grow very large 
but the flesh is often three inches thick and very 
solid, so much so that it does not require boiling 
down like other pumpkins. The pumpkins are 



LARGE CHEESE PUMPKIN. 


round, ribbed and of a light cream color. The 
flesh is thick, sweet and fine grained. Lb. $1.00, 
1 , lb. 30c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

Large Cheese —Finegrained and sweet. Large 
fruit, mottled light green and yellow. The 
best variety for the south. Lb. 50c., 34 lb. 15c., 
oz. 3c., pkt. 5o. 

Connecticut Field— Tho common large yellow 
pumpkin. Tho best to grow among corn for 
stock feeding or pics. Lb. 35c., 34 lb. 15c., 
oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 

Mammoth Potlron— {Also called Kino of Mam¬ 
moths and Jumbo Pumpkin)—The largest 
Pumpkin grown, ofton weighing 200 pounds 
Salmon colored skin, flesh thick and of good 
quality. Lb. $2.50, 34 lb. 70c., oz. 20c., pkt,10c. 


PARSNIPS. 



CULTURE.—The best laud is 
sandy loam or muck. It should 
be plowed deep and wellworked. 
Sow the seed in rows 20 inches 
apart and thin the plants to i 
inches apart in tho rows. Can 
be sown as late as tho middle of 
June, but May is tho best time 
to sow. An ounce of seed will 
sow 150 feet of row. 

IMPROVED GUERNSEY 
HALF-LONG-This line strain 
of Parsnip is a great improve¬ 
ment on the old long varieties. 
Our cut gives a good Idea of 
its shape. The roots arc very 
smooth and oven in shape, 
easily dug, and arc line grain¬ 
ed! sweet and tender. Wo tako 
great pride In our Improved 
strain of this variety, and 
highly recommend it for both 
market and home use. lib. 
55c., lb. 20c., oz. 8c., pkt, 5c. 

Long Hollow Crown- Long, 
smooth and straight, and of j 
line quality. Lb. 60c., 34 lb. 
18e„ oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 


PARSLEY. 


CULTURE.—Sow in rows 15 
to 20 Inches apart early in the 
spring. Thin out the plants to 
3 or *1 inches apart The seeds 
germinate very slowly and care 
should be taken that weeds do 
not smother the young plants. 
The plants can be taken up in 
the fall and planted in a box In 
:ie house or light part of the cellar, and will furnish nice parsley all 
rinter. 

Jhamplon Moss Curled-The handsomest and finest curled and fringed 
variety. Lb. 85c., 34 lb. 25c., oz. 10c , pkt. 


Extra Double Curled-A beautiful finely curled parsley. Very dark green 
Lb. 80c., 34 lb. 2cc„ oz. 10c., pkt. 5c 


POTATOES. 

SEE WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER, PAGES 21 AND 22. 

J 


PEPPERS. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed in a box in tho liouso or hot-bod In April. 
Before the plants bogin to crowd, prick them out Into a larger box and give 
more room. If necessary to keep them back before tho ground is ready 
outside, transplant again. About tho first, of Juno sot them out. In rows 
two and ono-lialf foot apart and eighteen inches apart in tho rows. 

GOLDEN DAWN -Tho 
best and largest yellow 
variety. Tho poppers 
when ripe are of a beau¬ 
tiful golden yellow, of 
line shape and of a 
sweet, pleasant flavor. 

Early and productive. 

Lb. $3.00, 34 lb. 00c , oz. 

30c., pkt. 10c. 

NEW CELESTIAL—A 
very ornamental pep¬ 
per from China. Tho 
peppers, before they are 
ripe, arc creamy white 
and change when ripe 
to a bright scarlet, so 
that there are both rod 
and white peppers on 
the plant at tho.same 
time, presenting an at¬ 
tract i v o a ppeamncc. 
oz. 30c., pkt. 10c. 

CAYENNE -Best for sea¬ 
soning pickles. Enormously productive. Tho peppers nro long ana 
slim, bright red when ripe, and of sharp, pungent flavor. Lb $2.50, 
34 lb. 73c., oz. 25c., pkt, Be. 

Ruby King-A magnificent, large, red pepper. In shape like the Golden 
Dawn (see cut). The vines are vigorous and very productive; tho fruit 
sweet, remarVably mild and of excellent quality. Lb. 81.00,34 55c., 

oz. 30c., pkt. 10c 

LARGE BELL, or BULL NOSE -One of tho hardiest, earliest, largest 
and best varieties. Bright red, thick flesh and very mild. Lb. $2 50, 
34 lb. 75c., oz. 26c , pkt 5c. 

PROCOPP’S GIANT The largest of all poppers, growing six to eight 
Inches long. Peppers bright red, thick flesh, excellent for pickles. 34 lb. 
$1.00, oz. 30c., pkt. 10c. 

RHUBARB 

OR u PIE PLANT.” 

CULTURE—To grow from seed, sow early in the spring In rows 15 to 
TO Inches apart, dropping two or three seeds U) the inch. Tho land should 
lie made very rich and kept free from weeds. Setout the roots the following 
spring in rows 4 feet apart and 2 feet apart in the rows. 

Rhubarb 8ceds, Victoria— Lb. $1.00, 34 lb. 50c., oz. 15c., pkt. 5e 

RHUBARB ROOTS, VICTORIA— Tbo best variety. Boots by mall, 
prepaid. 20c each, $1.80 per dozen. By express, not prepaid, 16c. each, 
gt 25 per dozen. Root* sent as soon as the weather permits. 

















16 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


RADISHES. 

Do not fall to sow a good bod of Radishes. They are appetising, 
attractive and healthy, and so easily grown that everyone can raise them 
without any trouble. 

CULTURE.—For very early use how in hot-bed in rows 2 to 3 inches 
apart, b or summer use sow in the open ground 12 to 15 inches apart, 
dropping one or two seeds to the inch. If sown in August they will be 
excellent for fall use. An ounce of seed will sow 100 feet of row. 





FELTON'S IMPROVED WHITE BOX RADISH. 


FELTON'S IMPROVED WHITE BOX RADISH. 

A magnified)!/, largo, rapid-growing white radish. Very handsome 
and attractive In appearance, solid and of best quality, It Is the hail white 
rail Ink for forcing or outdoor culture. It Is so largo and handsome that It 
brings the highest price In market. Lh.OOo.,% lb, 26c., o/., 12c., pkt. Cc. 

EARLIEST SCARLET WHITE TIPPED FORCING RADISH. 

'rids Is the carUcut 
Radish, Wo have 
grown Radishes of 
marketable sl/.o in is 
(UtyH from the tlmo of 
sowing tlio seed. The 
Radishes are bright 
rod with pure whlto 
tip, and very small 
tops, and arc beau lie*. 
Wo lmvoan extra lino 
strain of this seed. 
Tib. 00 c., y\b. 2l5o., oz. 

EARLIEST SCARLET WHITE TIPPED FORCING RADISH. 10c., pkt. Be. 

Earliest 8oarlot Forcing The same as above, except It 1ms not tho 
while tip, Heed the Muitio prlco. 

EARLY SCARLET GLOBE SHORT-TOP RADISH. 

A very early forcing radish of the jlnent quallt]/, bolng perfectly solid, 
crisp and of mild flavor. Will form handsome dark rod, globe-shaped 
radishes In 2(1 days from sowing tho Hood. One of the best for forcing and 
out-door culture. Lb. $1.00, lb,80o.,o/„ I2e„ pkt. Be. 

Prlco of tho following; Standard Varieties; 

Lb. 006;, U 4 lb. for., oz. Sc., pkt, fic. 

Wood’s Early Frame Tho best fmq; radish for forcing. 

Long Scarlet Short-Top -Grows 0 to 8 laches long; Is straight, smooth 
and bright scarlet, and of best quality. 

CH ARTIER Tho/Jmvd long radish. Larger around than above and not 
quite so long Smooth, straight, bright red with white tip; very hand¬ 
some and or line quality; remains for a long time without gelling 
stringy. 



Scarlet Turnip White Tip— A very attractive little radish. Very early. 
French Breakfast -Olive-shaped with white tip. Crisp and tender 
Rose, Olive-Shaped -Early handsome, and of the best quality. 

Round Red, or Scarlet Turnip— Early, dark red, crisp and tender. 
Round White Turnip— Same as above except in color. 

White Strasburg— The best long white radish for summer use Will 
remain crisp and tender even when very large. 

WINTER RADISHES. 

CULTURE—Sow in July or August in rows 15 to 
30 inches apart and thin to 3 inches apart in the rows. 

! Store for winter in sand in the cellar or in pits like 
turnips, They will keep fresh and crisp all winter 
and often bring very profitable prices in market. 

CHINESE ROSE— One of the very best varieties. 

Roots 5 inches long and 2 inches in diameter, 
bright rose color, flesh white, crisp and of mild, 
delicate flavor. Lb. 75c., y lb. 25c., oz. 10c., pkt.5c. 

California Mammoth White— Very large, pure 
white, root3 long, straight and smooth. Lb. 75c., 

% lb. 25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

Long Black Spanish— Along, smooth radish, nearly 
the same size 'at the bottom as the top, and of a 
d irk brown color, nearly black. Flesh white and 
solid. Popular in market. Lb. 60c., y lb. 18c., 
oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 

Black Spanish Turnip -Similar to above except in CHINESE ROSE, 
shape, which is short and round like a turnip. Lb. COe., % lb. 18c., 
oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 

SPINACH. 

CULTURE.—For summer use the seed should be sown as early as 
possible in the spiing in rows 15 inches apart, dropping two or three seeds 
to the incli of row. When up, thin the plants to three or four inches apart. 
The ground should be rich, and a dressing of two or three pounds of nitrate 
of soda per square rod will have a wonderful effect on the growth of the 
spinach. For early spring use the seed should be sown in September, and 
the plants given a slight covering of straw or leaves tefore winter sets in. 
Norfolk Savoy-Leav¬ 
ed— (also cal led 
“ Rloomsdale ”)— A 
very handsome va¬ 
riety, with curled or 
blistered leaves like 
a Savoy cabbage; 
quality the very 
best. Lb. 31c., y lb. 

15c., oz. 8c., pkt. 5c. 

Long-Standing— One 
of tho best varieties 
to sow in the eprlny, 
as It remains longer NORFOLK SAVOY-LEAVED, 

without going to seed than any other. Leaves large, thin, and of fine 
quality. Lb. 36c., y lb. 15c., oz., 8c , pkt. Sc. 

LARGE THICK LEAF VIROFLAY — Very Larue , thick leaves or 
unsurpassed quality. Very slow to go to seed, and on that account 
valuable for spring sowing. It is also perfectly hardy and can be sown 
In tho full to advantage, Lb. 35c., % lb. 15c., oz. 8c., pkt 5c 
Round, or Summer-Thick leaves of good quality. It is perfectly hardy 
and can bo sown in the fall. Lb. 30c., y lb. 15c.. oz 8c , pkt 5c/ 

Prickly, or Winter— Prickly seed; leaves smooth and very hardy. 
Lb. 30c., lb. 15e., oz. 8c., pkt. Be. 

NEW ZEALAND SPINACH. 

This Is not a true spinach, but a plant that can be used for the same 
purpose. Produces an abundance of leaves and stems a foot or more in 
length. Will grow during hot, dry weather when other spinach would be 
useless, continuing to furnish nice “ greens ” all summer. The leaves and 
Kleins are tender and of excellent flavor. Sow the seed in May in /ows 
30 inches apart. Lb. $1.00, y lb. 30c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 




oAivoLr Y , UK VHUh 1 ABLE OYSTER. 

Salsify Is as easily grown as parsnips, and is more delicate and fine 
flavored, much resembling oysters in this respect. It is used in the fall and 
winter and early spring when there are few other vegetables, and will be 
very welcome on every table. Do not think of omitting it from your garden 
OULTUHE.-Sow in the spring as soon as tho land is in good condition 
In rows twenty inches apart. The seed can be drilled hi S. ti.S S- 
l’ianet Jr. Drill. Thin the plants to three inches apart in the rows This 
should be done as soon as the plants come up, for If left till laterthev are 
very hard to pull. The land should be made rich with manure or fertS 
Izers. A deep,sandy loam Is best. UI1 1UU1 

^"^Ici^mcasurfriK fouMo 7lv7^nches > nrouud^an^ i(^)’ 

is ° r extra iarge “ ,,a 














JOSEPH HARRIS CO, MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


17 


s s ^ SQUASH. s 



CULTURE.-—Plant, when the ground is warm and danger of frost Is 
over, in hills 1 feet apart for the summer or hush varieties, and 8 feet for 
winter varieties. Light land is best, and it should be made very rich with 
well-rotted manure. We prefer manuring the whole land rather than 
putting the manure in the hills only. Thin the plants to threo or four in a 
hill after they get their second leaves. To keep oil’ the bugs, dust the 
plants as soon ns they come up with slacked lime or plaster Infused with 
turpentine. 


IMPROVED HUBBARD SQUASH. 

Pure Dark Green and Warty. 

There is no squash superior to a tlrsLclass Hubbard. Most Hubbards 
however, are of Inferior shape and color, being light green with more or 
less yellow lines. Our Improved strain, produced by constant and careful 
selection, produces squashes of uniform shape, dark green and warty. Such 
squashes aro of the best quality and bring the highest price in market, 
id). 75c., lb. 25c., O'/i. 10c„ pkt. 5c. 


NEW WHITE CROOKNECK SQUASH. 

A white Crookneck squash Is certainly a novelty. This new squash Is 
not only pure white but is very large and early and of the best quality. 
The fruit is much larger and handsomer than the old Yollow Crookneck. 
Oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 


Price of any of the following varieties: Lb, 70c., lb. 20c,, oz. 10c., 
pkt. 5c. 

Prolific, or Early Orange Marrow Squash The best fall squash. Emit 
deop orange color, will) thick yellow flesh of the finest quality. It Is 
earlier than the Boston Marrow and more prolific, and an Improvement 
on that excellent variety. It is the finest, squash for fall or early 
winter use 



NEW GIANT CROOKNECK SQUASH. 

This new strain of Crookneck squash Is twice an large as the old 
variety and of equally good quality, and a little earlier. Fruit bright 
yellow and verjl warty. Its large size, earliness and handsome appear¬ 
ance will make it entirely supersede the old variety for market. Lb. 75c., 


% lb., 25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 


SUMMER AND FALL VARIETIES. 

Price of the following varieties: Lb. 70c., % lb, 20c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 
Perfect Gem— A delicious little squash. Perfectly round and pure white. 

Cooks dry and is of fine flavor. Excellent for summer or early fall use. 
Boston Marrow— An excellent Fall squash, well known and popular in 
market. Fruit of good size, deep yellow and with thick flesh of the 
best quality. 

Early Bush Crookneck— The most popular early Summer squash 
Early Bush Scallop -Flat white squashes, scalloped around tb' edge. 


SIBLEY, or PIKE'S PEAK SQUASH — One of tho finest Winter 
squashes. Will keep all winter. Cooks dry, and Is of line nutty flavor. 
The fruit Ip of medium size, lighUgroon and smooth, with a hard, thin 
rind. 

Marblehead— Fruit light green, smooth and of medium size. Flesh tlilok, 
yellow, and cooks dry, and Is of tho finest quality. 

Essex Hybrid— A very sweet, fine-grained and high-flavored squash. 
Flesh very thick, deep yollow and firm. Will keep all winter. 



PROLIFIC OR EARLY ORANGE MARROV/ SQUASH. 























18 


HARRIS' RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


4 . 


4 TOMATOES. 






CULTURE.—Sow the seed in a box in the house or hot-bed in March or first of April, and transplant into other boxes or frames when the plants get 
two or three inches tall. Set out the plants when danger of frost is over, in good rich soil, in ro^vs 5 feet apart and 3 feet apart in the rows. A mixture of 
•equal parts of nitrate of soda and superphosphate applied at the rate of a handful to a plant, will produce a wonderful effect in thegrowth and product¬ 
iveness of the plant and size of its fruit. 

We make a specialty of growing the finest improved varieties of Tomatoes, and now, after selecting our seed stock 
from the largest, smoothest and most solid Tomatoes for years, we think we have the finest strains of some of the best 
varieties in existence. 


POTOMAC TOMATO.—From a Photograph. 
J. M. Long of East Wlnthrop, Me., 


in 

POTOMAC 

TOMATO. 

VERY SOLID, LARGE, 

SMOOTH AND PRODUCTIVE. 

The accompanying photograph 
gives some idea of theslzeand solid¬ 
ity of this magnificent tomato The 
seed was sent us some years ago by 
a friend on the Potomac Itiver and 
we have greatly Improved it since, 
until now we have a tomato of large 
size, remarhahly solid, and of quality 
that is unequalcil. ft Is also very 
productive and early, ripening near¬ 
ly the whole crop of fruit before frost 
In the Northern Elates. The toma¬ 
toes contain fewer seeds and have 
more solid flesh In them thun any 
other kind. For table use, canning 
and for market they are the finest 
tomato grown. Oz. fiOe., pkt. 10c. 

Potomac the Boat of All.—Mr. ... .... 
says: “ The Potomac Tomato was the best of all. I don't think It is’gener- 
ally appreciated as It should bo. We tried over 20 of the leading kinds to 
get one that was of first-class flavor, solid, smooth, and not too late for the 
Northern latitude. Potomac seems to be as solid and delicious as any, 
and In addition proved prolific, of good size and smooth enough for any¬ 
body. My wife will not eat any other kind now. I have found the tomato 
I was after." 

EARLY LEADER TOMATO. 

the EARLIEST TOMATO. 

Thin | l0 |/ n l,y f iWldor wl>1 r, P° n fruit earlier than any othor tomato. 
/. . wh <>lo story. The man who cun get his tomatoes Into market 

fl Ml, gets I,ho mostmoney. Like most of the early varieties tho first Is not 
as solid and flno flavored us Home of tho later sorLs, but since It gives ripe 

m,Tn^n.«^ O | WU ! ,l,H . P n r ! l0r ,,lmn olhor kl,ltlH 11 "'ll! pay every one to lmvo 
purl, of I,hell plunlH of thin variety, The Mill In of good hIsio, Hinool.li and a 
Komi color ami the vlmw aro verp prnlljls. l{ II,. 8i.no. oz. .fiio., pkt. ldc. 

DWARF CHAMPION TOMATO. 

VOry <? u, »!!ty. Tnko. but Uttlo Room, Ylold. Well- 

*, * * Tomnt °»» for Homo U.o and Market. 

IhaL I 1, 17, r‘ I 1 e 1 V 1 lll ' l0ty KI ' ow vt "‘y Kloulc y, with a Htitr upright atom 
il/n m I U ' l l ° K, '°" IUl Ulltl1 'l' 1110 The fruit Ik of good 

an! n uT,"" ,lpplo > of M * hl orln ™" color, m lUl nrnl of tho tot 
/«<!/ //. the planl.M grow ho compact that they can be planted closer 
together than other varieties, and in this way a very largo ylold can bo 
obtained off of a small piece ofland. Onr Htmln of tills varloty Is superior 

Lb. SIMM), % lb, 850., oz, 25o., pkt, lOo, 

EARLY RUBY. 

t 1 , | T | H * f ar , umt smooth tomato of large size. 

duces °' 10 "! tl '° fl , rtrtot v ' lrlotlos b » l our improved strain pro- 

» t i pprf ° oiiy mmt,i re < /,,i " r - ^ 

smn. When?' ox 1 tmwir 'y tomato, all of which arc cither Irregular or 
to su t us hut we h V l‘ r y "’“ N ,lrKt ' lnlrotluoo<1 11 was not regular enough 
and i Zlhes n nU r ib0 '' ° f yCure boo » "looting the earliest 

snrZ,r,n ft 1 fturt b,lvt ' now obtained a strain that Is 
on o Hot ,Z7r' SS ’, mn0 I , t |,,,l ' SN a ,, d l«W Mie. The quality of tho 
Uuhywirhonswhm 0 ' ,8 D ' vnrfChl ‘ ra Plon or Ignotum, but tho Early 
Itf n ^ T P , VtrU tar,V ' Und on this account is valuable 

HiTuKSS* - * » "r-. 



Bond's Early Minnesota 

This new early tomato grows to 
a medium size, is perfectly smooth, 
and of the finest quality , which can 
not be said of any other extra early 
variety with which we are acquaints 
ed. For those who do not care for 
very large size, but want nice, 
smooth tomatoes of the best quality 
and want them early, the Early 
Minnesota will be a pleasing acqui¬ 
sition . lb. $1.00, oz. 30c., pkt. 10c. 

IMPERIAL TOMATO. 

This new Tomato possesses so 
many excellent points that it has 
become very popular wherever 
grown. It is a remarkably large, 
smooth, handsome tomato, dark 
red and very firm and solid. The 
vines are very strong, robust grow¬ 
ers, and very productive. The fruit 
ripens early and is so even in size 
and handsome in appearance that 
it brings the highest price in mar¬ 
ket. X lb. $1.00, oz. 30c., pkt. 10 c 


IGNOTUM TOMATO. 

The fruit is uniformly very large and remarkably Arm and solid. The 
color is a rich scarlet and even all over the fruit without leaving any green 
around the stem. Our strain is so well bred that we can pick bushels upon 
bushels without an Irregular tomato among them. We strongly recom¬ 
mend this variety for market, canning and table use. Our seed is all our 
own growing from selected fruit. Lb. $3.00, y x lb. 85c , oz. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

PONDEROSA, or HENDERSON'S No. 400. 

A very large tomato sometimes weighing two pounds. It succeeds best 
on treilisos when tho frillt Is kept off the ground. The tomatoes are very 
solid and of tine quality, with very few seeds. It is, however, somewhat. 
Irregular In shapo and does not color well around the stem ; but by giving 
extra care, some remarkably fine specimens can be obtained. Oz. 6 Cc, 
pkt. 10 c. 

PRICE OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES: 

Lb. $2.50, 1-4 lb. 75c., oz. 25c., pkt. 5o. 

Livingston's Beauty—Avery fine tomato. The fruit is so smooth, regu¬ 
lar and even in size that they look rh though cast In a mold. It is a 
very heavy cropper, medium early, and a strong grower. Fine for 
market or canning. 

Optlmus —Early, smooth, bright scarlet and of best quality. 

Golden Queen—The best ycUnw tomato. Fruit as smooth as an apple and 
ot a beautiful color and fine quality. 

M,J lns!mi° r * qurte e earl 3 ” ybr,d_re/1/ * an/csolid frllit > somewhat irregular 

Livingston's Favorite-A very popular variety. Fruit deep red; large 
and smooth. A heavy cropper. * * 

Perfection—Very similar to above. Used largely for canning. 

Paragon—Largo, smooth, dark red. Very popular. 

Trophy, Acmo and General Grant-All well-known varieties. 

SMALL FRUITED TOMATOES. 

fruit resembles a peach so much in size, shape and 
J I * 10 ? 16 l \ r V deceived by it It has even the bloom or 

lu/./. or tho peach, which Is found on no other tomato. The fruit is of a 
p ,? l l U ft ,iv °r and is good eaten from the hand like a peach. 
U/.. 30c., pkt. 6 c. * 

^ed^^Cherry—Fruit very small. Used for pickles and preserves. Oz. 30c., 

Ye, |°* Plum-Plum-sImped, bright yellow. Fine for preserves. Oz. 35c., 

GROUND CHERRY, or HUSK TOMATO-Also called Strawberry 
*?T' ?: 0r ' UQ \ e J Cherry. yellow fruit that grows in a husk 

of \ery peculiar fla vor. Used principally foi; preserves. Oz 3uc„ 











JOSEPH HARRIS CO., MORETON FARM. N. Y. 19 


TURNIPS. 

CULTURE.—For early use, sow early In the spring in rows 15 inches j 
apart, and thin the plants to five or six inches apart in the rows. For fall 
or winter use, the best way is to sow in rows in June and July, but many 
prefer to sow broadcast and harrow or rake the seed in. For this purpose 
Purple Top Strap Leaf is the best variety. New mucky land is the best 
lor this mode of culture. In sowing broadcast use about one pound of 
seed per acre. In drills use two pounds per acre. 

PURPLETOP STRAP 

LEA F— The favorite 
variety for summer and 
autumn use. Turnips 
llat, clear white with 
purple top. We have 
a tine strain. Lb. 50c., 
34 lb. 18c., pkt. 5c. 

Early Purple-Top Mi¬ 
lan— This new variety 
much resembles t h e 
above, but is two weeks 
earlier , being the earliest 
variety in cultivation. The bulbs are clear white, smooth and hand¬ 
some, with purple top. Lb. 70c., % lb. 20c., pkt. 10c. 

White Flat Dutch— Very early, pure white, and of the best quality. 
Lb 50c., % lb. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Early Yellow Stone— An early Hat yellow turnip, of fine quality. Lb. 50c., 
lb. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Yellow Aberdeen— A large globe-shaped yellow turnip. Fine for use in 
the fall or early winter, or for stock feeding. A heavy cropper. Tib. 
50c., 14 lb. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

Golden Ball— A handsome early yellow turnip, as round as a ball, and of 
the best quality. lib. 00c., 34 lb. 20c., pkt . 6c. 



EARLY PURPLE-TOP MILAN. 


RUTA BAGAS, OR SWEDE TURNIPS. 

CULTURE.—How In Mayor June, in rows 2 to 234 foot apart, and thin 
I he plants to ten inches apart. The land should be well manured or 
fertilized. We tlnd a dressing of equal parts of nitrate of soda and 
superphosphate, applied brondcastat the rate of 100 or 500 pounds per acre, 
before the seed is sown, gives the best, results, often more than doubling 
the yield. Use about two pounds of seed per acre. 

NEW WHITE SHORT TOP RUTA BAGA. 

Tills new Swede turnip was sent to us by a grower in France. It 
proved to be a very handsome white ruta baga with remarkably short 
tops and no “ neck.” Turnips are light green on top and pure white on the 
bottom. Grows to a good size, and are of line quality. We strongly 
recommend this variety for home use and market where a white ruta baga 
Is desired. Lb. 90c.. 34 lb. 30c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 


HARRIS' 'WHITE PURPLE-TOP RUTA BAGA. 

In the spring of 1S92 one oi 
our customers in Oswego, N. Y., 
sent to us some very handsome 
White Purple-Top Ruta Bagas, 
saying that they were brought 
into market by a Scotch garden¬ 
er, and that they were preferred 
to all other ruta bagas in the 
market. They were such hand¬ 
some turnips that wo set them 
out and raised some seed from 
them. They are as round as a 
ball, with very short necks and 
tops; pure whito on the bottom 
with purple top, and are large, 
smooth and handsome, and of 
excellent quality. Lb. 00c. 34 lb. 

8Uo., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

BREAD STONE TURNIP. 

This is without exception 
tho best table turnip wo have 
ever eaten. When cooked it is 
almost as dry and sweet us a 
good squash, ltbclougs to the 
Ruta Baga or Swedo Turnip 
class, but Is smaller and earlier 
than ordinary ruta bagas. It 

can he sown at any time from the first of J illy to tho first of August. 11 Is 
in good edible condition In November, and will keep perfectly fresh and 
good nil winter. Lb. 80c., 34 lb. 25c., pkt. 5c. 

Imperial Purple Top— The most popular variety. Largo, handsome 
globe-shaped yellow turnip, with purple top. One of the best varieties 
for table use, market or stock feeding. Lb, ftOe , lb. 15c., pkt. fie. 
White Sweet, or French- Globe-shaped white turnip, with green top, and 
of oxeollent quality. Lb. fi()o., 34 lb. 15c., pkt. Be. 

TOBACCO. 

We can furnish first-class seed of the following varieties of tobacco that 
has boon grown with great care by one of flu* host growers In tho country. 
Connecticut Seed Lenf-The most popular variety. Lb. $2.25, }., !b.70o., 
oz. 25c., pkt. 5c. 

Sterling— Early, and valuable for the North. Color bright yellow, anil of 
the finest quality. Lb. $2.50, 34 lb. 75c., oz. 26c., pkt . 5c. 

Havana—The finest Cuban tobacco, so famous for cigars. Lb. $3 75, 34 Hi. 
$1.00, oz. 30c.. pkt. 10c. 



Hums' White Purple-Top Rutn Buga*. 


AROMATIC AND SWEET HERBS. 


BORAGE— Sow seed in the spring in the open ground. Oz. 15c., pkt. 5c. 
CARAWAY— Sow in Bpring or Call. Very easily grown. Lb. 75c., 34 lb. 
25c., oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

CORIANDER -The young green leaves are used for flavoring soups, i 
salads, etc. Sow in the spring in the open ground. Lb. 75c., J4 lb. 25c., 
oz. 10c., pkt. 5c. 

DILL— Used for flavoring cucumber pickles, etc. Lb. $1.00, 34 lb. 30c., 
oz 12c., pkt. 5c. 

ROSEMARY— A perennial, and will last for years when once started, j 
Sow in the spring in the open ground where the plants are to remain. 
Oz. 40c., pkt.5c 


SAGE— When once started will last for years. Should be In every garden. 
Sow in the open ground and thin the plants lo four or five inches apart. 
Lb. $2.00, 34 lb. 00c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

SUMMER 8AVORY— Easily grown by sowing seed In the open ground 
In the spring. Lb. $1.40,341b. 40c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 

SWEET MARJORAM -Very valuable forseasonlngdressing for poultry, 
Imparting a very agreeable and pleasant flavor. Easily grown from 
seed. Cultivate like sage. Lb. $1.75, 34 lb. 50c., oz. 20c., pkt. 5c. 
THYME— Start the seed In a box in the house or hot-bed, and set out the 
plants when the ground is warm. Oz. 30c., pkt. 10c. 


WHAT THEY SAY OF OUR SEEDS. 


Only One Fault. 

Mr. George Faulks, Hamilton Co., Ind., says: “ I find one objection to 
the seeds you send ine, the yilanls need too much thinning.” 

They all Grew. 

Mrs. Arthur Brown of Thurston, N. Y., writes us: “The seeds we 
bought of vou last year were Just splendid, nearly every one came up and 
grew. Although our garden was planted very late, everything did nicely. 

Good Seeds Better than Large Discounts. 

Mr. S N. Bailey of Dresden, Maine, writes: “ It pays to have good seeds 
and*I have aiwavs obtained them of you and shall continue to as long as I 
u*e seeds Many seedsmen. I see by their catalogues, of which I have 20 or 
mi re, make larger discounts than you, but do not stand behind their seeds 
as you do.” 


Promptness. 

Mr. Charles Bennett of Aldington, Mass., says: “Thanks for filling my 
order so promptly. The seeds and onion sets arrived all right and are 
very fine. 

33 to U 

Mr. H.C. Fuller of McKean Co.. I’u., write*: “The pound of DJlttog 
Seedling Potatoes I got of you produced 33 pounds of salable I otatois. 
The seeds I have bought of you have always proved good/ 


Never a Poor Seed. 


Mr. C. A. Winders of Belmont, 
If they are as good as in the past I 
poor seed from your bouse.” 


N. Y.. writes: “The seeds arrived O. K. 
shall be f-atlsfled, fori never received a 








20 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


WHOLESALE PRICE LIST FOR 1897. 

When seeds are ordered at the prices quoted in this list they will be sent by Express or Freight at the expense of the purchaser, 
but not by Mail. When the seeds ordered will weigh fifty pounds or more, it is usually cheaper to have them sent by freight than by 
express. Smaller packages than fifty pounds should be sent by express. 

MARKET GARDENERS who use a considerable quantity of seed will do well to send us their list for Special Quotations. 

DISCOUNT ON CLUB ORDERS.—It will pay to get up a club for our seeds and have them sent by Express or Freight. On such 
orders we will allow ten per cent, discount from prices quoted in this list, but the above discount does not apply to Peas, Beans or Corn 
ordered at bushel rates, nor Potatoes, Farm Seeds and Fertilizers. On these we can allow no discount. 

DISCOUNT ON LARGE ORDERS.—On any order for seeds, ordered at the prices quoted in this list, amounting to $10.00 or more 
v/e will allow a discount of ten per cent., with the same exceptions as above. 

Please Observe that v/e cannot send Seeds by Mail when ordered at these prices. 

All Seeds NOT on this Elat will be sent by Express or Freight at ten cents per pound less than the prices 
quoted in this Catalogue. 


A8PARACU8. 


Columbian Mammoth White 

Conover's Colossal.. 

Palm el to. 


BEET8. 

ECLIPSE. y . 

Egyptian Blood Turnip. 

Extra Early Bunsano.. 

Bnstaln’s Blood Turnip ... 

Marly Blood Turnip. 

LongHrnooth Blood Red. 


Harris* Yellow Clobo Mangel.. 

Giant Yellow Intermediate. 

Golden Tankard. 

Mammoth Long Rod, or Nor- 

blton Giant. 

Vllmorln’s Improved 8ugar Beet 

Imperial 8ugnr Boot. 

Lane's improved Sugar Beet. 

BEAN8 Dwarf or Bush. 

Pt. ill. 


lb. 

lb. om 

wt 

28 13 

25 

12 

40 

15 

55 

13 6 

55 

18 6 

45 

16 6 

45 

16 6 

45 

16 0 

45 

16 6 

>t for 8tock. 

30 

12 

30 

12 

35 

15 

30 

12 

10 

15 

30 

10 

35 

12 


MUSK MELON. 


Melrose. 

Now Cosmopolitan. 

New Early Hackensack.. 

Emerald Gem. 

Miller’s Cream. 

Champion Market. 

Netted Gem. 

Fine Green Nutmeg. 

White Japanese. 

Casaba. 

Montreal Market. 

Prolific Nutmeg. 

Hackensack . 


NEW VALENTINE WAX. 17 

Now HtrlnglcHH Green Podded... 1*0 

Cleveland's Imp. Valentino., 15 

Early Mohawk. ir» 

Black Wax. if, 

Black-Eyed Wax. |fl 

Golden Wax. If, 

Crystal Wax. 20 

Wardwoll's Kidney Wax. 15 

Refugee, <,r 1,1)00 to I. ir> 

Hondornon’s Bush Lima. 17 

Burpee's Bush Lima. 20 

BEANS Polo. 

Scotia. 28 

Golden Flageolet Wax. 25 

Speckled Oran berry. 23 

King of the Garden Lima. 18 

Larue Uma. 18 

Hearlot Runner. 25 

BEANS Field. 
Boston Small Pea. 


Pk. Bu. 


00 81.15 8-1 00 
<10 2.00 8.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.25 
1.15 
1.15 
I 00 
1 00 
1.00 
1.75 
2.00 


a. 75 

3.75 
■1.50 
4.00 
4.00 
0 00 
a. 75 

a. r>o 

0.50 
7.IK) 


2.00 


2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.20 


7.00 
7 00 
7.00 
8.(HI 


Marrow Pea. 

CORN Sweet. 

Oory. 

New White Oory. 

Country Gentiemnn. 

Shaker's Early. 

Hlokox Improved. 


Stowoll’n Evergreen. 

Gold Coin. 

Perry's Hybrid. 

Pnrohlng, or Pop Corn. 

OARROTS. 

MA8TODON. 

Ox-Honrt, or Quorande. 

Early French Short 1 Lorn. 

Harris’ Early Half Long. 

Long Orange. 

Largo White Belgian. 

CUCUMBERS. 

Now Siberian. 

Japanese Gllmblng. 

Oool and Crisp. 

Now Everbearing. 

Now Giant White. 

Paris Plokllng. 

Tallby’H Hybrid. 

Nlohol'e Medium Green. 


Early Green (Muster. 


15 25 

DO 

3.00 

in 25 

80 

2.75 

15 25 

80 

2.50 

12 20 

80 

2.75 

15 25 

85 

3.H0 

15 25 

60 

3.25 

12 20 

80 

2.50 

12 20 

81) 

2.75 

12 20 

60 

3.00 

12 20 

80 

3.00 

12 2(1 

70 

2.25 

li 20 

IK) 

3.00 

12 20 

H() 

2.75 

15 25 

1.25 

•1 00 

lb. 

',1b 

«/.. 

$ 65 

«>.* 

8 

75 

«»■» 

H 

85 

25 

8 

70 

21) 

8 

65 

20 

8 

50 

15 

6 

(15 

0.1 

13 

1.10 

45 

18 

60 

28 

13 

75 

25 

8 


70 

23 

1 65 

15 

18 

4 > 

17 

8 

15 

17 

8 

45 

17 

8 

15 

17 

8 

45 

17 

8 

45 

17 

8 

45 

17 

8 

45 

17 

8 


WATER MELON 
Fordhook Early. 

MoilnLain Kweet. 

Kolb’s Gem. 

Ice Oream, true white seeded. 

Cuban Queen. 

Mammoth Iron (Mad. 

Volga. 

Hungarian Honey. 

Citron— Green, for preserves. 

MUSHROOM SPAV 


ONIONS. 

Early Southport Red Globe... 


Yellow Globe Danvors, extra 

selected. 

Yellow Globe Danvers, California 

need. 

Round Yollow Danvors. . 

8outhport White Globe. 

Marly I.urge Red.. 


Harris’ Red Globe. 

Now Early Barlotta.. 


Prlzo Taker . 

For five pounds or upwards 
write for Hpcclal prices. 

ONION SETS. 


lb 

‘41b. 

oz. 

$1.40 

•10 

18 

45 

18 

1.40 

33 

18 

60 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

70 

20 

8 

1 10 

30 

13 

60 

20 

8 

00 

20 

8 

M) 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

00 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

1.15 

.‘10 

13 

55 

18 

8 

55 

18 

8 

55 

18 

8 

55 

18 

8 

55 

18 

8 

60 

20 

8 

85 

25 

8 

75 

/N. 

•M> 

8 

20 



1.30 

38 

13 

1.10 

31 

13 

1.10 

38 

13 

75 

25 

8 

IK) 

28 

10 

2.40 

72 

23 

1 10 

:w 

13 

2.40 

72 

23 

1.1H) 

58 

18 

1.85 

55 

18 

1.65 

•18 

18 

1 DO 

58 

18 


PARSNIP. 


Long Hollow Crown...., 

Guernsey Half Long.. 


RADISH. 

Earliest Scarlet White-Tipped 

Forcing. 

Earliest Scarlet Forcing. 

Felton’s Improved White Box.. 

Chartier. 

Early Scarlet Globe Short Top 

New French Breakfast. 

Long Scarlet Short Top. 

White Strasburg. 

Other varieties, including Win¬ 
ter Radishes, deduct 10c. per 
pound from price on page 10. 

SALSIFY, or VEGETABLE OYSTER. 

New Mammoth Sandwich 


lb. 

Klb. 

oz. 

35 

13 

6 

40 

15 

6 

75 

20 

8 

75 

20 

8 

80 

32 

10 

50 

17 

6 

85 

25 

10 

50 

17 

6 

60 

17 

6 

50 

17 

6 


SPINACH. 

Long Standing. 

Prickley, or Winter. 

Round, or Summer. 

Vlroflay.. 

Norfolk Savoy Leaf (Bloomsdale) 
New Zealand. 

SQUASH-Summe 


New White Crookneck.. 
Giant Crookneck. 

Early Bush Crookneck. 

Early Bush Scallop. 


SQUASH-WInter. 


Yellow. 

White Sllvorskln. 

Potato Onion Sots. 

Egyptian, or Poronnial Tree. 

Write for prices per bushel. 

PEAS. 

Alaska. 

First and Bost, or First of All 

Nott's Excelsior. 

Blue Poter. 

Horsford's Market Gardon. 

JUNO. 

Bliss’ Abundance. 

Yorkshire Hero. 

'Pall Sugar fcdlblo pods). 


qt. pk. 
20 $ 80 
25 1.00 
20 1.75 
20 85 


Pike’s Peak, or Sibley. 

Hubbard, very tine strain.. 

Marblehead. 

Perfect Gem. 

Boston Marrow. 

Essex Hybrid. 

Prolific Marrow. 


$ 1.35 

38 

13 

. 20 

10 

G 

. 20 

10 

G 

20 

10 

0 

20 

10 

G 

1 20 

10 

G 

85 

25 

8 



?/* 

65 

22 

8 

60 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

GO 

20 

8 

65 

20 

8 

GO 

20 

8 

60 

20 

8 

GO 

10 

8 

GO 

20 

8 

Gj 

20 

8 


pt. qt. pk. bu. 
15 25 SI.00 83.75 
" 20 00 
1.50 
1.20 
1.20 


35 

25 


3.25 

5.00 

4.00 

• 1.00 


Heroine. 

Amoricnn Wontlor, true. 


Stratagem. 

White Marrowfat... 


Blaek-Eyed Marrowfat. 

CANADA FIELD PEAS.. 


PUMPKINS. 


Large Cheese . 


Mammoth Potlron 


15 

25 

J . ilU 

1.15 

4.00 

15 

25 

1.20 

4.00 

18 

35 

1.85 

7 no 

15 

25 

1.10 

3 75 

15 

25 

1.25 

4.00 

15 

25 

1.50 

5.00 

18 

30 

1.50 

5 00 

12 

20 

00 

8.00 

15 

25 

1.25 

1.50 

17 

30 

1 GO 

5.75 

10 

15 

70 

2. CO 

12 

20 

75 

2.25 

10 

15 

70 

2.00 

S 

13 

40 

1.35 


lb. 

'4 lb 

07.. 

00 

2s 

8 


35 

12 

G 


20 

10 

6 

0 

.35 

60 

18 


TURNIP. 


Early White Flat Dutch. 40 

Marly Yellow Stone. 

Yellow Abordeen. 

Purple Top 8trap Loaf.. 

Extra Early Milan . 


lb. lb. 


40 
40 
50 

_ .. 60 

Golden Ball, or Orange Jelly. 60 

RUTA BACA. 

New White Short Top. 

Harris’ White Purple Top. 

Bread Stone. 

White Sweet., or French.. 

Imperial Purple Top.:. 


80 

80 

65 

40 

40 


13 
13 
13 
15 
J 18 
15 


28 

28 

20 

12 

12 


100 

15 

25 


500 

70 

1.20 


WOODEN POT PECS. 

25 

434 Indies long, painted. 5 

By mail, postpaid. 8 

CARDEN LINE. 

‘ . , TT fOft. 120 ft. 180 ft. 

Best American Hemp. 25 45 70 

By mail, prepaid. 35 65 05 

WHITE HELLEBORE POWDER. 

By express. l lb. 32c. 3 lbs POc. 10 lbs $2 75 

By mail, prepd.J4 lb. 20 e. I lb. 50c. 3 lbs. 145 

PYRETHRUM POWDER. 


By express .. 

By mall. 


V A lb. 1 lb. 3 lbs. 
50 51 40 
20 70 2.00 













































































































































































21 


_JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM. N. Y. 

d> POTATOES. dt d> 

Northern Grown Seed. No Blig-ht or Other Diseases. 



CARMAN No. 1. WASHINGTON. GREAT DIVIDE. 

THREE GRAND MAIN CROP POTATOES.—For description see next page. 

It does not pay to plant poor mixed seed potatoes, grown on blight-infested fields. Such seed never can give 
the best results, no matter how favorable the circumstances. 

It pays to plant good seed of the best varieties, even if such seed costs four times as much. We speak 
from our own experience. We have often seen a difference in yield of 100 to 150 bushels per acre between some of 
the best new varieties and the varieties commonly grown. The seed of the new varieties costs, perhaps, $4.00 per acre 
more than the other, and the value of the crop was $35 to §50 per acre more. The older varieties yielded well once, but 
had become infested with the germ of the blight and lost their vigor. 

Why not raise 3 °° bushels per acre instead of the usual 150 bushels? It can be just as easily done if the 
best varieties are used. They will cost but little more. 

Our Seed Potatoes are stored in dark, cool cellars and in pits, and keep without shrinking or sprouting, so that 
when planted they have all their vigor unimpaired. 

Prices. —At the prices quoted we pack and deliver the potatoes to freight depot in Rochester, and make no 
charge for boxes or barrels, but we do not pay freight charges. Our barrels hold three bushels each. 


EARLY 

HARVEST* 

The 

Best 

Early 

White 

Potato 



early harvest. 


EARLY MAY. 


' llfl-<b 




EARLY 

MAY. 

The Earliest* 
Yield 

250 Bushels 
per 
Acre. 


EARLY HARVEST. 

The Earliest , Largest and Handsomest White Potato. 

The Early Harvest has proved to be not only very early but of remark¬ 
able vigor and capable of yielding extremely large crops. The potatoes 
are pure white, with numerous eyes, and grow to a very lanje size for an 
early variety. We think this variety will produce more and better potatoes 
than any other early white potato, and, with the possible exception of the 
“ Early May.” than any early potato of any color. We offer these potatoes 
at a price that leave no excuse for planting ordinary seed of Inferior 
varieties. Pk. 40c.. bu. $1.00, bbl. $2,50. 


The Earliest Potato-" EARLY MAY." 

This new early potato was a surprise to us. It was planted later than 
any other variety on the farm but got ripe lendayb earlier than the other 
varieties hitherto considered the earliest potatoes. But what is more 
remarkable, it yielded over 250 InusheU per acre, while many other varieties 
blighted and proved nearly a failure. 

The potatoes are light rose color, smooth, with shallow eyes and very 
handsome, and are of very uniform size and shape. (See Cut.) The 
vines are vigorous and healthy. The quality of the potato Is of the 
last. This will prove a very profitable market variety, being two weeks 
earlier than Earfy Rose, Hebron and other early varieties. Don’t fall to 
plant it. % pk. 50c, pk. 75c., bu. $2.00, bbl. $5.00. 













22 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 



A. Ora nr I New White Potato, 


WASHINGTON. 


First in Yield, First in Profit, and First in the Esti¬ 
mation of Every Grower. 

Them are ho many new varieties* of potatoes offered every 
year—many of which are no better than many well-known 
varieties—that we are always very particular, before offering 
a new variety, to thoroughly test It, and If It does not possess 
any superiority over older varieties we discard It. But when 
we discovered this potato—which we have called "Wash¬ 
ington "—and saw what it was. we decided, without a 
moment's hesitation, that It was ahead of anything now 
grown. It Is a handsome, smooth, white potato, of the best 
shape, as shown In the photograph, page 21, grows unifr/rmly 
to a good marketable size, and is not affected by blight or 
scab, and yields more than any other variety we have 
grown. What more could be desired for a profitable mar¬ 
ket, potato ? The potatoes are so smooth and handsome that 
they will score “extra fancy,”and sell for the highest prices. 
The quality of the potato Is good, but not quite up to some of 
the smaller-yielding varieties, nevertheless it Is much supe¬ 
rior to many of the varieties now largely grown. 

We advise everyone to get a start with the seed of this 
potato this year. We offer It at a reasonable price, consider¬ 
ing Its great value and the small amount of seed wo have. 
The Washington Is not for sale by any other dealer this year. 

Price -By mall: IAj. 46c , 3 lbs. $1.00. By freight or ex¬ 
press: x / t pk. 76o., pk. $1.25, bu. $3.50, bbl. $0.00. 


STANDARD EARLY VARIETIES. 

New Queen— This is one of the best early varieties, and suc¬ 
ceeds on nearly all soils. The potatoes are light pink, 
oval to long In shape, grow to a large size and yields heavy crops. 
Much earlier than Karly Rose. We recommend this as one of the best 
early potatoes for homo uho or market. Pk. 40c , bu. .$1.00, bbl, $2.50. 
Chicago Market—A vary early light-red potato. (Irows uniformly large 
smooth and handsome, and yields remarkably well. One of the best 
early varieties. Pk. 45c , bu. $1.25, bbl. $2 00, 

Early Rose We have some pure and gonulno sood of this old favorite. It 
seems as vigorous as over. Pit 40c., bu. $1.00, bbl. $2.50. 

Rochester Rose This Isa larger and betteryloldor than the Karly Rose 
and Is of equally good quality. It is a llrsf-olnss second early potato for 
market or home use. Will yield ns much as most late varieties. 
Quality the best. Pk. 40c., bn. $1.00, bbl. $2.50. 

MEDIUM AND LATE VARIETIES. 

CARMAN NO. I. ( StY Il/ustration .) 

This potato lias been bilked about so much during the past two years, 
and Its merits have become so well known, that If seems hardly necessary 
to describe If. If seems to have earned universal praise. If Is a medium 
early potato, oval to round In shape, smooth and white, with very few 
arid shallow eyes, The vines aro remarkably vigorous, growing stocky and 
spreading, and resist blight wonderfully well. The potatoes grow close to¬ 
gether In the hill and are oven In size; on good land practically all aro 
marketable. The quality Is .first class. Yielded with us Ibis year 200 bushels 
per aero; many report much larger yields. We think If Is the best medium 
or second early potato. Our seed Is very line. Pk. 40c., bu. $1.00, bbl. $2.50. 

CARMAN NO. 3. 

This Is similar lo Carman No. 1 and to the Rural Now Yorkor No. 2 , 
but Is later than the No. 1 and of bottor quality than the Rum I Now Yorkor 
and sola more potatoes In the hill. The potatoes are smooth and hand¬ 
some and with few eyes. If seems to be superior to the Rural Now Yorkor 
In every way, and will undoubtedly supersede that popular variety. Pk. 
45o„ bu. $1,25, bbl. &:i.(H). 

GREEN MOUNTAIN. 

Of the Jlncst (/unlUy; yield# well-; tho best for home use. All who want a 
really lino potato, that wilt cook dry and mealy, should plant tho tlreen 
Mountain. Tholr quality Is superb. The potatoes aro oblong, white, oyes 
few and shallow, and skin slightly netted, which always denotes good 
quality In a potato, Tho seed should be out lo two eyes and planted on 
light land. If the land Is rich they will yield big crops of extra line 
potatoes, Pk. 40o„ bu. 51.00, bbl. $2.50. 

GREAT DIVIDE. 

This potato lms been largely advertised and great claims made for It. 
In out tests R has certainly proved itself to be among the Aral In yield and 
quality. The potatoes aro long, white with numerous shallow eyes and 
smooth skin. The quality Is excellent—the best of the large-yielding kinds 
Pk. 40c., bu. $1.00, bbl. $2,60. 


DUTTON'S SEEDLING. 

We have grown this variety for three years, and consider it one of the 
I best and most profitable potatoes to raise for market. It gave us an aver¬ 
age ol 305 Bushels of marketable potatoes per acre this year, and has done 
nearly as well every year since it was Introduced. The potatoes are long, 
white and smooth, and grow uniformly large, so that, practically, the whole 
crop Is marketable. The vines ure stout and vigorous and are free from 
blight, and the potatoes aro perfectly free from scab. This potato will 
prove profitable lo all who plant It. Don’t plant inferior varieties when 
, you can gel tlu* Dutton’s at the price we oiler them. Pk. 40c., bu. SI 00 
I bbl. $2.26. 

I . Mr. A. N Wallace, of Wyoming Co., N. Y., writes us: u The bushel of 
o- l J !° II / Inypotatnes I had of you last year I nlanted on l-li part of an 
r \ V<> C,,CH ', 1 ,ir llicld W(td ,:s bushel*, or /, IS bushels per acre, 

ones hi flic ht ^YhT^!,°i r / a i Ut Jn an , u T,l / re not a hushci of small 

pleased %)Uhcm" ddlhout manure of any kind. I am eery much 

MONEY MAKER— This Isa long, white, late potato, absolutely blight proof , 
as far as we can see. We saw one potato field in which the vines were 
completely blighted, except a few rows of Money Maker, which were as 
green and thrifty as could be desired. The vines are remarkably strong, 
they can bo distinguished In any field by their wonderful growth and 
vigor. The potatoes are uniformly large, straight and handsome and 
of superior quality. We strongly recommend this potato for sections 
whore blight is troublesome. This variety should be planted two weeks 
earlier than most other kinds ns It requires longer to mature Pk 40r 
bu. $1.00, bbl. $2.60. ’ ’ ’* 

SENECA BEAUTY— This Is the finest and handsomest red potato that we 
have over grown. The color Is bright and attractive, very different 
from tho ordinary dull-red potatoes. It yields immensely, and the 
quality is superb. Where a red potato Is desirable we strongly recom¬ 
mend the Seneca Beauty. It never blights or is affected by scab. 
Pk. 40c., bu. $1.00, bbl. $2.50. 

Rural Now Yorker-Thls has become a very popular variety, and hardly 
needsu description. We cau furnish flrstrdassstock. Pk. 40c., bu. $1.00 
bbl, $2.25. 

Irish Dnlsy-A much advertised and greatly-praised variety, Introduced 

by a Philadelphia seedsman, who claimed It was better in every way 
t ban any other potato on earth. We have grown it for two years and fail 
to discover where the superiority comes In. It is a round, white potato 
with deep eyes. Its principal characteristic is a tendency to produce 
great numbers of potatoes in a hill. We have dug hills that contained 
twenty and some even thirty potatoes, all as large or larger than a 
lien s egg. When given the best of land enormous crops should be 
possible. The quality of the potato is poor. We offer our seed at the 
following low prices: Pk. 35c., bu. 90c., bbl. $1.75. 

WRITE TO U8 FOR PRICES.—Whew" It I. doired to purchase potato*, in 

PMOF8in P S!r qU r^ !I 5b * rr ' U ° rmorc) p,c “‘ c wr,t * for SPECIAL 
1 HlChH on the vnrlctlc* deotred. 
















JOSEPH HARRIS CO., MORETON FARM. N. Y. 


23 


S FARM AND FIELD SEEDS. ^ 


Pays to Plant the Bost Varieties. I ho cost- is but slightly more* than for common mixed seed, and the 
lesults are always very much better. Take Corn, for instance. The difference in cost of seed between a good variety 
and common corn is not more than fifty cents an acre, yet we have often seen a difference in yield of twenty to twenty- 
five bushels of shelled corn per acre, in favor of the improved seed. 

We make a specialty of raising fine seeds of the best varieties of Corn, Oats, Bariev, etc., and sell them at low 
prices. We make no charge for bags, and deliver the seeds at express or freight depot, in Rochester withoutextra charge. 



Mammoih Yellov/ Flint Corn. 
Ears It Inches I.oiu.j. 




MAMMOTH EIGHT ROWED YELLOW 
FLINT CORN. 

What wo want in a corn for the north custom states is 
curliness combined with productiveness and vigor. This Is 
what wo have been aiming for in breeding up tills corn. It 
is not a new variety, but a well-bred strain of eight rowed 
yellow corn. In selecting and “ breeding” this corn wo have 
not only considered the size of the cars, but what is equally 
or more important tho 7ia/dt and productiveness of the stalk. 
Wo want the stalk to bo strong, with broad leaves and two or 
more good ears of corn. Tho usual practice of selecting tho 
best ears no matter from what kind of a stalk is not the way 
to obtain a first class corn. 

Our mammoth eight rowed corn shows the result of care¬ 
ful and scientific selection. The stalks grow very strong, not 
too tall.andeach produce two or more oars which aro long,sound 
and well filled out to the tip. This is, of course, on good land 
where the corn is not planted too thick. No corn can pro¬ 
duce perfect ears when crowded. Throe stalks in a hill Is all 
that should be allowed to grow, or if in drills tho stalks 
should bo afoot apart and tho rows 8 to 8% foot apart. This 
corn will mature ready to cut in IK) days from tho data of 
planting. Our crop in 1805 was in one Held of 5 acres, 000 
bushels of sound ears or ISO bushels per acre . At t his writing 
we cannot give the exact yield of this year’s crop, but it is a 
large one. Don’t think of planting ordinary corn whon you 
can got this Improved strain at tho following prices: Peck 
50c., bushel $1.60, 2 bushels $2.60. Kars, bushel $1.00, barrel 
(3 bu.) $2.76. By mall, postpaid, lb. 30c., 3 lbs. 76c. 

WHITE CAP YELLOW DENT CORN. 

This new early Dent Corn can be grown In tho northern 
states ns well ns Flint Corn. It is the earliest Dent Corn with 
good largo ears. Many who have wished to raise Dent Corn 
on account of its prollllcncss but have been deterred from 
doing so by the lateness of the older varieties will welcome 
this new early variety, which possesses the proliflcness of the 
Dent varieties and the earliness of tho Flint. Tho stalks 
grow 6 to 8 feet high and make first class fodder. Pk. 65c., 
bu. $1.76, 2 bu. $3.00. 


WHITECAP YELLOW DENT. 



EARLY GOLDEN PROLIFIC OATS. 

There is no grain of which there are so many so-called new varieties 
cons.antly being introduced as Oats, yet few of these varieties show any 
improvement over kinds in common use. But we think the Golden Pro¬ 
lific Is distinctand valuable. The headsare long and branching, the grain 
large and plump and the straw strong and st I IT. The Golden Prolific has 
yielded more for the last two years than any of the varieties grown on the 
farm, and we have tried all the most promising. The grain Is more yellow 
tLan some varieties./ui*' a r crp thin husk and weighs nearly 40 pounds to the 
measured bushel. There are a numberof varieties of oats that are heavier, 
among them White Plume (Killed by one seedsman “ Mortgage Lifter.”) 
Swedish Oats, Clydesdale, but then all have such thick hard husks that 
horses cannot masticate or digest them. The extra weight is almost en¬ 
tirely in the husk. Peck 40c.. bushel 31.00, bag, 2% bushels, $2.25,10 bushels 
or more at 80c. per bushel of 32 pounds. 

IMPROVED AMERICAN OATS. 

We have grown this variety for a numberof years, and still think it 
the best white oats in cultivation. With its plump, heavy grain, stiflTstraw 
and remarkable vigor and proliflcness, it is hard fo equal. Wo can furnish 
ehoice, heavy seed as follows: Peck 35c., bushel 90c. f 2% bushels $2.00, 
10 bushels or more at 75c. per bushel. 


BAXTER'S PROLIFIC BARLEY. 

This is an improved early six rowed Barley, that wo have found much 
superior to tho six rowed Barley commonly grown. The heads aro long 
and the grain plump and heavy. Tho straw Is stiff and holds up well even 
under a heavy crop and wot weather. From our trials we think it will 
yield at least one-third more than any other variety. Peck 40c., bushel $1.00, 
bag, W/t bushels, $2.30,10 bushels or more at 86c. per bushel 

DWARF ESSEX RAPE. 

For fall pasturage for sheep we have found nothing equal to Dwarf 
Essex Rape. Kown in July it makes an excellent growth by September I, 
when pastures are becoming short, and will furnish most excellent forage 
for sheep or cows all through the fall. Wc were much pleased with the 
results obtained with it the past season. Sow broadenstattherateofabout 
6 pounds per acre. Land adjoining a pasture Is best, so that the sheep can 
feed on both at the same time. Lb. postpaid 26c., by express or freight 16c. 
per lb., 10 lbs. or more 12c per lb. 

CANADA FIELD PEAS. 

These are the best Peas to sow with oats for fodder, which makes excel¬ 
lent food for cattle, sheep and hogs. Peck 60c., bushel $1.35, 2 bushels $2 40. 
Please write for prices on larger quantities. 


































24 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1S97. 


GRASS AND CLOVER SEED. 


We can furnish re-cloaned Grass and Clover seeds that are pure and 
free from weed seeds at the following prices. If any seeds are wanted bu 
mail please add 8 cent* per pm/.nd for j>ostage ; 

Ked Top. 14 lbs, per bushel.$ jr, 

“ extra re-clrjincfJ ,32 lbs. per bushel. One 
bushel is eoual to 2!^ bushels of ordinary seed 

Kentucky Bfue Grass, extra clean.. 

Orchard Grass.. 

Whip; Clover. 

Alfalfa or Lucerne... 

Hungarian Grass. 

English Perennial RyeGra 

I Lallan Rye Grass.. 

Meadow Fescue. 

.Sweet Scented Vernal Grass (true perennial;. 

Meadow Foxtail... 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass. 

German or Golden Millet. Write for price. 

Alalko Clover. Write for price per bushel. 18 

Red Clover, medium, extra re-cleaned. Write for 
price per bushel. 

Red Clover, mammoth, extra re-cleaned. Write 
for price. 

Timothy, extra re-cleaned. Write for price. 


Lb. 

Pk. 

bu. 

e 

3 45 

$ 1 35 

.. 25 

1 60 

5 50 

. 20 

60 

2 00 

. 20 

70 

2 20 

.. 35 

3 75 

14 00 

.. 25 

3 00 

JO 00 

.. 10 

50 

1 50 

.. 15 

50 

1 75 


55 

2 00 


I 00 

3 50 

.. 75 




1 00 

3 (X) 

25 

75 

2 75 

. 18 




HARRIS' GRASvS SEED MIXTURE. 

For Hay or Permanent Pasture. 

For hay and permanent pasture combined, Harris’Grass Mixture will 
be found unsurpassed. It consists of Orchard Grass, Red, Alsllco and 
White Clover, English and Italian Rye Grass, Meadow Fescue, Meadow 
Foxtail, Tall Meadow Oaf Grass, True Perennial Sweet Scented Vernal 
Grass, Kentucky blue Grass, Timothy and Red Top. This mixture can be 
sown In the spring or autumn, with or without grain. If sown alone, sow 
four bushels per acre; If with grain, three bushels per acre. 

Harris’ Grans and Clover 8ood Mixture By mall 36c. per lb., 3 lbs. $1.00. 

By freight or express, pic. 85c., bu. (20 lbs.) $3.00; no charge for bags. 


HARRIS' LAWN GRASS SEED. 

Composed of Extra Re-cleaned Seed of the Finest Grasses for Lawns. 

To obtain a thick, even, rich, dark-green lawn, there is nothing more 
important than good need. Most of the lawn grass seed sold is composed of 
ordinary cheap grass seed, not half cleaned and full of weed seeds that fill 
the lawn with foul weeds and spoil its beauty. Such seed is full of chalt 
and much lighter than clear seed. 

Harris’ Lawn Crass Seed is a mixture of the finest grasses, such as 
produce thick, velvety lawns, and only the cleanest and heaviest seed is 
used, thus insuring purity and strong vitality. The seed weighs 21, lbs. jwr 
bushel, while ordinary lawn grass seed weighs only 14 lbs. per bushel, thus 
a bushel of our seed is equal to nearly two bushels of ordinary seed. In 
comparing prices, this fact should not he overlooked. 

Price of Harris’ Lawn Grass Seed — by mail, postpaid, per lb. 
(\'4 quarts), 45c.; 3 lbs. or more at 40c. per lb. By express or freight, not 
prepaid, per peck (6 lbs.), $1.10; per bushel (24 lbs.), $4.00. 

HOW TO MAKE A LAWN. 

The land should be plowed or spaded as early in the spring as possible, 
and thoroughly raked over, so that it is perfectly level on the surface. If 
the land is hard or very poor it is well to spread a layer of muck or rich 
earth over the surface an inch or two deep, and also to apply a dressing of 
manure or fertilizer composed of equal parts of nitrate of soda and super¬ 
phosphate or hone meal, using 10 to 15 pounds per square rod. This should 
he raked into the soil and the seed sown broadcast as evenly as possible at 
the rate of one pound (1% quarts) per square rod. or five bushels per acre 
The seed should also he raked in. On old lawns that need re-invigorating, 
sow a half pound of seed to the square rod, and the same quantity of 
fertilizer as recommended above. 

FERTILIZERS FOR LAWNS. 

See Page 40. 


of VEGETABLE PLANTS. 4 

CABBAGE PLANTS, CAULIFLOWER PLANTS and CELERY PLANTS, Grown in Enormous Quantities. 

TOMA TO PLANTS in any Quantity, by Mail or Express* 


We grow great quantities of late Cabbage, Cauliflower and Colory 
Thu Cabbage and Catilblower blunts will ho ready to ship about Juno 1st, 
In the best condition. Celery blunts ready the last of June. 

Orders hooked at any Him* mid plants sont when wanted. We make 
condition. When In need of Plants please write us for prices 

CABBAGE PLANTS, 

Ready June 1st to August 1st. 

All the leading varieties, Including the Danish Cabbages, Solid Em¬ 
peror and Hollander. 

Iln Mull, Postpaid, 


95 plant* . ... 
I(M) plants .... 
200 plant*. 


I hi Express, not Prepaid. 

S .15 500 plants ... .'.. $1.25 

.15 1000 plants. 1 73 

.75 6000 plants or more per 1000.... 1.25 

CAULIFLOWER PLANTS, 

Ready June 1st to August 1st. 

Erfurt Hurl lent Dwarf uml Snowball the best varieties for oither early 
or Into erops. 


Plants, and can furnish them in any quantity desired, at very low prices, 
and from thou until August 1st, wo aim to have a constant supply of plants 

no charge for packing and guarantee the safe delivery of the plants in good 
on the quantity r desired. 

CELERY PLANTS, 

Ready last of June. 

Elrst. class, large stocky plants, grown in enormous quantities. Please 
write us for prices on quantities and varieties required. We can furnish 
huger and better plants than ills possible for the average grower to raise 
Wo glow all the varloties named in this Catalogue. 


Illl Mall, Postpaid. 

25 plants.$ ,25 

100 plants....so 

200 plants. I 50 


PEPPER PLANTS, 

7 t 

Ready May 15th. 

bell or Bull Nose, Golden Dawn, Cayenne* dozen, postpaid ..... ... ,35 


Illl Express, not Prepaid. 

100 plants,..$ 00 

500 plants. » 00 

1000 plants . 3.50 


Hu Mail , Postpaid. 
100 plants 
200 plants. 


.$ .50 
.. .85 


Hu Express, not Prepaid. 

500 plants.$1.25 

1000 plants .2.00 

5000 plants or more per 1000_ 1.50 

TOMATO PLANTS, 

Ready May J5th. 

We can furnish good, strong transplanted plants of the following varie¬ 
ties: Early Ruby, Early Leader, Dwarf Champion, Potomac, Imperial and 
Ignotum. Our plants are very much superior to those ordinarily sold. 


Hu Mail, Postpaid. 

1 dozen plants..$ .30 

2 dozen plants.50 


Du Express , not Prepaid. 

50 plants. .. $ 75 

100 plants.. 100 

1000 plants..8 00 














































JOSEPH HARRIS CO., MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


25 




FLOWER SEEDS. 







The Finest Flower Seeds at Less than Half Price. See what we Offer in Collections, page 34. 





ASTERS. 


The new and improved varieties of Asters are among our most beautiful and sat isfactory flowers, and will 
be a source of pleasure to all who raise them. 0 

the S M Cd in S l l° °P 1 on eround in M , ay ’ ln rows 15 hiches apart, and thin the plants to a foot 
ground 1 ° ° ’ the seed in a box and transplant the plants when a few Inches high Into the open 

NEW JAPANESE ASTER. 

1 ills new Aster is distinct from all other varieties, the flowers, as shown in our cut, have long narrow, and 
gracefully curved petals, and are of 'immense size and of a beautiful yhnde of pink. They are among the hand¬ 
somest Asters we have ever grown. Everyone should see these Asters to appreciate their beautv Piet 15 a 
2 pkts. 25c. 

NEW WHITE BRANCHING ASTERS. 

These now Asters grow on long stems that branch out from t he plant, which produce a very 
graceful effect and removes the sllflYiOfcS which Is the common fault of Asters. The flowers have 
narrow petals whloh are also very graceful In appearance. The plants are very floriferous. often 
being covered with their beautiful flowers. Those Asters are especially useful for cutting and 
decorating purposes, where their long stems and large, handsomo flowers produce tho moat 
pleasing effects. Pkt. 10c„ J] pkts. *250. 

NEW GIANT WHITE COMET ASTER. 

The \V bite Comet Aster is one of the handsomest flowers grown from seed, but the New 0(ant 
White Comet Is superior to it in size and beauty. The flowers arc often five inches across, with 
beautifully curled and twisted 
petals, making them look like 
fl n e s t Japanese Chrysanthe¬ 
mums. Undoubtedly the finest 
pure white Aster ever introduced 
and will be found a great addi¬ 
tion to any garden. Pkt. 10e., 

2 pkts. 25c. 


NEW JAPANESE ASTER. 


OTHER COMET ASTERS. 

All with Beautifully Ouried Petals and Flowers of the Largest Size. 

Rose and White— Very attractive. Petals pink edged with white. Pkt.lOc., U pkts.25c. 

Light Blue- A beautiful shade ofcolor. Pkt.lOc. 

Mixed Color? —A mixture of the finest Comet Asters. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

OTHER CHOICE VARIETIES OF ASTERS. 

Truffaut’s Paeony-flowered Perfection— One of the handsomest of all Asters. The 
flowers are very large and double, with incurved petals, producing a perfect hull. 
Plants grow 20 inches high and are covered with flowers. Our seed is a mixture of 
the most beautiful colors. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

VICTORIA— Two feet high. A truly magnificent Aster. A profuse bloomer; vigorous 
grower; large, beautiful flowers, 3 to 4 inches in diameter; mixed colors. Pkt. 10 c., 
3 pkts. 25c. 

DWARF CHRYSANTHEMUM-FLOWERED -One foot high. A splendid and very 
beautiful variety; flowers large and exceeding^- abundant; mixed colors. Pkt. 8c„ 
3 pkfs. 20c 

Betteridge’s Quilled— The newest and best form of quilled Aster. The plants continue 
to bloom later than any other variety. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

WASH INCTON — The l ary ot of all Alters, The flowers measure four inches In diameter, 
and are perfectly double and of fine form. We have a mixture of many beautiful 
colors. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

TRIUMPH The most beautiful of all dwarf Asters. The plants grow only about eight 
inches high, and are a perfect.mass of large deep-scarlet flowers of the finest form, with 
incurved petals Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

WHITE MICNON -A beautiful white Aster. The flowers are not large, hut are very 
double and are borne In great abundance. Pkt J0c. f 3 pkts. 25c. 

NEW ROSE Two feet high. Flowers large and double, resembling a rose; one of the 
most beautiful Asters. Mixed colors. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 



COMET ASTER. 









26 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


ASTERS—Continued. 

Harlequin—About twenty Inches high. Mixed colors. A very peculiar 
and beautiful variety. The petals are striped with different colors—red 
and white, white and blue, etc.,—producing a very pleasing effect. 
Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

CROWN— About twenty Inches high. One of the most beautiful Asters. 
The flowers have a white center, surrounded by a broad margin of blue, 
red, purple, etc. Flowers large and perfectly double. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 
25c. 

NINE VARIETIES OF ASTERS MIXED— We will send a mixture of 
the seed of Victoria, jjetterldge (Quilled, New Rose, German Quilled, 
Washington, Crown, White Mignon, Truffaut's Pa.-ony-Flowered Perfec¬ 
tion, and Dwarf Chrysanthemum-FJowered Asters. Pkt. 10c , 3 pkts. 25c. 

ABRONIA. 

A beautiful California plant, trailing along the ground and resembling j 
the Verbena. It has fragrant flowers, lilac and rose colored, and continue* 
to bloom all through the summer and autumn. 

Abronia Umbellata— Lllacand rose colored ; fragrant Pkt. 5c , 3 pkts. 12c 

A 

AGERATUM. 

An annual plant bearing fringe-like flowers. Especially useful lor 
bouquets, # 

Blue -Pkt. 5c. Pure White — Pkt, 5c. 


NEW DOUBLE BACHELOR’S BUTTON. 

Bachelor’s But¬ 
ton or “Corn Flow- 
f er”hasalways been 
a favorite flower; 
but now that we 
have this new 
double variety it 
should be doubly 
so. The plants are 
as vigorous and 
hardy as theold va¬ 
riety, and produce 
their double and 
semi-double flowers 
in the greatest pro- 
I fusion through the 
summer and late 
in the fall, even af¬ 
ter hard frost. Our 
seed is a mixture 
of the best colors. 

Pkt.lOc., 3pkts.25c. NEW DOUBLE BACHELOR'S BUTTON. 



AQUILEGIA.—COLUMBINE. 

Double Hon ays u cklc. 

A hardy perennial, easy of cultivation. The abundance of showy 
flowers early in the season, and their peculiar formation, renders this plant 
well wortiiy of a place in every garden. 

Fine Double, Mixed Colors— Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

SWEET ALYSSUM. 

A very pretty little plant, covered with pure white sweet-scented flowers, 
which are produced all through the summer. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

AMARANTHUS. 

The plant grows four or live feet high, and bears long tasseUllke flowers 
of a deep-red color, Pkt, 5e. 

BALLOON VINE. 

A rapid-growing vine with white flowers, followed by seed vessels 
resembling a small balloon. How seed In May. Pkt. 5c, 

BALSAMS. 

Theso charming flowers can easily ho grown In the open ground, and 
will flower abundantly. To gel Iho best results the plants should bo 
th I lined out to a foot apart, 

Jmprovod Double Cnmollln-NoworocJ Bal- 
unmn -These are the fluent lliilsums In 
existence, The flowers are vi rn large and 
imr/ci'llu double, and grow HO thickly on 
the stems that the plant presents a mass 
o( bloom from lop lo bottom. Our Hood Is 
of the very fluent strain, costing ten times 
ns much In (lorrnany ns any other variety. 

Mixed colors. Pkt. 2fto., 3 plcls, f»0o, 

Dwarf Double White Balsams -Bountiful 
double, pure white flowers, Pkt, lfto., 3 
pkts 25e. 

Double Spotted Large double flowers spoi¬ 
led with various colors. Very pretty. Pkt, 
lfto., 3 pkts. 95o. 

Rose Floworod -A most beautiful class, the 
flowers resembling small roses, and are 
perfectly double and of charming colors. 

Fine Doublo, Mixed A mixture of the llncst rose-flowered and spotted 
varieties. Pkt. 8u., 3 pkts, 2fto. 

The above five varlotlon mixed, per plu. Ho., 3 pkts. 20c. 

BARTONIA. 

A very hardy plant, bearing largo bright-yellow flowers In great 
profusion thioughout the summer and autumn. Very showy and 
attractive. 

Dwarf Golden Bartonla- Pkt. fto., 3 pkts. 2lo. 



ROSE-FLOWERED BALSAM. 
Pkt. UH\, 3 pkts. 25c. 


OTHER VARIETIES OF BACHELOR'S BUTTON. 


Emperor William— A new variety of a beautiful deep-blue color and with 
large flowers. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

VICTORIA— A new dwarf variety, growing only eight inches high and 
covered with dark-blue flowers all summer. Very pretty for edges or 
borders. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Mixed Colors —A mixture of the best single varieties. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 


CANNAS. 

A superb plant for decorating lawns and gardens. Their large glossy 
leaves and bright-colored flowers render them pre-eminent for this purpose. 
They can easily be grown from seed and flower the first year. 

CULTURE —If early plants are desired, sow the seed in pots ora box 
in the house about April 1st, It is a good plan to file off a part of the hard 
shell of the seed before planting, so that moisture can penetrate totheseed. 
The seed should he soaked In tepid water 24 hours before planting. Trans¬ 
plant to the open ground when danger of frost is past. The seed can also 
he sown in the open ground in May, whore they are to grow. The bulbs 
can bo taken up and stored in the cellar, and will he line plants the follow¬ 
ing year. 

Canna Sood— The handsomest named varieties of Cannas are grown 
from bulbs only, but some very nice ones can be rUsed from seed 
Wo odor seed of the large flowering French Cannas, which are by far the 
llncst Cannas grown. Ok. 25c., pkt. 10c. 

Canna Bulbs— See page35. 













JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


27 


CASTOR OIL BEAN—Ricinus. 

A very effective plant for lawn decoration or screens. Plant the seed 
when the soil is warm where the plants are to grow. It is well to put two 
or three seeds in a place and thin to one good plant. 

RICINUS CAMBODCENS1S. 

A gorgeous new variety. This is the most attractive and gorgeous 
variety of Castor Oil Bean that we have ever seen. The plants grow 
rapidly, and the dark reddish bronze leaves, with large red veins, present 
a most luxuriant and striking appearance. When young the leaves and 
stems are reddish brown, while the main stem is a lustrous black, produc¬ 
ing a gorgeous effect. Do not fail to sow it. Pkt. 10c., 3 plus. 25c. 
Sanguineus— A fine variety with dark red foliage. Pkt. 5c., 3pkts. 12c. 

COBOEA SCANDENS. 

A very rapid growing vine, growing from seed. From seed planted in 
the spring the vines will often grow 30 feet before fall, producing largo 
flowers of deep violetrblue color. 

CULTURE.—Plant the seed, edge down, in a pot or box, in April, and 
set out the plant when the soil is warm, or plant the seed where the vino 
is to grow after the soil is warm. 

Fresh Seed —Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

CONVOLVULUS, or MORNING GLORY. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed where the vines are to grow, early in the 
spring. The vine should be watered occasionally during dry weather. 
Convolvulus Major— The Climbing Morning Glory, mixed colors. Pkt. 
f.c , 3pkts. ]2c. 

Striped Rose and Mixed— A mixture of the finest striped roseand mixed 
colored Morning Glories. Pkt. 8c., 3 pkts. 15c. 

Convolvulus Minor— Vines are of dwarf habit, growing only about a foot 
high, flowers good sized and abundant. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

CALENDULA. 

A very charming flower belonging to the Marigold family, and culti¬ 
vated in the same way. 

Large Double-Flowered Meteor- A beautiful variety, with largo golden- 
yellow flowers with each petal striped with orange. The flowers arc 
perfectly double and often 3 inches in diameter. Pkt. 5c.,3 pkts., 12c. 

COCKSCOMB—Ceiosia. 

CULTURE -Sow the seed in the open ground when warm, and thin 
the plants to a foot apart. 



COCKSCOMB PYRAMIDALIS PLUMOSUM. 


Pyramldalis Plumosis— These Plumed Cockscombs arc very handsome, 
showy and attractive plants, growing about two feet high and covered 
with a mass of the most gorveous and brilliantly colored pluine-llke 
flowers. Mixed colors, crimson and golden. Pkt 8c , 3pkts. 15c. 
Glasgow Prize— Large, compact combs of a brilliant crimson color. 
Dwarf plants. Pkt 10c. 

Dwarf Mixed— A mixture of the dwarf crested varieties. Pkt 8c.. 
3 pkts, 15c. 


CLARKIA. 

Beautiful plants, blooming profusely ; easily grown and exceedingly 
attractive. About IS inches high. The seed can be sown in spring or fall, 
like Candytuft. 

Clarkia Elegans, Double Mixed Colors— Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

CANDYTUFT. 

Candytuft is a very hardy plant and can be 
! sown as soon as the frost Is out of the ground. 

It is a universal favorito and is used for beds, 
borders, edging, pots, etc. 

Dunnett’s Crimson -A beautiful rod varioty. 

Pkt. 6c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

WHITE ROCKET— A magnificent variety, 
with large spikes of pure white flowers. This 
is so great an improvement on tho ordinary 
Candytuft that it. would hardly be recognized 
as the same flower. Pkt. 10e., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Sweet Scented, Pure Whlte-A delicato and 
charming variety; choice seed; you cannot 
sow too much of it. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c,, 
oz. 35c. 

Mixed Colors A mixture of tho best, kinds and 

colors. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 10c., oz. 25o. WHITE ROCKET. 

CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

A handsome, hardy annual of vigorous growt h, clean foliage and beau¬ 
tiful flowers. A free bloomor, and continuing In flower very lato in the 
autumn. Cultivation similar to Asters. Those annual varieties must not, 
however, bo confounded with the poronnlal kinds, so largely grown by 
florists. 

Chrysanthemum, Tri-Color— 
Yellow and wliito single flow¬ 
ers. Plant grows about two 
foot high. Pkt. oq , 3 pkts. 12c. 
Dunnott’s Now Double White 
Tho flowers meusuro about 
two inches in dlaraotor and a 
largo pcrcontago of them arc 
perfectly double. Pkt. 5c., 3 
pkts. 12c. 

Dunnott’s Now Double Yel¬ 
low— Similar to tho above ex¬ 
cept In color, which 1 h bright 
yellow. Pkt. fie., 3 pkts. 12c. 
Coron, Double White Dwarf- 
Very popular, almost perfectly 
double, and continues In 
bloom very late In tho season. 
Wo picked a quantity of these 
charming dalsy-lllio (lowers 
November 10th. Pkt. 6c., 8 
DUNNETT’S NEW DOUBLE WHITE. pkts. 12c. 

COSMOS. 

One of the most attractive and useful annual flowers, now becoming 
very popular. The plant grows 3 to 5 feet high, with long graceful stems 
and fine leaves. Tho flowers resemble single dahlias, are notqulte so large 
and are very pretty and attractive for table or house decoration. The 
plants will endure a hard frost and will flower until late In the full. Tho 
plants can betaken up and potted and will grow and flower In the house 
for a long time. 

CULTURE.- If early blooming plants are 
desired sow the seed In a box in the house In 
March and transplant to the open ground in 
May, or sow the seed In the open ground about 
the first of May, and thin the plants to a foot 
apart. 

White -Large white flowers, line for cutting 
and decorating. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Mixed Colors— A mixture of all tho best col¬ 
ors so far produced, Pkt. 8c., 3 pkts. 16c. 

NEW DWARF YELLOW COSMOS -Tillsis a 
new and entirely d Istlnct variety of Cosmos. 

The plants grow only about a foot high, 
and produce a great profusion of small, 
bright yellow flowers, that are very pretty 
and attractive. The plants commence 
flowering early in the summer and con¬ 
tinue until killed by frost. This new Cos¬ 
mos is so easily raised and so orally that 
every one should have it Pkt. 10c , 3 
pkts. 26c. COSMOS. 











28 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897 


COREOPSIS. 


DIANTHUS, OR PINKS. 



GOLDEN WAVE COREOPSIS. 


One of the mostcharming 
and attractive of annual 
flowers, easily grown, and 
producing an abundance 
of flowers all through the 
summer and autumn. The 
plants are about two feet 
high, and should stand not 
less than one foot apart. 
Keep the soil free from weeds 
and you will have a bed of 
the cleanest, brightest and 
most attractlv e flowers of all 
shades of yellow and brown. 
Sow the seed In the open 
ground In the spring. 
GOLDEN WAVE-A most 
attractive and beautiful 
flower. The plants grow 
about 18 inches high,and 
are covered with golden- 
yellow flowers with ma¬ 


roon centers. A row or bed of these plants, with their long, graceful 
stems and bright foliage, In contrast with the gorgeous color of the 
flowers, present a most pleasing sight. The plants continue to flower 
through the summer and fall. Pkt. f>c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Bl-Color, Dwarf Mixed Flowers a little smaller than the above, and of 
every shade of rich maroon, yellow and brown. Very handsome. 
I'kt. 6c,, 8 pkts. 12c. 

GOLDEN KING A new dwarf variety, growing only 8 and 10 Inches 
high, and covered with flowers of the richest maroon bordered with 
.yellow. A very useful variety for edges and borders, where It will arid 
greatly to the beauty of a garden. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 2>c. 


I 


NEW MARGUERITE CARNATIONS. 


These now Carnations are really a great addition to ourout-door flowers. 
Hitherto Carnations could only bo grown In hot-houscs, but now, since we 
have the New Marguerite Carnations, they can he grown successfully In the 
open ground, and will flower within four months from the time of sowing 
the seed. The flowers are perfectly double, of good size, and beautifully 
fringed; and this, combined with their charming and varied colors and 
delicious fragrance, place them among the most desirable of all out-door 
flowers. The plants are dwarf and compact, and have stlfl’sloms that hold 
up the flowers well without support. The seed should ho sown early In the 
spring, In boxes In the house, and the plants set out In the open ground as 
soon an warm weather comes. The plants can ho taken up in the full and 
will flower a long Mine In the house. Pkt, 10c. f 8 pkts. 26c. 



Very popular and ef¬ 
fective flowers, easily 
raised, and afford a con¬ 
stant s u p p 1 y of bright, 
handsome flowers during 
the sumrnerand autumn. 

CULTURE.—Sow the 
seed early in the spring 
in the open ground, ana 
thin out the plants to a 
foot apart. The plants 
will last over winter and 
flower the next summer. 

New Single Dianthus. 

. We think everybody 
will appreciate these new 
varieties of Pinks, which 
are one of the most pop¬ 
ular and attractive of our 
hardy flowers. The great 
charrn of the single va¬ 
rieties lies in their exquisite coloring ; a bed or row of them is a perfect 
blaze of beauty. They can be sown in the open ground in the spring and 
will flower the first season. 

Crimson Bell— A charming single variety with large flowers of a beauti¬ 
ful, lustrous crimson. Pkt. 10c. 

The Bride—Flower single, large and beautifully fringed. The color is 
white on the edge with bright red shading to purple at the center, pro¬ 
ducing a very pleasing effect. Pkt. 10c. 

Snowflake—A pure white, single, fringed variety. Very beautiful. Pkt. 10c. 

Eastern Quee n— Very 
large, si ng 1 e dowel’s, 
beautifully shaded with 
rose and white. One of 
the most showy and at¬ 
tractive varieties. Pkt. 
10c. 

Four Varieties Mixed— We 

will send a mixture of 
the above four varieties 
for 10c. per packet. 

One packet each of the 
above four new varieties of 
Dianthus forZfic. 

DOUBLE VARIETIES. 

Laclniatus— This isa biau- 
tifill double-fringed va¬ 
riety. The flowers are 
very large and of many 
beautiful colors. Pkt. 
5c , 3 pkts. 12c. 
Heddewlgll, Double 
Japan Pink— Remark¬ 
ably large and double, 
and of brilliant colors. 
The flowers resemble 
Carnations. Oz. §1.00, 
3 pkts. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

umnonsis, Double Chinese Pink- Flowers very double and produced in 
clusters. Pkt. 6c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

NEW CYCLOPS PINK. 

A hardy, ever-blooming and fragrant Pink, coming true from seed. 
The rose and crimson single flowers, six Inches In circumference, have a 
delicate, dove-like fra¬ 
grance. They are borne 
In great profusion from 
May until frost, after the 
plant Is established, and. 

If the seed Is sown early 
In boxes in the house or 
hot-bed, will give abun¬ 
dance of flowers the first 
season. The plants grow 
from 12 to 15 inches high, 
and are very valuable for 
bedding as well as cut¬ 
ting, for when massed to¬ 
gether their mass of bloom 
produces a most brilliant 
effect, in addition, the 
plants are perennial,flow¬ 
ering with undlmlnlshed 
splendor for several years. 

We ad vise all our custom¬ 
ers to try this valuable 
novelty. Pkt. 10c.,3 pkts. 

~ :,C * NEW CYCLOPS PINK. 





SINGLE DIANTHUS. 












JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM. N. Y. 


DAHLIAS 

Dahlias, especially the 
single varieties, can easi¬ 
ly tye raised from seed by 
sowing the seed in a box 
or pot in February or 
March and transplant¬ 
ing into other pots as 
the plants commence to 
crowd Set in the open 
ground when warm and 
support with stakes. The 
plants will flower the 
first year, and the roots 
can be saved and will 
flower much earlier the 
second year. 

New Single Varieties— 

These are becoming a 
very popular and fash¬ 
ionable flower. Ourseed 
is a mixture of the fin¬ 
est single varieties with 
largest flowers and best 
colors. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 

2 5c. SINGLE DAHLIAS. 

Double Dahlias—Seed saved from the largest and finest Double Dahlias 
and will produce nearly all line double flowers. Pkt. 15c., 3 pkts. 35c. 

FORGET-ME-NOT—(Myosotis). 

A half-hardy perennial, easily grown from seed. It does best, in a 
moist situation. The cultivation of Forget-Me-Not Is quite similar to that 
recommended for Pansies. 

Myosotis Palustris—The True Forget-Me-Not. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkLs., 25c. 
Myosotis Sylvatlca-Large, beautiful flowers. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

FOXGLOVE—(Digitalis). 

Very easily grown and the long spikes of flowers are stately and bcati- 
tiful. Sow the seed in the spring and thin out to a foot apart. The plants 
will last for years without any protection. 

Digitalis Purpurea—Large purple-spotted flowers. Pkt. 5e., 3 pkts. 12c 

GOURDS. 

Cultivation similar to Squash. The vines can bo allowed to run on the 
ground, but Gourds are usually planted where the vines can run over a 
fence, arbor or old tree. They arc excellent climbers, and the fruit has 
such a variety of torms and colors that a collection of Gouids Is exceed¬ 
ingly interesting and attractive. 

Japanese Nest Egg—Fruit white and resembling an egg. Does not 
crack, and is not injured by ordinary heat and cold. A vigorous 
grower and a decidedly ornamental climber. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkLs. 12c. 
Dipper Courd—The fruit at one end Is longand sllmand bulges at the 
other end, and can be used for dippers. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkLs. 12c. 

Hercules’ Club-Fruit 3 to 4 feet long. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

FINE MIXED GOURDS—A mixture of a large number of the best sorts, 
including the best climbers. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

MIXED SMALL SORTS—A line mixture of a large number of small 
ornamental sorts Just imported from Germany. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

GAILLARDIAS. 

The Gaillardias arc not only strikingly 
beautiful but are very easily cultivated. The 
flowers of the single varieties measure from 
two to three inches ir diameter, and arc of 
every shade of yellow and red blended together 
in the most beautiful manner. Some flowers 
are yellow and red, edged with white, others 
are pure yellow, white and red, etc. Theplqnts 
grow low and spreading and the flowers are 
borne on long stems. The seed can be sown In 
the open ground and the plants will flower in 
the late summer and all through the fall, even 
after a frost. 

Single Gaillardias—Mixed colors. A mixture 
of .all the most beautifully colored single 
varieties. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts 25c. 

NEW DOUELE GAILLARDIAS. Double Gaillardias -Entirely different from 
the single varieties, the flowers being somewhat smaller and compact. 
Very attractive and pretty. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts 25c 





SINGLE GAILLARDIAS. 

HOLLYHOCKS. 


CULTURE.—Start tho plants In a 
hot-bod or box In tho house In March, 
or sow tho seed In the gardon In Juno 
or July. Thin out tho plants boforo 
they begin to crowd. Bcforo winter sots 
in thrown littlo straw or leaves over 
tho plants for protection. 

Fine Double—Mixed colors. Pkt. 8c., 

3 pkts. 20c 

CHARTER'S SUPERB 

HOLLYHOCKS. 

A new and magnificent strain of 
Hollyhocks. Tho flowers aro of tho 
largest size, perfectly double, and grow 
<•lo.se together on tho stem, forming a 
mass of tho most beautiful flowers, 
equal to Camellias. These aro undoubt¬ 
edly the finest Hollyhocks in existence. 

Pkt. lfc., 2 pkts. 25c. 

MIGNONETTE. 

CULTURE.—Sow in the open ground In tho spring and cut tho flowers 
frequent ly so that they will not go to seed. It can bo raised to advantage 
in a box in the house, where its delicious fragrance will be appreciated, 
MACHET—This is the largest and finest Mignonette. The plants arc of 
dwarf habit and producoan abundance of tho largest spikes of flowers 
we have ever seen on any Mignonette, being throe times as largo aH the 
c ommon kind, and continues in flower much longer. We highly 
recommend it for house or out-door culture. Its fragrance Is delicious 
Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Coldcn Queen Mignonette—Flowers of a golden yellow hue, large* and 
compact A very beautiful variety. Pkt. 10c;., 3 pkts. 25c 
Miles’ Hybrid 8plral—Very long spikes of flowers; an excellent variety. 
Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Sweet Mignonette—Very fragrant; largely grown for bees. lb.-lie., 
025. 15c., pkt. 5c. 

SWAN RIVER DAISY—(Brachycome). 

A pretty little plant, with small daisy-like flowers of two colors—blue 
and white. Pkt. 5c„ 3 pkts. 12c. 













30 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897 



MARIGOLDS. 


‘'LEGION OF HONOR ” MARIGOLD. 


These hardy, popular and beautiful flowers have been wonderfully improved. They are 
very easily grown, and are among our most attractive and satisfactory annual flowers. '[Qhe 
plants should be thinned out to at leasta foot apart for the dwarf and two feet for tall varieties, 
the dwarf varieties flower much earlier than the tall. 

** LEGION OF HONOR”— This new dwarf single variety has flowers of the brightest yellow 
and rnaroon, and make a beautiful show in a border or bed, and are also very pretty as cut 
flowers. (See Illustration.) Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Cold Striped— A double French dwarf variety of recent introduction. Plants grow one foot 
high and are covered with bright-colored double flowers in the greatest profusion. The 
petals are a beautiful red-brown, margined with bright yellow, producing a very pleasing 
effect. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Double French Dwarf— Plant grows about 1 foot high. Flowers orange, brown and yellow, 
mixed. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Double African Quilled— One of the largest and best varieties. Plant grows about 2 feet 
high. Flowers very large, measuring from 3 to 1 inches in diameter, perfectly double, and 
with quilled petals. Two distinct varieties, yellow and orange, mixed. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

NASTURTIUMS. 


There is no flower more easily raised than Nasturtiums, and they are so graceful and of 
such beautiful colors that they stand at the head of all annual flowers in merit and popularity. 
They are beautiful in beds and borders, and also are largely grown in hanging baskets and 
boxes outside of windows and on balconies. 

CULTURE.—-How the seed uU noon as the ground is warm in rows 2 feet apart, dropping a seed to each Inch of row. In boxes leave the plants 
3 or 4 inches apart 


LOBE'S IMPROVED NASTURTIUMS. 

These are the finest Nasturtiums In cultivation. The vines do not grow as long and rank as 
iho common tall Nasturtium, which often entirely hides the flowers, but are covered with a mass of 
the most brilliant colored flowers of the largest size and most charming appearance. A row or bed 
of these Nasturtiums Is nsurpassed for beauty and attractiveness, and will be a constant source of 
pleasure and object of admiration. They are decidedly the finest Nasturtiums for growing in boxes 
or baskets as well as for out-door culture. 

Lobb's Nasturtiums, Mixed— fdeluding all tho finest varieties and colors, from very dark red to 
tho lightest yellow. Pkt. 5c., oz. 20c., y lb. 50c. Our “ Collection No. 1” includes an ounce of 
thoso Nasturtiums. 

Tall Nasturtium— Very vigorous vines, growing 5 to 8 feet long; flowers of the largest size and of 
* beautiful colors. Pkt. 5c., oz, 12c., y lb. 25c., lb. $1.00. 

Dwurf Nasturtium, Tom Thumb— Plants only 18 Inches high; flowers of good slzcand brilliant 
colors. Pkt. 5c., oz. 15c., y s lb. IKlo. 

Empress of India— A very dwarf variety with (lavJc^jmrple leaves and deep-scarlet flowers. Pkt.8c., 
oz. 25c, 


NICOTIANA. 


This Isa remarkably handsome hardy annual flower. Tho flowers are very long, tubulous, pure 
white and dollelously fragrant. The plant Is a strong grower, with large loaves, and should bo given 
plr nly of room, say a footapart, Tho plnntand flowers are very ornamental and should bo In every 

garden. Pkt 10c. 




LOBB'S NASTURTIUMS. 


PHLOX DRUMMONDI. 

Phlox makes a magnificent show in beds and masses, where their brilliant and varied colors 

produce a gorgeous effect. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed in spring In rows 12 to 15 inches apart, and thin the plants to six 

Inches apart. 

STAR °F QUEDLINGBUR C H —Tilis new and interesting variety is distinct from all others 
In having tho center of each petal elongated, producing a very novel and pleasing effect 
Mixed colors. Pkt. lOc.,.3 pkts. 25c. 

Mixed Colors A mixture of all the finest colors and shades. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Brllllnnt Scnrlot Flowors largo and of an intensely brilliant scarlet color Very handsome 
Pkt. 8c. 

Pure White I^arge, clear white flowers. Pkt. 8c., 3 pkts. 20c. 

GRANDIFLORA PHLOX. 

Mixed Colors— This is an improved large flowering strain of Phlox. The flowers are nearly twice 
iho size of ordinary Phlox and of a great variety of the most brilliant colors and beautiful 
markings Pkt 8c., 3 pkts. 20c. 








JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


31 





PANSIES. a* 


CULTURE.—Sow the seed in a box in the house early in the 
spring, say from the 1st to the 20th of March. If the plants in 
the original box begin to crowd each other before the soil in the 
garden is readj- for them, transplant in another box in the house, 
or cold frame, or spent hot-bed covered with cloth sash. Set the 
plants in the open ground at least ten inches apart, and hoe 
frequently. A little nitrate of soda will have a wonderful effect 
on the size and brilliancy of the flowers. Apply a teaspoonful 
around each plant after setting out, but do not put it on the 
plant. 


BUGNOT'S SUPERB PANSIES. 

These are the flnest pansies in existence. The flowers are of 
the largest size and most beauti¬ 
fully marked and colored. This 
strain comprises a great variety 
of the richest and most striking 
colors, and most beautifully 
marked and striped varieties, 
which are so much admired by 
all lovers of this flower, and is 
unsurpassed by any pansies in 
cultivation, no matter under 
what name they are sold. Pkt. 

20c., 2 pkts. 35c. 


NEW GOLDEN-YELLOW PANSY. 

This is a most beautiful and novel pansy, distinct from all others. It 
is of the Odior or flve-spotted typo, and of a rich golden yellow. Everyone 
should have a few plants of this now pansy. Pkt. 15o. 

STRIPED AND MOTTLED PANSIES. 

This class comprises somo of tho most Interesting and attractive 
pansies, tho flowers bolng striped and blotched with a great variety of 
colors, making thorn very interesting and beautiful. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c, 
Wc will send one packet each of BugnoVs Superb , Trimavde.au , and Striped 
and Mottled Pamslcs for $C> cents. 

Now English Seedling Pansies— A lino strain of largo, brilliant flowers. 

Plant of strong, compact growth. Pkt. 10o., 3 pkts. 25c. 

New German Pansles-A mixture of the flnest large-flowering varieties, 
comprising many odd and beautiful colors. Pkt. 10e., 3 pkts 25c. 
Mlxod Colors A good mixture of many beautifully colored pansies. 
Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 


TRIMARDEAU OR GIANT PANSIES. 

These are the largest pansies grown. The flowers are of beautiful colors 
and good form, which, combined with their enormous size and vigorous 
and compact growth, places them among the flnest of all pansies. Pkt. 
10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 


A Mixture of Magnificent 
Pansies. 


The three largest.newestand 
most beautiful strains of pansies 

are Bugnot’s Superb, Odler 
or Clant Strained Pansies, STRIPED AND MOTTLED PANSY, 

and Cassler’s Clant Blotched 

Pansies. These three embrace all tho newest and most attractive colors and 
markings yet attained in pansies. Wo offer a mixture of these three superb 
strains, which is absolutely unsurpassed for novelty and variety. Pkt. 15c., 
2 pkts. 25c. 


at at PETUNIAS. at 


at 



Petunias arc particularly useful for beds and masses, where their bright, rich and varied colorings 
produce a brilliant effect on lawns and gardens. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed of tho-smaller varieties In the open ground whore tho plants are to 
grow. The seed is very small and should not bo covered more than a quarter of an Inch dcon. 1 ho 
larger-flowering varieties are best grown In polH or boxes and transplanted to the open ground when 
well started. 

NEW SINGLE FRINGED -The flnest of all slnglo-flowcrlng petunias. The flowers arc of tho largest 
size and beautifully fringed around the edges, and are of tho most delicate and charming colors. 
Pkt, 2flc. 

Double Fowerlng Fringed -The largest and finest of all petunias, hut very dlfllcult to raise. The 
flowers are very large, double and beautifully fringed, and of charming coloring. The seed is very 
small and dlfllcult to germinate, and as It Is very expensive, great care Hhould bo taken not to cover 
It too deeply or let It dry out. Pkt., containing not less than 50 seeds, 25c. 

Double Large Flowering-Similar to the above, except that the flowers are not fringed at tho edges, 
but curled in a charming and graceful manner. A very beautiful flower. Pkt., of not less than 
50 seeds 25c. 

Dunnett's New Hybrid, Striped and Blotched-A single flowering class, comprising many beautiful 
colors and markings. Excellent for beds or out-door culture, where they produce a mass of the 
most brilliant colors. Pkt 8c , 3 pkt*. 15c. 

Fine Mixed Sorts A mixture of the mostbrilllantrcolored, small-flowering single Petunias. Well 
suited for out-door culture. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

CRANDIFLORA-Magnlflcent large single flowers, unsurpassed In size and beauty of form and 
coloring. They are worthy of special care and attention and will repay for the trouble spent on 
them. Pkt. 16c., 2 pkts. 25c. 


NEW SINGLE FRINGED PETUNIAS. 


PORTULACA. 


Sow In a sunny spot 


Very pretty and attractive flowers for beds and borders, and easily raised from seed sown in the open K round in the spring 

and you will -oon have a brilliant show of flowers. nnrtuiaeas T1 k* flowers are double and resemble a perfect rose. Our seed is tho 

D °vI n.'”^nesPr^)mi^>aWe^mrd^^fl pro^ifcet^largfriKrcentageof b«iidiful ^ ^ 

Finest Mixed Varieties-A mixture of the iargestand most brilliantly colored single varieties Pkt. 6c., pkts. .. 








32 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


POPPIES. 



Dc,ublc Ranunculus-Flowered Poppy. 


Poppies are so easily grown and present sj gorgeous 
a display of beautiful colors and graceful flowers that 
everyone should have them in abundance. 

CULTURE.—Sow the seed early in the spring in rows 
or scatter on the surface of the ground and press in with 
a board or the back of a spade. Thin the plants out to 8 
or ifj inches apart. 

DOUBLE RANUNCULUS-FLOWERED 
POPPY. 

Our cut gives a better description of these Poppies 
than we can in words, but the colors which make the 
Poppy such an attractive flower must be seen to be appre¬ 
ciated. Do not fail to sow them. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkls. 20c. 

NEW TULIP POPPY. 

The flowers much resemble a bright scarlet tulip and 
arc very unique and attractive. The flowersare borneon 
long stems and protrude well above the foliage. Abed 
or mass of these popples presents a most gorgeous blaze 
of color and will be an ornament to any garden. Ifsown 
early, the plants flower all through the summer and 
autumn. Pkt. I0c.,3 pkts. 25c. 



EARLY BLUSH POPPY. 


NEW CARDINAL POPPY. 

A magnificent large, double Poppy of a glowing scarlet color. The ! 
plants are of dwarf or compact growth, and produce their enormous, ball- 1 
like flowers in great profusion and continue In flower an unusually long 
lime. The cut of Fairy Blush” gives a very good Idea of the shape of this 1 
Poppy. 1 1 , will be a pleasure to all who grow It. Pkt. luc., 3 pkts. 20c. 

FAIRY BLU8H (See Cut )—This beautiful Poppy Is of the largest size and 
perfectly double; the color Is white, with the end of each petal Upped 
Willi rose color, giving the flowers a very delicate appearance. Pkt. f.c., I 
3 pkts. J 2 c. 

MIKADO This Poppy much resembles the Fairy Blush, except that the i 
petals are more deeply fringed and curled much liken Japanese Chrys¬ 
anthemum, Color white, tipped with crimson. Pkt. 6 c., 3 pkts. 12c. 
Shirley Poppies These are the most delicately colored and graceful of all 
popples. The flowers are single and are produced on long, slender 
stems, put their groat beauty lies in the exquisite coloring of the 
flowers, which are of all shades of delicate pink rose color, shading in a 
single flower from pure white to deep rose or crimson, which must be 
seen to he appreciated. Pkt, 10c., 3 plcts. 20c. 

•Double Carnation Immense globular flowers borne on long stems. The 
flowers are so double that they aro as round as a ball, and are of many 
striking colors. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12o. 

Umbroslum— A single flowering doop scarlet poppy with a black spot at 
I lie base of oacli petal. Will lust longor uftor being picked than any 
other poppy, Pkl. 5c., n plcts. 12c. 

SALPIGLOSSIS. . 



A very gracoful 
orchid like flower, 
growing about 2 
feot high, with 
large boll shaped 
flowers. Tho now 
and largo flower¬ 
ing varieties havo 
flowers measur¬ 
ing 3 Inches in di¬ 
al iinter, and of the 
most beautiful 
colors. Tho coin- 
li I nail o n s of 
shades of color 
and the beautiful 
markings on the 
flowers are truly 
wonderful. Culti¬ 
vation sumo as 
Asters. 


SALPIGLOSSIS GRANDIFLORA. 


Crandlflorn, 
Largo Flower¬ 
ing Mixed col* 
ors. A new and 


greatly Improved variety, Flowers largo, beautifully colored and 


marked. In their coloring and general appearance they muelv resemble 
orchids. Pkt. 10c., 0 pkts, 25c. 


i 


SENSITIVE PLANT. 

A curious and really wonderful plant, which shows sensibility to touch, 
if the leaves or stems of the plan tare given a slight rap with the finger¬ 
nail, they curl up and droop, but will soon recover. Sow the seed in the 
open ground In the spring. Pkt. £c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

SUNFLOWER. 

Sunflowers make very ornamental screens, and the seed is useful for 
poultry food, for which it Is often grown in large quantities. 

Texas Silver Queen-A new variety with very attractive silvery foliage. 
Tho plants grow 4 to 5 feet high, with numerous branches forming a 
bush dotted from top to bottom with small-sized bright yellow flowers 
which arc very pretty in contrast with the silvery foliage. If large, 
plants arc desired early in the summer, sow the seed in boxes and 
transplant to the open ground when ready. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 
Double California- -The flnest Double Sunflower. Plant grows 5 or 6 feet 
high, and the flowersare large, deep yellow and very double. Pkt. 5c , 
3 pic it. 12c., oz. 40c. 

Mammoth Russian -Vory large sized flowers, bearing an abundance of 
seed. Pkt. 5c , oz 10c., % lb. 15c., lb. 60c. 

SWEET WILLIAM—(Dianthus Barbatus*) 

A universally admired perennial flower that when once started will 
last for years. Sow tho seed In the open ground in the spring or fall. 

Mixed Colors -Pkt. fic., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Perfection— Extra largo flowers of many beautiful colors and markings. 
Pkt. he., 3 pkts. 20c. 

SALVIA. 

A very ornamental plant, growing about two feet high, and covered 
with long spikes of brilliantly colored flowers. Very attractive on lawns 
and borders and useful for cut flowers. 

CU LTURE.—Sow the seed in a box In the house or hot-bed, in March, 
and set out the plants In tho open ground when danger of frost is over. 
Tho plants should be 12 to 18 inches apart and kept free from weeds. 

Salvia Splendons iS:arlcb Sage )—Brilliant scarlet flowers borne on long 
spikes, that literally cover tho plant. The finest variety and one of the 
most ornamental plants in cul¬ 
tivation. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Salvia Paten*— Tho flowers <£ 
a rich, intense blue, Tho 
plant is not so vigorous or 
compact in growth as the 
Splendens. Pkt. 15c., 3 pkts. 

05C. 

SANVITALIA. 

A very pretty bright yellow 
flower, growing on a half creep¬ 
ing plant In tho greatest abund¬ 
ance. The flowers rosemblo a 
double daisy, and are bright, 
attractive and so easily grown 
that no flower garden should be 
without them. Cultivate like 
Pnlo v. 

Sanvltnlla Procumbens, fl.pl. 

'Clio flnest (limbic flowers. 

Pkt 5o , 3 pkts 12c 



SANVITALIA PROCUMBENS. 

















JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


33 


of SWEET PEAS. ^ 


No one should think of being without a good supply of these beautiful, sweet-scented flowers. They are easily raised 
and will give more pleasure and enjoyment for little trouble than any other dowers. 


CULTURE.—Sow very early in the spring in rows feet apart, 
dropping two or three seeds to the inch. Weed carefully, and when 
the plants are well started, place brush, stakes, wires or string for 
them to run on. Pick all the flowers as fast as they bloom, and 
they will keep on flowering for months. 

NEW DWARF SWEET PEA—“Cupid.” 

A Dwarf Sweet Pea that is no more trouble to raise than Mari¬ 
golds or Poppies certainly will be welcomed by every lover of this 
charming flower. 

Cupid is the first dwarf sweet pea that has ever been produced. 
The plants grow only live or six inches high and produce larye 
white flowers that are so abundant that they nearly hide the foliage. 
Cupid commences to flower very cai'ly and continues in bloom until 
killed by the frost. Abed or border of these pure white, delicate, 
sweet-scented flowers is a beautiful sight and a constant source of 
pleasure. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

THE BEST NEW VARIETIES. 

Among the hundreds of varieties of sweet peas we think the fol¬ 
lowing are the best as grown on our trial grounds under ordinary 
culture: 

Countess of Radnor— Lavender— A beautiful color. One of the 
most attractive varieties we have. Especially handsome when 
kept pure by itself. Pkt. 5c., oz. 10c., y pt. 25c., pt, 80c. 
DOROTHY TENNANT— Rose Mauve— A soft and beautiful 
pink. Flowers large and expanded. Being of one color it Is very 
attractive when bunched by itself. Pkt. 6c., oz. 10c., pt. 25c., 
pt. 80c. 

BO RE ATTON —Deep Maroon — The handsomest dark colored 
sweet pea. Flowers large and expanded—very distinct and 
beautiful. Pkt. 5c , oz. 10c., % pt. 25c., pt. 75c. 

EMILY HENDERSON— While—This new white sweet pea is not 
only large and perfectly pure white but it blooms very early and 
profusely. It is the best white sweet pea. Pkt. 5c., oz. 10c., y 
pt. 25c., pt. 75c. 

BLANCHE FERRY -Pink ami TP/ittc-Thls is the earliest and 
most prolific sweet pea. The flowers are large and produced in 
such profusion that the vines are covered with them before 
other varieties have commenced to show a bloom. Pkt. 6c., 
oz. 10c„ y pt. 25c., pt. 70c. 

Eckford’s New Varieties Mixed— This mixture includes the finest 
new varieties produced by Mr. Henry Eckford, of England, who 
has done more to improve the sweet pea than any man living. 

'The flowers are of large size and of a great variety of colors and 
markings. Very much superior to ordinary “mixed” sweet 
peas. Pkt. 5c., oz. 10c., % pt 20c.. pt, 60c., qt. $1.00. 

STANDARD VARIETIES. 

PAINTED LADY - Rose and White— One of the oldest and most 
popular varieties. Pkt. 5c.. oz 10c., y pt. 20c., pt. CUc. 

Scarlet Invincible— Brilliant scarlet flowers. Pkt. 5c., oz. 10c , 
pt. 20 c., pt. 00c. 

Pure White Price same as above. 

Mixed Colors— A mixture of many different colors and varieties, 
including some very attractive kinds. Pkt. 5c., oz. 10c., y pt. 
15c., pt. 35c., qt. 65c. 




STOCK- T ° Weeks. 

A very popular flower and 
easily raised. The plants 
grow about a fooL high and 
produce the flowers in clus¬ 
ters on the stems, as shown 
in the cut. Culture the same 
as asters. 

New Large Flowering 
Dwarf. 

Flowers of the largest size 
and perfectly double, and of 
many beautiful colors and 
delicate fragrance. The finest 
of all stocks. Pkt. 10c., 3 
pkt*. 25c. 

English Stock Mixed eo 1- 
ors. Pkt. 5c.. 3 pkts. 12c. 



TEN WEEKS STOCK-Largo Flowering Dwarf. 



















34 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


VERBENA. 



TlilH beautiful flower can 
easily be raised from seed by 
sowing itin boxes and trans¬ 
planting the plants to the 
open ground v/hen danger 
of frost is past, v/hen they 
will flower abundantly all 
summer. 

Verbena Hybrida —Mixed 
colors. Pkt. 8c., 8 pkts. 

20c. 

VERBENA H Y B R I DA, 

A.A. I -Heedgrown with 
<reat care from the lart/- 
cxl, and hand ho raexL 
flowers, and is the finest 
strain of Verbenas in 
cultivation, producing 
flowers of the Uirycxt hIzc 
and finest colors. X'kt. 

15c„ 8 pkts. 35c. 

WALL FLOWER. 

A half-hardy perennial, 

easily grown from good seed VERBENA HYBRIDA. 

either in a box in the house 
or In the open ground. Get three packeLs of the seed. How one packet In 
a box in the house and the other two In a warm border In the garden. 


The plants are perennial, but in this climate need to be taken up for the 
winter. 

Wall Flower, Largest Flowered, Mixed Colors— The best of seed; sure 
to grow. 3 pkts. 12c., pkt. 5c. 

Covent Carden— The finest variety. 3 pkts. 26c., pkt. 8c. 

ZINNIA. 

The Zinnia is admirably adapted to our -*.limate. It is remarkably 
healthy and vigorous, easily grown and flowers abundantly. It has been 
vastly improved. Many of the flowers are as large and double as a dahlia, 
and of beautiful colors. Sow early in the spring in rows 15 or 20 inches 
apart and thin oat the plants before they begin to crowd. 

NEW ZEBRA ZINNIAS— Very large, double flowers, many of which 
are striped with two or three different colors, which gives a very 
attractive appearance to the flowers. Pkt. 10c., 3 pkts. 25c. 

Zinnia Elegans— Single. Finest mixed. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Zinnia Tall Double— Splendid and very showy large double flowers. 
Mixed colors. Pkt. 5c., 3 pkts. 12c. 

Dwarf Double Zinnia— Dwarf plant, double flowers of beautiful colors. 
Pkt. 5c , 3 pkts. 12c. 

NEW DOUBLE GIANT (Grandljlora Robnsta Pleniimima )—Mixed colors. 
A splendid new variety with flowers of great size and beauty. Pkt. lue., 
3 pkts. 25c. 


Collections of the Finest Flower Seeds at One-half Price 


Thirty Choicest New Varieties, Worth $2.4 I ; Price, $1.00. 


COLLECTION NO. U 

This collection is composed of the following Choice Varieties of Annual Flowers which are easily grown, 1 
and will produce a constant succession of beautiful flowers all through the summer and fall. 

Please notice that these are not cheap, common varieties, but are the finest grown. The seeds would cost 


at Catalogue rates, or of any seedsman, $2.41. We will ; 

Regular /V/jv. 


AQTER8— Ono pkt, oiioh Co met, mixed colors, Piconu- Flowered 

mnl Crown ... 33 

Bnoholor’n Button-Now Double, l pkt. 10 

Buluttmti Hone- flowo rod, 1 pkt... io 

Cnlonduln Mo tool', I pkt... 05 

CANDYTUFT One pkt. each White ltocl(clniu\ Sweet Sccntcil . 10 

Chrysanthemum One pkt. New Double White. 05 

Cosmos One pkt, euoli Now Dwarf Yellow and Mixed Colors. 18 

Coreopsis Ono plct. each (loldon Wavo and Ill-Color. 10 

Dlunthuu One pkt eaoli Now Single 4 Varllolo8 and Double Ln- 

elnlutiiM. 15 


;nd them all for $1.00. 

Regular Price. 


Caillardlas— Ono pkt. each Single and Double. 20 

Marigold— Double African Quilled. 05 

Mlgn onotte— Ono pkt. each Macket and Golden Queen. 20 

Nasturtiums -Ono oz. Lobb’s Improved, mixed colors. 20 

Phlox Drummondl— Orandiflora, mixed colors. 08 

POPPIES— Ono pkt. each Ranunculus Flowered, Fairy Blush, 

Shirley and Now Tulip. 20 

Swoot Peas-% pint Eckford’s New Varieties, mixed colors. 20 

8alplglossls— Now Large Flowering. io 

Zinnia-Now Double Giant. 05 


Total cost at regular rates. $2.41 


COLLECTION NO. 2. 

This collection is intended for small gardens, and is composed of 20 packets of the best varieties of Hardy 
Annual Flowers, worth $1.10. We will send it postpaid for 50 cents. 


ASTERS -Ono pUt, euoh AVir Him ami Crown 

Bachelor's Button -Now Double. 

Candytuft White Rookot. 


Regular Price. 

. 20 

. 10 

. 10 


Regular Price. 

Marigold -One pkt. each Double African, Quilled and Gold 

Striped. 10 

Nasturtium -Lobb’s Improved, mixed colors. 05 

Petunia— Fine mixed sorts. 05 

Chrysanthomum Now Double White . 0o i Popples— Ranunculus Flowored, Fairy Blush and Shirley . 15 


Coroopsls Golden Wave.. 

Dlunthun l.aethlatus. 

Calllardla# Single, mixed colors 


05 

06 

10 


Sweet Peas— Ouc oz. Eckford’s New Varieties, mixed.. 


10 


Total cost at regular rates....ji.i 

















































JOSEPH HARRIS CO.. MORETON FARM. N. Y. 


35 


FLOWERING PLANTS AND BULBS. 




We pack the roots carefully and guarantee 


BEGONIAS —(T uberous-Rooted.) 


The following flowers are best grown from roots set out in the spring, 
their delivery in good condition. 

New Double Anemone —“ Whirlwind.” 


Anemones have long been considered to be among the most beautiful full-flowering 
perennial plants for outdoor culture. This New Double Anemone will, therefore, be 
welcomed by all, as it possesses all the advantages of the old single white variety, and 
in addition is much handsomer and hardier. The plants have passed through our 
most severe winters, without protection of any kind, uninjured. The plants grow 
about three feet high, and produce their beautiful large whito flowers on long stems in 
the greatest profusion. This is a beautiful plant for lawn decoration, and once started 
will last a great many years. Plants set out in the spring will bloom in tlio fall. 
Plants by mail 20c. each, 3 for 50c. By express, $1.75 per dozen. 


NEV/ TUBEROUS-ROOTED BEGONIAS. 


These now large flowering Be¬ 
gonias arc magnificent, plants for 
beds in the open ground. One 
who has not seen them can hard¬ 
ly imagine the brilliant and gorg¬ 
eous effect produced by their large, 
richly-colored foliage and their 
beautiful waxy flowers of bright 
and varied colors. If the bulbs 
are started early, the plants will 
commence to flower in July and 
continue in constant bloom until 
frost. The flowers are from three 
to four inches across, and are 
borne in great profusion, almost 
covering the plant from sight. A 
bed of these Begonias will excite 
the admiration of all beholders, 
and bo a constant delight to Its 
owner. The bulbs should be 
skirted about tho first of April In 
small pots plunged in boxes of 
earth in the house or hot bod,and “ WHIRLWIND " ANEMONE, 

the plants set out in tho open 

ground as soon as all danger of frost Is over. We oiler tho bulbs of single-flowered Begonias, 
mixed colors, for 15c. each, or 81.50 per close., postpaid. 


CANNAS. 



For lawn decoration 
flowers make a beautiful display in beds and borders. 


s there is no plant equal to the improved varieties of Cannas. Their bright, luxuriant foliagoand Jong spikes of brilliant 

CULTURE.—Hot out the bulbs in the spring when tho ground has become warm. The soil 
should be made very rich by applying manure or fertilizers. Hot out the bulbs two feet apart each 
way, and cover them two inches deep with earth. Tho bed should bo watered during dry 

weather. LARGE-FLOWERING FRENCH CANNAS. 

These improved cannas are ho much superior to the old varieties that they are now universally 
used. They bloom early, and tho flowers are twice tho size of tho common 
cannas. Wo offer a few of the host varieties. 

Madam Crozy-The most popular variety. Planks grow only three to four 
feet high, and produce flowers of tho largest size. Color deep scar¬ 
let edged with gold. The foliage Is green and very handsome. Dor¬ 
mant bulbs 15c. each, $1.50 per dozen, postpaid. 

Alphonse Bouvler-Flowers a rich glowing crimson, largo and handsome; 
foliage dark green. Plant grows six feet tall, and is best suited for the 
center of the bed, where It is very effective. Dormant bulbs 15c. each, 

$1.50 per dozen. 

j. D. Cabos— Purple foliage; grows about five feet high; flower a rich orange, 
large and very showy. Its purple leaves make this variety especially 
useful for bedding with the green-leaved variety, 
each, $1.75 per dozen. 

Mixed Varieties Large flowering French varieties, mixed colors, 
bulbs l‘2c. each, $1.00 per dozen. 


Dormant bulbs 20c. 


Dormant 


TUBEROSES. 


NEW DWARF FRENCH CANNAS. 


Tuberoses are very easily raised In the open ground in the summer, and 
are very ornamental. The flowers have an Intensely sweet fragrance. Tho 
bulbs should beset out as soon as the soil Is warm In the spring, and will 
flower In August and Beptember. 

Excelsior Dwarf Pearl -The best variety. Flowers large, pure white, and 
double, and crowded on the stalk. Large bulbs 5c. each, per dozen 
40c., by mall, postpaid. 


DOUBLE PEARL 
TUBEROSE 










36 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR i897. 


HARDY ROSES. 


LARGE 2-YEAR-OLD PLANTS AT 
LOW PRICES. 





vers are 


Everyone who ban a garden or lawn should have a few Hardy Hybrid Perpetual Roses. Everyone admires a beautiful rose, but few appreciate how 
easily they can be raised and what a pleasure it is to have an abundance of magnificent, large, fragrant roses on their own grounds. We have a large 
number of rose bushes on our grounds that require very little care and are the admiration of all who see them. 

In our experience we have found that the only really satisfactory plants to set out are good, strong out-door grown plants of varieties classed as 
“ Hybrid Perpetual#.” The small, greenhouse-grown plants offered by most dealers do not as a rule amount to much, and even if they live do not flower 
the first season. Monthly or ever-blooming roses cannot be grown in the open ground in the Northern States with any degree of satisfaction by the ordi¬ 
nary gardener. Hybrid Perpetual roses are all perfectly hardy and flower in June and July and again in September and October, and the flowe 
very large and beautiful, much superior to the old “June roses.” 

• CUT/CUllE ,—First obtain good, strong out door grown plants. Set them out earljj 
in the soring (or in the autumn) in good rich soli in a sunny situation. The plants 
should be set three feet apart each way. Prune the plants severely before setting out 
(when sent by mail we prune them ready to set ouu. After they are through flower¬ 
ing in July cut back the new growth to induce a second flowering A dressing of a 
mixture of equal parts nltrateof soda and superphosphate applied in the spring and 
worked into the soil for a foot all around the plants lias a wonderful effect on their 
growth arid flowers. Use a good handful to each plant. The first year after set- 
ting outlt is best to bend the plants down in the fall Just before the ground freezes, 
and cover them with leaves and a Jlttle earth. Tills is easily and quickly done and 
will insure a good, healthy growth in the spring. 

HARDY HYBRID PERPETUAL ROSES. 

THE BE8T VARIETlE8. 

We have selected the following varieties of hardy roses, boLh new and old, lor 
their merit. J. he list is not Jong but It contains the ereeim of the hard // rosea and every 
one will give the best of satisfaction. Weespeclaily recommend the varieties printed 
In capitals: 

ANNE DE DIE8BACH— A vigorous grower; bright carmine, 
flowers very large, fragrantand well shaped. 

Baronne Provost -Bright rose color; a very vigorous grower; flowers very large, 
full and fragrant; perfectly hardy. 

Bolle of Normandy—HU very rose color; very large and full; a beautiful rose. 

MARGARET DICK80N -A new while roue of great beauty. The flowers are of the 
handsomest form; large and deliciously fragrant; perfectly hardy and a profuse 
bloomer. 

Madam Plantlor Pure white. A profuse bloomer; a veru hard// white rose; needs 
no protection. Blooms only In June. 

ULRICH BRUNNER a new rose of great beauty; flowers large, full and of a 
beautiful shade of bright red. One of the best. 

GENERAL JACQUEMINOT— Flowers brilliant crimson, large and very fragrant; 
a strong grower and perfectly hardy. On the whole, the very best and most popu¬ 
lar red rose, 

BARON BON8TETTEN A very dark crimson rose; large, full and very beautiful. 

La Rolno A beautiful pink rose; flowers very large and double. 


an exquisite color; 


MME. GABRIEL LUIZET. 


MARGARET DICKSON. 

Comtosso do Soronye— A beautiful flesh-colored rose; very double. 
^^fonn^°* 0rnl5 ^°* or 11 beautiful shade of carmine; flowers of large size and fine 

MME. GABRIEL LUIZET —A now rose of great beauty; color silvery pink The 
lowers are large and full, with curled petals. One of the most beautiful'of all 
hardy roses. 

Prineo Camille do Rohnn-Ono of the darkest of all red roses; petals have a 
beautllnl volvoty texture; very fragrant. 

PAUL NEYRON - Dark rose color; flowers enormous in size, of fine form and 
very double; one of the finest of the perfectly hardy, vigorous-growing roses. 

PPIC ,^. OF . ABOVF ROSES.—Wo offer extra fine, large, 2-year-old 
plan 1 Hof the above varieties. 'I hose plants are from the open (/round, and when 
set early In the spring will flower the first season. These nlants must not 
bo confounded with the little hot-house grown plants sold by most dealers Such 
p ants do not flower the first year and are not satisfactory' in many ways All the* 
p ants wcolTcr are grown on their own roots, and will not, therefore, revert to t he 
wild stock, as do budded or grafted planLs. 

PLANTS BY MAIL or ev press prepaid. Any of the above varieties 35c. each; 

au.y 0 for $1.50, or one plant each of the whole 14 varieties for $3.25. 

PLANTS BY EXPRESS not prepaid. Per dozen $2.50, or one plant each of 
the above 14 varieties for$2.8o, or any greater number at 20e. each. 

CLIMBING ROSES. 

Very useful for scrconRor to cover the side of a house or piazza. They will 
often gmyv 10 or 15 feet In a single season. 1 * 

CRIMSON RAMBLER -A new hardy climbing rose that has created a great 
sensation. 1 he flowers are a brilliant crimson and grow in *'rcat clusters A 
largo plant when In full bloom Is a gorgeous sight, i-year-old dormant plants 
from open ground 60o. each. 3 plants for S1.00, postpaid. 1 

Ba r!"J° r ° BoMe 1>a, ° b,ush * almost white; very pretty. 2-year-old plants 35c. 
QU 3^ n ?u f c t h e Pra,r, °“** r, 8 llt ' rose color. A very rapid grower. 2-year-old plants 









JOSEPH HARRIS CO., MORETON FARM, N. Y. 


37 


^ dt SMALL FRUIT PLANTS, s 


WE MAKE A SPECIALTY of sending plants BY MAIL. In this way we can save our customers the heavy express charges which 
are often demanded on small packages of plants, which can be sent by mail for half the money. . Wc send FIRST-CLASS LARGE SIZE 
plants by mail and not small, inferior stock with which many dealers fill mail orders. «.* ^ </* u* 

WHEN PLANTS ARE ORDERED at the prices given below, we deliver them to the purchaser either by mail or express as we think 
best, without any extra charge. •-** v* ^ u< 

ORDER EARLY. Early orders are of course filled first, and the plants sent in the best possible condition. All plants except straw¬ 
berries should be ordered before April 1st. Later orders will be filled as fast as possible, but the plants arc never as satisfactory as those 

sent before the buds start. 

FOR PRICES OF LARGER QUANTITIES, to be sent by express or freight, see Price List on page 39. u* v* 

Eureka (Z 5 )—It is Justus important to have a very laic strawberry as a very 


STRAWBERRIES. 

The best time to set out Strawberries is in the Spring, when they will 
grow all Summer and form a good bed of plants that will bear profusely 
the following year. 

The plants should be set out in good rich ground in rows 2% to 3 feet 
apart and the plants a foot apart in the rows. When setting the plants 
care should be taken to spread out the roots and press some moist soil 
firmly around them. It is best to set out the plants as soon as the ground 
can be gotten into good condition in the Spring, but they will do very well 
i f set out as late as the middle of May. 

Varieties marked ( P) have pistillate or imperfect flowers and should 
have some other perfect-flowering variety growing near to fertilize the 
flowers. Use one perfect-flowering plant to every t hree or four imperfect- 
flowering plants. 

THE BEST VARIETIES. 

Among tLe hundreds of varieties, we think the following are the best of 
both the new and older varieties: 

VAN DEMAN — 27jc Earliest— On our grounds tills has proved to be the 
earliest Strawberry'. It does not merely’ give a few early berries but 
ripens the whole crop very’ early’ and within a short time. The berries 
are of good size, bright crimson, firm and of excellent flavor. The 
plants are vigorous and productive. Dozen 35c., 50 $1.00,100 $1.50. 



GREENVILLE. 

CREENVILLE (P)—This Isa magnificent Strawberry’—one of the largest, 
handsomest and most attractive berries we have* ever grown, and t he 
plants produced lot-s of them. The plants are stocky, with large, vig¬ 
orous. dark, green leaves. The quality Is excellent. The plants are 
very vigorous and wonderfully productive. This, together with IN 
large, showy fruit and good shipping qualities, places the Greenville In 
the front rank. Few strawberries have given such universal satisfac¬ 
tion wherever grown as this. If you wanta big errr/j of the largest berries 
plant the Greenville. Dozen 30c., 60 G0c. f 100 $1.00. 

Parker Earle—When given good cultivation this Is probably the most 
productive strawberry’In cultivation. The enormous quantity of fruit 
borne on a single plant Is simply wonderful. The berries are medium 
to large size, oval in shape and of good color and quite Arm. The plant* 
are remarkably vigorous and when given good rich land, not too light, 
and clean cultivation, will produce an astonishing crop of fine straw¬ 
berries. This is a magnificent variety for those who know how to 
handle it. Dozen 30c., 5070c., 100 $1.35. • 


early’one. The late ones, in fact-, are often the most profitable for 
market, and for homo use wo want strawberries as long ns wo can got 
them. The Eureka supplies this want. Itls a very late bony and the 
fruit is largo, firm, of lino color and good quality. The plants are 
vigorous and productive. Dozen 25c , 50 00c., 100 $1.00. 

BUBACH (Z J )— One of the largest ofall strawberries. Tho berries are often 
1% to 2 inches in diameter and of good quality. Tho vines are very 
vigorous and productive. Tho fruit is rather soft, for shipping long 
distances, but for near market its groat size and ImndBomo appearance 
make it command tho highest prices. Dozen 25o., 50 G0o„ 100 $1.00. 
WARFIELD (P)—One of the best varieties for homo uso or market, it. is 
verg carlg yotcontlnues to bear fora long time. Tho berriesaro uniform 
In size, of a very deep, glossy’ rod, and of fine quality. The plants are 
very' productive. Tho berries aro so smooth, handsome and of such an 
attractive color that they aro always welcome in markot or on tho 
table. Dozen 25c., 50 OOo., 100 $1.00. 

Crescent—A very popular carlg variety. Enormously productive and a 
vigorous grower. Quality fair. A profitable market variety. Dozen 
25c , 50 46c.. 100 75c. 

Wilson—There is still no variety equal to tho old Wilson for canning. 
When fully’ ripe it is of high flavor and excellent for tho tablo. It Is 
early’ and productive. Dozen 25o., 50 50c., 100 85c. 

Shnrploss— A very largo berry of tluo quality. Popular for homo use and 
market. Dozen 25c., 60 60o., 100 85o. 

SPECIAL COLLECTION of tho THREE BEST STRAWBERRIES. 

Wc will send a collection of so PLANTS OF VAN DEAfAN 
(the earliest), 40 OF GREENVILLE {medium), and 40 OF 
EUREKA {the latest), joo plants in all, J 1 Y MAIL, POSTPAID, 
for SI.OO. This will make a nice Strawberry had of tho finest 
varieties now grown. 

RASPBERRIES. 

Set out in rows four or five feet apart and throe feotupart In the row. 
Spread out the roots horizontally, and especially in Urn cuho of Black 
Raspberries, do not set them too deep. Two or three Inches of fine soil, 
pressed down firm with the foot, Is all that Is needed. By putting two 
plants in a hill you have a double chance of avoiding missing hills 
or gaps. 

CUTHBERT, or Quoon of tho Market— With us tho most satisfactory 
variety In tho Cuthbert. It is a remarkably vigorous grower, very hardy 
and enormously productive Berries extra large, sometimes three 
inches In circumference; remarkably Urm and of excellent quality, 
conical in shape, of a rich crimson color, and, taking it all in all, It will 
be probably some time before we get a better Raspberry. dozen 25c„ 
dozen 35c., 50 85c., 100 31.50, 

GOLDEN QUEEN This is the finest Yellow Raspberry. It resembles 
the Cuthbert in all respects except In color, which is a beautiful golden 
yellow, making tho berries very attractive In appearance. % dozen 26c., 
dozen 40c., 60 $1.00. 

MARLBORO— One of the largest and best carlg Raspberries. Hardy and 
productive. The berries are bright scarlet and very attractive; qualify 
first class. % dozen 25c., dozen 40c., 50 $1.00,100 $1.75. 

Shaffer's Colossal -Supposed to be a cross between a Black Cap and a 
Ked Raspberry. The plant has the habit of the Black Cap Varieties, 
being propagated by layers, while the fruit has the size and general 
characteristics of the red varieties. The berries are very large, soft, 
Juicy and fine flavored Color very dark red; plant perfectly hardy, 
a vigorous grower and very productive. An excellent variety for can¬ 
ning. y t dozen25c , dozen 45c , 60 $1.20, 100 $2.00. 





LOUDEN RED RASPBERRY. 

A Grand New Red Raspberry, LOUDEN. 

II Ih cjIiiI iriod by prominent horticulturists that this Is Uiecomlng Itcd 
Raspberry, Mr. JO. H. Carman, Editor of Mio “ Rural Now Yorker,” and an 
authority on fruits, «a ys, “ Ah judged at the Jlural grounds the Louden is the 
best Hal rtaspbnrry In ex Intone c," The plantH are very vigorous and produce 
onormoiiH crops of fruit, whleli commences to ripen very early and continue 
an I o 11 k ah the latent varlotloH. The fruit Ih largo, of line color and very linn. 
The Louden HOcmH likely to HuporHodo all other varlotloH for market. 
Htrong plants by mall, 20c. each, dozen SI.no. 

BLACK RASPBERRIES, or BLACK CAPS. 

PALMER Thin Ih a new Black Cap of ureal promlHC. The plants are very 
productive, more ho, It Ih claimed, than any other variety. The fruit Is 
of good hIzo and quality and rlpoiiH early. Probably the boat early 
variety, %dozon JJOe,, dozen 500.,AO $1.10, 100 $2.00. 

CREQC With iih the largest and bent of all varlotloH of Black ltaHpborrlcs 
Ih the Gregg, Hardy, a remarkably vigorous grower, Immensely pro¬ 
ductive and of unHurpnHHod quality. A great favorite with the evap¬ 
orating cHtubllshinontH. Highly profitable for market. % dozen 25o , 
dozen line., no $1.00, 100 $1.75. 

OHIO Ono oftho best early varlotloH. Remarkably productive, with fruit 
an large an Mammoth CliiHtorand nearly an largo as theOregg. '.j dozen 
25c , dozen Wlo., 50 $1 .(K), UK) $1.75. 

BLACKBERRIES. 

Blunt In rows six foot apart and three feet apart In the rows. 

ERIE This variety ha« become very popular. The berries are of the 
largest size and the quality Is excellent. The plants arc hardy and 
productive, and produce berries of very even size, there being very few 
small ones. % dozen 05o., dozen 05c., 50 $2.00, 10083.50. 

KITTATINNY Thin Is ono of tho hesl varieties. Canes very vigorous, 
entirely hardy and exceedingly productive. Fruit of the largest size, 
specimens measuring Inches long. Firm, sweet, rich flavor, Juicy 
and of the highest quality. dozen IKK)., dozen 50c., 50 $1.25, ltX) $2.00. 
LAWTON A well known variety. Canes not as hardy as the Klttatlnny. 
Fruit large, and when ripe Is sweet, Juicy, and of the highest quality. 

1 y dozen flOo., dozen 50c., 50 $1.25, 1(K) $2.00. 

SNYDER A very Imrdy blackberry, standing our most Bovoro winters 
without protection. Berries ratbersmall but ripen early, and aresweet 
Juicy and good flavored. One of the very best varieties for the North, 
dozen «0o., dozen 5t)e„ 25 75c., 50 $1.25, 100 $2.00. 


LUCRET1A DEWBERRY— A trailing Black¬ 
berry. Ripens a week to ten days earlier 
than other blackberries. Fruit very large, 
soft, juicy and of fine flavor. A vigorous 
grower and perfectly hardy. The fruit is 
perhaps too soft for market, but fine for 
home use. Each 10c. t dozen 80c., 25 $1.65, 
50 $2.25, 100 $4.00. 

CURRANTS. 

We make a Specialty of Currants, and grow 
plants in very large quantities. 

A MONEY MAKING CROP. 

The Currant is very easily grown and adapts 
itself to any kind of soil, but at the same time 
no plant responds more quickly and gener¬ 
ously to high cultivation. Our bushes are 
planted in rows six feet apart and about three 
feet apart in the rows. In our experience there 
is no other small fruit that will pay as well as 
Currants when well taken care of. We have 
three acres in bearing from which we sold the 
past season 28,000 pounds, amounting to nearly 
$l,0o0, or a net profit, after deducting expenses 
of nearly $200 per acre. The larger part of 
our currants are “ Victorias.” 

To destroy the Caterpillars or “Currant 
Worms,” dust Hellebore powder ou the leaves 
the moment any of the worms appear. Wait, 
for a few days and if any of the worms are 
found repeat the dressing. 

More Currants are needed for making jelly 
than for all other purposes combined. For this 
purpose there is nothing to be gained by grow¬ 
ing the large varieties, such as Cherry or Fay. 
What you gain in size you lose in productive¬ 
ness. And the canning establishments and 
anyone who lias had experience in making 
Jelly, will pay no more per pound for Cherry 
Currants than for Red Dutch. Grocers, and other dealers in fruit, how¬ 
ever, usually pay aoout a cent per pound more for large Cherry Currants 
than for the smaller varieties. 

VICTORIA CURRANT— The Victoria is the most popular variety of 
Currants. The bush is of great vigor and hardiness and the fruit is of 
good Size and produced on long stems. In our experience it is by far 
the most productive variety, bushes of tho same age as Cherry or Fay's 
yielding nearly double tho quantity of fruit. Another great advantage 
Is that It Is late In ripening and therefore, can be marketed after other 
Currants are gone, when much higher prices are obtained. We have 
always sold our later pickings at higher prices than those sold first. 
They are a very profitable crop. One-year-old plants, postpaid, each 10e., 

1 dozen 40c., dozen 75c. For prices of larger quantities see below. 

Large Plants—We offer some extra largo3 year old plants of Victoria 
Currants that will bear the year after setting out. These planLs are 
altogether too large to be sent by mall. Price by express or freight, not 
prepaid, dozen 75c., 100 $4.50. 

Rod Dutch -Tho Michigan Experiment Station, after growing all the 
d 1 Heron t varieties of currants, says: ” Red Dutch, although one of the 
oldest. varieties , yet stands first among the red currants so far as quality as 
well as productiveness is concerned .” It is immensely productive, and if 
the bushes receive good cultivation and plenty of manure, the bunches 
are long and well filled out, and the fruit of good size, good color and 
high quality. Each 10c., % dozen 40c., dozen 75c. 

Cherry /(The largest- and most popular currant. Bushes not as vigorous as 
Red Dutch. Needs the best of soil and culture. When it does well it is 
one of the most profitable varieties. Good plants, each 10c., % dozen 45c., 
dozen 75c. 

White Grape-Fruit white; bunches not so long as Red Dutch, the but 
fruit Is of good size, remarkably handsome and of the highest quality'. 
Best variety for the table. It also makes beautiful and delicately 
flavored Jelly. Good plants, each 10c., % dozen 45c., dozen 75c. 

FAY’S PROLIFIC— This is a much bilked of and highly praised variety. 
Fruit about the size of the Cherry Currant, but with larger bunches. 
One-year-old plants, each 15c., % dozen 60c., dozen $1.00. 

Black Naples— The best variety of Black Currants. A vigorous grower; 
fruit very large, sometimes nearly three-fourths inch in diameter. 
There is quite a demand for Black Currants, and their cultivation is 
highly profitable. They are not attacked by the currant worm. Good 
plants, each 10c., LJ dozen, 45c., dozen 75c. 







JOSEPH HARRIS CO., MORETON FARM, N. Y. 39 


GOOSEBERRIES. 

The best American varieties of Gooseberries 
are as easily raised as currants and produce very 
nice fruit, which is delicious in pies, jams, etc., 
and sells for profitable prices in market. The 
cultivation of Gooseberries is the same as that of 
currants. 

BEST AMERICAN VARIETIES. 

NEW LARGE PROLIFIC COOSEBERRY, 

11 PEARL”— This new Gooseberry is of such 
wonderful productiveness that the bushes prc- 
sent a perfect mass of fruit. But nevertheless 
the fruit is of large size and first-class quality. 

. The fruit resembles the Downing but is larger 
and the bush much more prolific, and is not 
affected by mildew. This is the coming green 
gooseberry and will prove very profitable to 
all who grow it. Strong plants, each 30c., 
dozen $2.50. 

RED JACKET— This is the largest and most 
vigorous lied Gooseberry. The fruit is as 
large and fine as the English varieties, while 
the plant is entirely free from the mildew 
which is so destructive to these varieties 
when grown in this country. The plants are 
very productive and the fruit is handsome 
and of the best quality. A superior variety for 
home use aud very profitable for market. 

Plants by mail, postpaid, 25c.eaeli, dozen 82.25. 

Downing— This has long been considered the best 
American green Gooseberry. Fruit large, green 
when ripe, and of excellent quality. Bush a 
vigorous grower and seldom affected by mil¬ 
dew. Plants by mail each 15c., ]/ 2 dozen 75c., 
dozen $1.25, 2 dozen $2.00. 

Smith’s Seedling— With good cultivation, a 
vigorous grower and Immensely productive. 

Fruit large, pale yellow, and of superior qual¬ 
ity. Plants, each 15c., y dozen 75c., dozen $1.25, 

2 dozen $ 2 . 00 . 

Houghton -The standard variety. Enormously 
productive. Free from mildew. Fruit medi¬ 
um size, pale red, sweet and good. No garden 
should be without it. Plants, each 10c., y x 
dozen 50c., dozen 90c., 2 dozen, $1.60. 

GRAPE VINES. 

Every one who nas any land at all should set out a few Grape Vines. 
After the vines are once siarted they last for a great many years, and it is 
little trouble to take care of them. We have hud large crops from a vine 
which runs wild over an apple tree. 

• Send for a few vines, they will come postpaid by mail. Set them out 
and in a few years you will be enjoying tlieir delicious fruit. 

At the following prices we will send good two-year-old vines, prepaid 
by mail, to any address in the United States or Canada. 

Recollect, the vines we oiler are not small one-year-olds, such as arc 
usually sent by mail, but good two-year-old vines that will grow and give 
good satisfaction. For prices of plants to be sent by express see page 39. 
Delaware— Light red. One ofthc most delicious and high flavored grapes. 

No one should be without 1L 20 c. each, y, dozen 85c., dozen 81.50. 
Worden— A magnificent and delicious grape, very similar to Concord, but 
earlier and larger and equally hardy and prolific, and of far better 
quality. 20c. each, y, dozen 85c., dozen $1.50. 

Concord— Black. The Dest known and most popular of all grapes. Early, 
hardy, a vigorous grower and enormously productive. 2 uc. each, % 
dozen 75c., dozen $1.25. 

Salem— Red. A superb grape; one o 1 the best of Rogers’ seedlings; large 
and of the very best quality* vines hardy, vigorous and productive; 
medium early. 20c. each, % dozen $1.00, dozen 81 75. 

Brighton— Red A magnificent grape; large, handsome, and nearly, if not 
quite, equal In flavor to the Delaware, and fur larger. Vines vigorous 
and hardy and very productive. We can confidently recommend it. 
2oc. each, dozen gLUu. dozen $1.75. 

Moore’s Early - Black. Of all the early grapes this is the largest and best. 

Vines hardy and productive. 20c. each, % dozen $1.00 dozen $1.75. 
Niagara— White. One of the most popular of white grapes; as vigorous 
and hardy as Concord; fruit very large and handsome; quality fair. 
2nc. each, % dozen S5e., dozen $L.5o. 

MOORE’S DIAMOND -White* new; the best and most promising of all 
varieties of white grapes. It is a fine native grape, a cross between 
Concord and Iona. In size it is as large us Concord, with compact, 
handsome hunches, and the qunlilui* nijterb. They are far superior to 
any other white grape we have ever tasted. 25c. each, dozen $1.0u, 
dozen $1.75. 


WHOLESALE PRICE LIST OF PLANTS. 


At the prices below wo pack the plants and deliver them to Express 
Company or Freight Depot without extra chargo, but wo do not pny tho 

express or freight charges. 





G OOSEBER RIES. 

dog. 

zoo 

STRA WHERRIES. 

zoo 

1,000 

Poarl. 

$2.25 

s. 

Van Deman. 

51.26 

$ 9.00 

Rod Juckot. 

2.00 

i 

Greenville (P). 

80 

5.00 

Downing.. 

85 

7.00 

Parker Earle. 

90 

6.60 

.Smith’s Seedling. 

85 

7.00 

Eureka (P). 

75 

6.00 

Houghton. 

70 

5.00 

Warfield (P;. 

70 

4.00 

GRAPES —2 yr . old vines. 


Bubach(P;. 

70 

1.00 

Delaware. 

1.26 

6 .CO 

Crescent (P). 

50 

3.50 

Brighton. 

1.35 

8.00 

Wilson.. 

00 

4 00 


1.85 

90 

8.00 

5.00 

Sharpies#.. 

00 

1.00 

Concord... 




Worden. 

1.25 

6.00 

RASPBERRIES 



Moore’s Early. 

1 50 

9.00 

Louden, perdoz. $1.2-5 



Niagara. 

1.25 

0.00 

Cuthbert (Red;. 

1.26 

9.00 

Moore’s Diamond. 

1.60 

9 oo 

Marlboro (Red;. 

1.45 

10.00 

CURRANTS. 



Shaffer's Colossal (dark 



VICTORIA. 



red). 

1.45 

10.00 

1 year old plants 

2 yearold plants 

50 

60 

3.00 

4.00 

Gregg (Black;. 

1.25 

9.00 

3 year old planLs 

76 

4.50 

Palmer (Black;. 

1.75 

12.00 

Bed Dutch. 



Ohio (Black). 

1.35 

JO 00 

1 year old plants 

45 

3.00 




Cherry, 1 year old plants 

60 

3.60 

BLACKBERRIES 

ERIE. 

Kittutliiny... 

2.00 

1.50 

15.00 

10 JXJ 

White Grape... 

1 yearold plants 

Fay’s Prolific. 

1 yearold plants 

60 

*10 

3.50 

4.00 

Lawton.. 

1.50 

12 00 

2 yearold p ants 

80 

6.00 

Snyder. 

1.50 

12.00 

Black Naples. 



Lucretia Dewberry. 

3.00 


1 yeurold plants 

50 

3.50 



PEARL GOOSEBERRY .—(From a 

















































40 


HARRIS’ RURAL ANNUAL FOR 1897. 


HIGH 


GRADE FERTILIZING MATERIALS. 

SHIPPED DIRECT FROM NEW. YORK AT LOWEST PRICES. 


HOME-MADE FERTILIZERS. 

We find that It Is easy to Have at least $10.00 per ton on fertilizers by 
buying the materials separately and mixing them ourselves, instead of 
buying the ready-mixed fertilizers so largely sold under so many dim-r¬ 
ent names and “ brands.’’ We also get much better results from the 
home-mixed fertilizers. 

There is no trouble in mixing the materials. They are simply placed 
In a heap on a barn door and turned over with a shovel twoor three times, 
which mixes the di/rerent materials thoroughly. Mixing is not always 
necessary, as the different materials can often be applied separately to bet¬ 
ter ad van fa ge. 

THE VALUE OF A FERTILIZER. 

The actual value of a fertilizer or manure depends, of course, upon the 
amount of plant-food it contains and the form jn which this planufood 
exists. The only elements of plant food that it is necessary to furnish are 
Nitrogen, Phosphoric AcJd and Potash. These, therefore, are the only ele¬ 
ments of value In a fertilizer, and we should aim to get theseas cheaply as 
possible and In the best forms. Jf anyone will take the trouble to calcu¬ 
late what these elements cost In the unmixed materials, and will apply 
these values to the amounts contained in the ordinary mixed fertilizers, it 
will ho seen that the same amount of planUfood can be obtained in un- 
mixed materials at a saving of $8.00 to $15.00 per ton. The cost of mixing 
is not over $1.00 per ton, and can often be done for practically nothing. 

ADVANTAGES OF BUYING UNMIXED 
MATERIALS. 

In summing up the advantages of buying plant-fooa in the form of un- 
mlxcd materials Instead of in mixed or complete” fertilizers, we have:— 

If'lnL—A great saving in cost. This Is a very Important point, and 
often makes Hie difference between profit and loss In the use of fertilizers. 

Second -The nitrogen (ammonia) can ho obtained In the form most 
suited to the crop and other conditions. This is also very Important, ns in 
most mixed fertilizers Llio nitrogen Is In a form that Ih not Immediately 
available, and so does not produce as good results as are obtained from the 
use of a more soluble and available form. 

Third -The different ingredients can he applied either together or 
separately, as most convenient, and at the Mine and manner most suited 
to Min conditions under which they are tisod. 


DIRECTIONS FOR USING FERTILIZING 
MATERIALS. 

We shall he glad to send lo anyone who has not already received It a 
U'-puge Pamphlet entitled 11 Pood for Plants,” containing complete direc¬ 
tions for mixing and applying fertilizers, and suggestions as to what to use 
on different crops, 

FERTILIZERS FOR LAWNS. 

A thrifty (lark green, luxuriant growth of grass on a lawn adds moro 
lo the attractiveness and beauty of grounds than almost anything else. To 
obtain this, people often cover their lawns with Htahlo inanuronnd endure 
the foul odors ami disreputable appeuranco of tholr grounds all winter. 

This discomfort and annoyance Is entirely unnecessary. The same 
amount of plant-food contained In the manure can be furnished to tho 
grass hi the form of absolutely odorless chemical fertilizers which will 
produce Just as luxuriant growth orgrass mid lasting effect as tho manure. 

We find tliata mixture of one-half superphosphate, two-fifths nitrate 
of soda and one-tenth muriate of potash, to have tho best elfeot on a lawn 
giving the grass a rich dark green color, which stands very dry weather 
without, turning brown, The fertilizers should bo applied early in the 
Hprlng broadcast, at the rate of about two pounds of the mixture per luo 
squuro foot, 

In order to ueeommodato our customers who do not want the trouble 
of mixing these materials, we will send a mixture composed of suporphos- 
plmle, nitrate of so.,a and muriate of potash, In the proper proportions at 
tho following prices: 

00 ... | jiuo •*. a <v! 

This mixture Will be found very QfiVotlvo as a fertilizer for all garden 
crops as well ns for small fruits, roses and other flowers. 


PRICE LIST OF FERTILIZING MATERIALS. 

We can furnish fertilizing materials of the best grade, delivered on 
cars at New York City or at Rochester, at lowest market rates. Prices de¬ 
pend a great deal upon the quantity required. It costs nearly as much to 
ship a hag as a ton. Very small quantities that have to be re-bagged have 
to be shipped from Rochester, and the cost is necessarily considerably 
greater than for larger quantities. 

Terms, strictly Cash with Order. 


NITRATE OF SODA. 

Nitrate comes from South America in bags of about 300 lbs. each. 
When shipped to this country the original bags are covered with an out¬ 
side bag which prevents loss. When ordered in even bag lots-300 lbs 
GOO lbs., 000 lbs., etc.—we ship direct from New York. Smaller quantities 
than 300 lbs. are shipped from Rochester. 

Guaranteed Analysis -95 to 97 per cent, pure nitrate of soda, containing 
1">K to 10 per cent, nitrogen (equal to 18 to 19 per cent, of ammonia). 

Shipped from Rochester , screened ready for use: 

10 lbs. q w 


Shipped from New York in original hags , subject to market changes • 

1 bag, 300 lbs.. . go ' 

3 bags, 900 “ . 2 o 00 

Price of larger quantities given on application. 


MURIATE OF POTASH. 

Highest grade, containing 50 to 52 per cent, of actual potash. 


Shipped from Rochester: 

10 lbs. 

50 ” . 

100 “ . 


% .50 
2.00 
3.50 


Shipped from New York in 

l bag, 224 lbs. 

3 bags, 072 ” . 

1 ton, 2,000 “ . 


original bags of 22 h lbs, each: 

.$ 5.76 

. 10.50 

.*. 40.50 


SUPERPHOSPHATE. 

1 his superphosphate of lime Is of high grade and in perfect condition 
for drilling, being very fine and dry. 

Guaranteed Analysis—Soluble and available phosphoric acid, 13 to 14 
per cent.; Insoluble phosphoric acid, y to 1 per cent.; total phosphoric 


acid, 14 to 15 per cent. 

Shipped from Rochester: 

10 lljH .$ .30 

50 “ ... 1.00 

100 “ ... 1.75 

Shipped from New York: 

I bag, 200 lbs.$2.00 

5 bags, 1,000 “ . 8.00 

10 bags, 1 ton. 15 .Oil 


Special low rates given on carload lots of 12 tons. Please write for 
prices. It will pay to got up a club and order a carload, as freight charges 
are much less per ton on carloads than on smaller shipments. 

DISSOLVED BONE BLACK. 

Some people have an Idea that phosphoric acid from bones Is better 
than mineral phosphate. Bone Black is made from bones that have been 
used In tho process of refining sugar. It contains from 13 to 18 percent. 
soluble and available phosphoric acid. 


Sh ipped from Rochester: 

lb Iks.$ .40 

• r »0 “ . i.4o 

100 “ ... 2 50 

Sh Ipped from New York: 

1 bag, 200 lbs.$ 3.50 

6 k«gs. 12.00 

1 tou .23.00 




































HARDY BRONZE TURKEYS. ONE FOURTH^ £* QQ g 

I T is well known that the Bronze Turkey is directly descended from our 
native wild turkeys. But by being domesticated and in-bred they have 
become more tender and liable to diseases than the wild stock. In 1S93 
the Rhode Island Experiment Station made some experiments with crossing 
domestic Bronze Turkeys with a half-wild gobbler. The.results were most 
gratifying. The young turkeys from this cross were more hardy , vigorous niul 
healthy than the pure domestic Bronze stock. 

In 1894 we procured a gobbler with one-fourth wild blood and put him with 
one of our flocks of Bronze Turkeys. The young stock from this cross were 
remarkably healthy and vigorous. We had had great difficulty raising the 
young turkeys from the pure domestic stock, having lost nearly half the 
young turkeys hatched, but with the introduction of the wild blood we had 
no more trouble raising the young turkeys. They were very vigorous and 
free from disease, and grew faster and matured earlier than tno domestic stock. 

We have since obtained two half-wild gobblers, having been bred from a pure 
wild gobbler obtained in the mountains of Pennsylvania. 

We now have some very fine one-fourth wild stock for salo that is healthy 
and vigorous. We strongly advise the use of a one-fourth wild gobbler with 
domestic hens, whether pure Bronze or grades. New blood should bo Intro¬ 
duced in a flock at least every other year In order to keep the stock healthy 
and vigorous. 

PRICES OF ONE-FOURTH WILD TURKEYS. 

Young Gobbler, early hatched, large and vigorous.$ 6 00 

“ “ later hatched, strong and healthy ..... 5 00 

Pair—Gobbler and hen, both flrst-class, early hatched. 8 50 

Trio—One Gobbler and two Hens, all flrst-class. U 00 

Our %-wild gobblers weigh from 20 to 25 lbs. and hens about 15 or 10 lbs. 

EGGS—We can furnish eggs from one-fourth wild stock at S3 per setting 
of 9 eggs. Orders booked at any time and eggs sent when turkeys commence 
to lay In April. 

What Others Say of Our Turkeys. 

Mr. B. C. Baushor, Windsor Castle, Pa., wrote us Dec. 2, 1890’ “ I bought 
one gobbler of you last year and I am well pleased with him. Ilo will weigh 
some 35 lbs. * * I had visitors at my house to-day and they told mo that I had a nice lot of turkoys. I am well pleased with those klnd. M 

Mr. G. S. Lukens, of Juniatia Co., Pa., wrote us March 28, 1890*. “The turkeys came O. It. Am well pleased with thorn. Thanks for 
your honest dealing. Men have beon here to see the turkeys and say they are tine.” 


HARDY BRONZE TURKEY 


IMPERIAL PEKIN DUCKS. 

THE BE8T BREED OF DUOKS IN THE WORLD. 


W E make a specialty of brooding those magntfleout 
Ducks, and have a largo flock, all tired from Ran¬ 
kin's and Hallock’s celebrated strains, which are 
the llnest ducks In this country. Pekin Ducks do not 
require a pond of water, but do well when they have 
only enough water to drink. They mature very rapidly, 
being ready for market when ten weekSOld, at which age 
they often weigh from four to five pounds, drossod, and 
attain a much heavier weight when older Thoy aro often 
mistaken for geese by visitors to our farm. 

Do not In breed. If you have Pekin Ducks or grade 
or common ducks that you want to improve, get a new 
Moroton farm Pekin Dmko. A change of blood is very 
desirable. 

Pekin Ducks lay very early—earlier, wo think, than 
any other breed of ducks. We need not say that this is a 
very great advantage in every respect. Early ducks aro 
scarce and command a high price In market. Do not 
put off ordering duckH till spring. You should got them 
now. They will do boiler and lay earlier. We ship on|y 
kakly hatciikd ducks that aro large, vigorous and well 
developed. We box and deliver them to express com¬ 
pany at the following rates: 

Drake ...ft oo 

Drake and Duck . . .. a 76 

Ilrnki) uijiI two DiiPku. , ft. go 

EGGH-our eggs arc all from ducks that have free range And are 
consequently much more fertile mid trie ducklings more vigorous 
than those from yarded birds. Eggs carefully packed and guaranteed 
to reoi'li tho purchaser in good order. 

Price of Early Eggs, to ho Delivered Before April 1. 

Oik Kitting DO eggs). $1 00 | W Kggs_ _$3 00 

Two Httlngs (00 eggs). ... 1 86 I 100 Kggs . . . u 60 

tOO eggs or more fa.OO jut 100. 

KEDCOEP PRICKS FOR DAT Kit FMOH. 

After April 1 we will fill orders at the following reduced /ates: 

One Kittingf 10eggij. |0 7ft| 50 Kggs.13.60 

Two Sittings (30 eggs). 1 40 I 100 Kggs... i.V) 

AM orders for eggs Jlllcd in rotation. We commence shipping 
duck eggs about Man'll I. 


PEKIN DRAKE. 


Kggs 8e*t 8000 Mlie*- Ln.t rprlng Mr .1 II llartholomciv, of 
Vancouver. ItrlliKh Columbia, order tif u xlttmg of duck egg« from us. 
He wnb July K. DK4 “The sitting of duelc eggs you sent vo n. O K. 
Had one broken, eight of the remaining nlnowere fertile. Tin- duck 
lings are wry large and rigorous. Am much plrawd with them." 






















I hree Most Profitable Cabbages. «aS *£ <£ 


Hollander. 


Danish u Solid Emperor, 
(From a Photograph.) 


HARRIS' SHORT STEM, ; 
oe “SOLID EMPEROR, 


ft The Finest Strain of Hardening DANISH CABBAGE. 
Brings the Highest Prices in market. See page 7. 


Grand New Potatoes 


Three 


Great Divide. 


Washington. 

(From a Photograph) 


For Description and Price of these and other choice varieties of Potatoes, see pages 2 \ and 22, 


The WASHINGTON is Nearest to PERFECTION Yet Attained